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Welcome

Welcome to the Office of Public Programs website for the 2002 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 49.

1 | 2 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 26-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Obesity growing threat to world health
The world is round and so are a growing number of its inhabitants. In fact, obesity is spreading at an alarming rate, not just in industrialized countries but in developing countries, where obesity often sits next to malnutrition.

Contact: Jan Wenzel
wenzel@advance.uri.edu
401-874-5190
University of Rhode Island

Public Release: 19-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Economist says government should subsidize training of innovators
Fueled by a rapidly expanding supply of scientists and engineers, America`s mighty economic engine powered the nation through more than a century of remarkable wealth creation. But Stanford Graduate School of Business economist Paul Romer warns that in the coming decades, the economic engine could begin to run out of gas.

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Agri-tech innovations promise better food security
With close to 800 million people suffering from hunger, most in the southern hemisphere, the developing world is embracing innovative agricultural techniques that promise increased food production while reducing environmental damage and achieving sustainability.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
New frontiers for dinosaur science
Dr. Paul C. Sereno's ongoing field work in Africa has yielded a menagerie of new dinosaurs. The latest discoveries have included the 40-foot long crocodilian, Sarcosuchus—otherwise known as "super-croc"—and several smaller relatives, such as a tiny dwarf croc. Other recent finds included Africa's first small predatory dinosaur, and a very unusual armored plant-eater.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Neural stem cells move to damaged areas of brain after injury
Primitive neural cells in the brains of laboratory rats respond to acute brain injuries by moving to the injured area and attempting to form new neurons, according to University of Michigan neurologist Jack M. Parent, M.D. Understanding how this self-repair mechanism works could someday help physicians reduce brain damage caused by strokes or neurodegenerative diseases.
NIH/National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Sally Pobojewski
pobo@umich.edu
734-615-6912
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 18-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Alien life forms more likely to be found outside solar system, says Colorado prof.
The chance of detecting life outside our own solar system probably is greater than discovering it on neighboring planets and moons like Mars or Europa, a moon of Jupiter, according to a University of Colorado at Boulder professor.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Norman Pace
norman.pace@colorado.edu
303-735-1808
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 17-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Global warming will persist at least a century even if emissions curbed now
Though significant uncertainty remains regarding the amount of global warming that will occur over the next century or two, scientists agree that the trend will continue for the next hundred years even if fossil fuel consumption is dramatically reduced. Professor Robert Dickinson of Georgia Tech will present the evidence for this assessment at the AAAS meeting on Feb. 17 in Boston.

Contact: Jane M. Sanders
jane.sanders@edi.gatech.edu
404-894-2214
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 17-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
The science of the scoop: Wheat proteins for ice cream?
Ice-modifying proteins extracted from winter wheat may help ice cream stay smooth and creamy during long periods in the freezer, suggests new research by food scientist Douglas Goff of the University of Guelph, in Canada. Today, Goff and other ice cream experts presented the science, technology, and cultural trends that go into making the perfect scoop, at a session on "The Science of Ice Cream," at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Ecologist Gretchen Daily advocates saving the planet by making conservation profitable
To the casual observer, corporations and conservationists seem to be in a constant state of war. But if big business and the conservation movement continue down the path of confrontation, all of humanity will be put in peril as our ever-shrinking natural resources vanish from the Earth, argues Stanford ecologist Gretchen C. Daily. "It's time to begin figuring out how to assign economic value to ecosystems and the services they provide," she says.

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
831-239-3312
Stanford University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Military technologies and increased fishing effort leave no place for fish to hide
A group of leading marine scientists will present examples from around the world showing that new technologies and increasing fishery effort make the need for marine reserves imperative, today at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Boston.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 17-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Making ice cream more then just cranking
Sweet and cold with a wonderful mouth feel, ice cream is an American favorite, but far from the soft, icy product produced by hand-cranked freezers, today's commercial ice cream is a complex product designed and engineered for the best attributes.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Why can't Johnny understand science, at AAAS session?
Why, asks Cornell University professor Bruce Lewenstein, do most people know so little about science? The question will be at a symposium, "Best Practices From Research Scientists Who Communicate With The Public" at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting.

Contact: David Brand
deb27@cornell.edu
607-255-3651
Cornell University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Rutgers scientist links ice and snow shifts to global climate change at Boston AAAS Meeting
The symposium, "Deciphering the Complex Changes in Global Ice and Snow," on Feb. 16 at the AAAS Annual Meeting, will bring together experts in various dimensions of climatology to assess the state of the earth's cryosphere in relation to global climate change. It was co-organized by David Robinson of Rutgers, who will open the symposium with his paper on snow cover trends and global climate change.

