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Welcome

Welcome to the Office of Public Programs website for the 2002 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-49 out of 49.

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Research News Release

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
University admissions: New test methods earn high marks
Supplementing traditional admissions tests with creative and practical alternatives provides a more accurate picture of how students will fare in college or graduate school, Robert J. Sternberg said today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
AAAS speakers report worldwide 'epidemic' of obesity
Obesity, considered until recently to be an exclusively "Western" disease, now poses a serious threat to the health of developing nations, particularly children, say scientists studying this emerging "global epidemic of fat."

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Rethinking the role of affiliation and aggression in primate groups
One of the fundamental assumptions about primates is under attack. Two American primatologists are challenging the current and dominant theory that competition is the driving force of social behavior in primates. They offer a new theory that recognizes cooperation and affiliation as the species’ primary social behaviors.

Contact: Andrea Lynn
a-lynn@uiuc.edu
217-333-2177
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 15-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
The new biology of rocks: 'Are there medical implications of geomicrobiology?'
If microbial life is found on Mars, will it be native to the planet or something carried there from Earth? Either way, will it be safe to return samples of such organisms to Earth? Astrobiology, the search for life elsewhere, says a University of Illinois microbiologist, is making us look a lot closer at microbial life on Earth – how it adapts and its relationship to emerging infectious diseases.

Contact: Jim Barlow
b-james3@uiuc.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 15-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Science
Still waters? 'Clear-cutting' robs the deep-sea of ancient treasures
Deep beneath the Earth's oceans, "Ancient groves of invertebrates are being clear-cut by trawling just as quickly and surely as loggers felled groves of giant redwoods," Callum M. Roberts reported today during the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Origins of 'modern' behavior might be linked to population pressures
Some unique behaviors associated with modern humans--including a shift in diet and the earliest evidence of personal ornaments like beads--may be linked to an increase in human population density between 40 and 50 thousand years ago, Mary C. Stiner and Steven L. Kuhn reported today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Preliminary research suggests potential nitric oxide link to cocoa consumption
The latest research suggests that consumption of a cocoa rich in flavanols, a sub-group of naturally occurring flavonoids, may be associated with the modulation of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide is a compound critical for healthy blood flow and blood pressure and has been identified by scientists as an important compound in the area of cardiovascular health. This new preliminary research was presented during a symposium at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).
Mars, Incorporated

Contact: Barbara King/Gaby Beecher
gbeecher@aronowandpollock.com
212-941-1414
Aronow & Pollock Communications, Inc.

Public Release: 15-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Information technology provides biologists with new tools for biodiversity conservation
Information Technology (IT) is spurring a revolution in biodiversity research that can deliver a more complete view of the world and help conserve species. Six biologists will speak today at American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting in Boston, MA. They will present findings across issues as varied as biodiversity itself, but their unifying message is that IT has become a vital tool for understanding global biodiversity issues that are crucial for sustainability.

Contact: Diana Wall
Diana@nrel.colostate.edu
970-491-2504
International Biodiversity Observation Year

Public Release: 15-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Origami helps scientists solve problems
Origami - the ancient Japanese tradition of paper folding has long been recognized as an art, but now origami is providing the answers to real world problems in mathematics, engineering, and astronomy proving that origami is more than just child’s play. Examples of origami techniques applied to scientific research will be presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Boston, MA in a session entitled, "Mathematics and Science of Origami: Visualize the Possibilities" on February 15, at 2:30pm ET.

Contact: Emilie Lorditch
elorditc@aip.org
301-209-3029
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 15-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
AAAS airs McClintock and Franklin discrimination legends
Geneticist Barbara McClintock awoke to learn she had become a Nobel laureate in physiology or medicine. Within days, the media gathered biographical material about the quiet scientist, and disturbing stories about her academic life surfaced: First, that Cornell University had denied her admission into its graduate plant breeding program in the 1920s and, second, that the University of Missouri had denied her tenure in the 1930s.

Contact: Blaine P. Friedlander Jr.
bpf2@cornell.edu
607-255-3290
Cornell University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Hemophilia trials, other studies may herald successful gene therapies for human diseases
Researchers are advancing on the goal of successfully using gene therapy to treat the crippling bleeding disorder hemophilia. Dr. Katherine High reviewed clinical trials of gene therapy at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and described how knowledge gained from earlier studies, along with improved technology, suggests that gene therapy will become a successful, powerful tool for treating a wide range of other diseases in addition to hemophilia.

Contact: Lisa Packer
packer@email.chop.edu
215-590-4092
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 15-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Language change and cultural continuity: communicating after 200 years in space
Will space travelers speak a language we can understand when they return from a 200-year journey? That's the question posed by Sarah Thomason, a professor of linguistics at the University of Michigan, in her presentation at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting here today.