Contact: Joseph Blumberg
blumberg@ur.rutgers.edu
732-932-7084 x652
Rutgers University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Maya children in U.S. more likely to be overweight and obese than whites or blacks
Maya children in the United States are taller and longer-legged than Mayan children in Guatemala, as a result of greater access to food and health care. But they are also much heavier, probably because they are more sedentary, according to an anthropologist at the University of Michigan-Dearborn.

Contact: Terry Gallagher
tgallagh@umd.umich.edu
313-593-5518
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Researchers reveal massive reduction in productivity of the North Atlantic
Using innovative techniques for mapping fisheries, scientists released the results of the first ocean-wide synthesis of the status of fisheries in the North Atlantic, showing the cumulative extraction of fishes from the sea. These pioneering techniques and results, presented here in Boston at a session of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting entitled, "Fisheries-induced Changes in Marine Ecosystems," included policy experts, marine researchers and scientists.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Sea levels likely to rise higher than IPCC predictions
From melting glaciers, to earlier spring seasons, to the collapsing fringes of the Antarctic ice sheet: climatic change is underway at the Earth's poles and high latitudes, according to research presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting today.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Global sea levels likely to rise higher in 21st century than previous predictions
New calculations by a University of Colorado at Boulder researcher indicate global sea levels likely will rise more by the end of this century than predictions made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2001.
US Geological Survey, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mark Meier
mark.meier@colorado.edu
303-492-6556
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
In search of extra dimensions: Hang on-a new reality may be around the corner
Our understanding of reality-that is, a world where events happen over time within a three-dimensional space-may be turned on its head by the year 2005, scientist Maria Spiropulu said today during the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Straightening a robot arm is not as easy as you think
A Cornell University mathematician and colleagues at McGill and the Free University of Berlin have proven that a complex polygonal arc in a plane can always be straightened, work which applies to the manipulation of robot arms, protein folding and other problems in engineering and biology. The work will be discussed at a symposium during the AAAS annual meeting in February.

Contact: Bill Steele
ws21@cornell.edu
607-255-7164
Cornell University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
North Atlantic study reveals food fish catches have declined by half - despite tripled fishing effort
An international group of leading fisheries scientists will release the results of the first ever ocean-wide synthesis of the status of fisheries in the North Atlantic today at a press conference at the American Association of the Advancement of Science in Boston.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Neuron
Brain imaging study suggests some aging-related memory loss may be reversible
The gradual loss of cognitive functions, especially memory skills, is often a consequence of human aging. Now, research from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Washington University in St. Louis has used sophisticated brain imaging techniques to pinpoint cognitive mechanisms behind age-related memory difficulties and to confirm that some factors associated with these difficulties can be reversed with the proper support.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, National Institute on Mental Health, Alzheimer's Association, others

Contact: Gerry Everding
gerry_everding@aismail.wustl.edu
314-935-6375
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Livermore lab physicist to discuss exploration of the universe and beyond using laboratory astrophysics
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory physicist Bruce Remington will be discussing this and other findings (Feb. 16) at 4:30 p.m. EST in a presentation entitled: "Laboratory Astrophysics Using High- Power Lasers," during the "Visualizing and Looking Beyond Earth" track of the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Alaskan waters growing hospitable to sharks while seals and sea lions decline
More sharks – and fewer sea lions, seals and other pinnipeds – in Alaska's sub-arctic waters are the result of the decades-long swing in climate caused by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and possibly global warming. Instead of orcas, pinnipeds and a few sharks as top predators, the new "steady-state" is orcas, increasing numbers of sharks and declining numbers of pinnipeds, reports a University of Washington researcher, who speaks Feb. 16 at the AAAS meeting in Boston.
North Pacific Universities Marine Mammal Research Consortium

Contact: Sandra Hines
shines@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Before two trains collide, what is the best course of action?
Within a context he calls the 'train-wreck' between society's expectations and demands on the field of medicine, and the resistance of payers to cover healthcare expenses, Gilbert S. Omenn, M.D., Ph.D., U-M executive vice president for medical affairs, is providing insight today into what the U-M Medical School is doing to address the challenges in medical education.

Contact: Mary Beth Reilly
reillymb@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Neuron
Training can improve age-related memory decline in elderly
Studies using a powerful imaging technique that measures brain activity indicate that some cognitive deficits associated with aging may not be completely irreversible. By comparing brain activity as young and older adults were asked to memorize a series of words, HHMI researchers have found that one type of memory-processing deficit often seen in the elderly might be improved by explicit training.

Contact: Jim Keeley
keeleyj@hhmi.org
301-215-8858
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Showing releases 1-25 out of 49.

1 | 2 > >>

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