Contact: Joanne Nesbit
mjnesbit@umich.edu
734-647-4418
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 15-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
New solutions needed for extinction prevention and for sustainable management of marine resources
Overfishing and overuse of coastal regions have severely damaged marine habitats. New socioeconomic and ecological strategies are urgently needed to manage fisheries sustainably and preserve marine resources, Stanford scientists say. Only such action can ensure the long-term survival of marine ecosystems and the profitability of fisheries.

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Is the evidence for human 'replacement' really clear?
The "replacement" of Neandertals by modern humans in Europe 40,000 years ago is th standard textbook scenario in paleoanthropology but the human fossils and archaeological material that supposedly document the shift are actually far from clear. The accumulating evidence, particularly in archaeology, "is increasingly one of geographical and behavioral mosaics," argues an ASU paleoanthropologist.

Contact: James Hathaway
Hathaway@asu.edu
480-965-6375
Arizona State University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
New world of nanoelectronics may arrive in the near future, AAAS speakers say
A future filled with tiny, molecule-sized computers-fast and powerful enough to do things like translate conversations on the fly or calculate complex climate models-may be closer than people think, top nanotechnology researchers said at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting in Boston today.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
'Bird brains' take heart-our feathered friends are no slouch at cognition
Birds are remarkably adept at tasks involving communication, navigation, and certain types of memory, researchers have found. In some unusual cases, these abilities may even surpass those of humans. Although we tend to think of cognition as the purview of humans and our closely related kin, it's time to extend the courtesy to birds as well, scientists said today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Extreme weather science and forecasting, new earth science insights, highlight NASA presentations at AAAS symposium
NASA scientists and other researchers will present four symposiums this weekend concerning the latest advances in severe weather detection, the complex changes in global snow and ice, global environmental monitoring and the interactions of aerosols and climate. These presentations will take place as part of the 2002 American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Boston, beginning Friday, February 15, 2002.

Contact: Cynthia M. O'Carroll
Cynthia.M.OCarroll.1@gsfc.nasa.gov
301-614-5563
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 8-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Carnegie Mellon cognitive neuroscientist to present: 'The mind's eye and the brain's matter.'
When visual scenes contain multiple objects and people, we take it for granted that we can recognize them all with ease and accuracy. But just how the brain gathers and makes sense of raw visual material remains something of a mystery. Scientists like Carnegie Mellon University Associate Professor of Psychology Marlene Behrmann are creating a better understanding of our mind's "eye" and changing the landscape for possible treatment of brain disorders.

Contact: Teresa S. Thomas
ts2h@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-3580
Carnegie Mellon University

Award Announcement

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
AAAS awards the Philip Abelson Prize to 'Green Revolution' champion Norman Borlaug
What began as a "quiet" wheat revolution in Mexico took on global proportions in the 1960s, when the "Green Revolution" averted millions of people from the threat of famine. Norman Borlaug, often credited with establishing this potent increase in crop production in developing countries over a short period of time, receives the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Philip Hauge Abelson Prize. Borlaug was honored for lifetime achievements in scientific research and contributions to the scientific community.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
AAAS names Etta Z. Falconer and James H.M. Henderson to receive the Mentor Award for Lifetime Achievement
For their impact on increasing diversity in science and engineering, mathematician Etta Z. Falconer and biologist James H. M. Henderson are presented the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Mentor Award for Lifetime Achievement.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
AAAS honors individuals for achievements in science
The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) honors scientists and engineers for their achievements at an awards ceremony at the 2002 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston on Saturday, 16 February from 12:15pm-1:15 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom of the Sheraton Boston Hotel.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
617-236-1550
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 22-Jan-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
AAAS announces Science Journalism Award winners
AAAS recognizes twelve individuals as winners in the six categories that comprise the Science Journalism Award (SJA) competition. The 2001 SJA program is sponsored by the Whitaker Foundation. The 2001 awards will be presented by Tim Radford of The Guardian on 15 February 2002 at the Prudential Center, Top of the Hub, during the AAAS Annual Meeting (www.eurekalert.org/aaasnewsroom).
Whitaker Foundation

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6431
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Meeting Announcement

Public Release: 16-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
Smarr to speak at AAAS meeting
Larry Smarr, Director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, will deliver a Plenary Lecture to the AAAS Annual Meeting Feb. 16 on extending the Internet with sensornets to support science and emergency preparedness.

Contact: Doug Ramsey
dramsey@ucsd.edu
858-822-5825
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 12-Feb-2002
AAAS 2002 Annual Meeting
NSF speakers to address trust, communication, language, and learning at AAAS meeting
This year’s annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Boston will feature several National Science Foundation (NSF) speakers and organizers. The meeting will be held Feb. 14-19 at the Hynes Convention Center, the Sheraton Boston Hotel, and the Boston Marriott-Copley Place.

Contact: William Harms
wharms@nsf.gov
703-292-7756
National Science Foundation

Showing releases 26-49 out of 49.

<< < 1 | 2

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