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Showing releases 1-25 out of 121.

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Research News Releases

Public Release: 18-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Pain and the brain: Sex, hormones & genetics affect brain's pain control system
Gender, sex hormones, and genes appear to play a big part in how individuals' bodies and emotions react to pain, according to new data. The findings, from brain scans of the brain's natural painkiller system in action, include surprising data showing that women's ability to handle pain increases with their estrogen levels. The studies may help determine why some people, especially women, are more frequently prone to disorders - like temporomandibular joint pain and fibromyalgia.

Contact: Sally Pobojewski
pobo@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 18-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Future health of Earth's atmosphere, how to make it snow
The challenge of anticipating potential harm to Earth's atmosphere and the science of making snow will be addressed by two scientists from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Denver, February 13-18.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anatta
anatta@ucar.edu
303-497-8604
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 18-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Word scans indicate new ways of searching the Web
A Cornell University professor has developed a method for a computer to find the topics that dominate a discussion at a particular time by scanning large collections of documents for sudden, rapid bursts of words.

Contact: Bill Steele
ws21@cornell.edu
607-255-7164
Cornell University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Researcher identifies North American hotspots for fish conservation
At a time when conservation budgets are tight but species continue to be threatened with extinction, setting priorities is essential.

Contact: Nancy Ross-Flanigan
rossflan@umich.edu
734-647-1853
University of Michigan

Public Release: 18-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Case for massive black hole strengthened
UCLA astronomer Andrea Ghez reported at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Denver that the case for the monstrous black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy has been strengthened substantially, and that all of the proposed alternatives can be excluded.

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
stuartw@college.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 18-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Village depopulatiom in southwest reflects successful agriculture
What often is described as abandonment of Southwestern village sites by ancient inhabitants is frequently inaccurate when the archaeological evidence is scrutinized, according to a University of Colorado at Boulder anthropologist.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Linda Cordell
Linda,Cordell@colorado.edu
303-492-0566
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 18-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Misunderstanding the prehistoric southwest: what happened at Chaco?
Two University of Colorado at Boulder researchers have developed intriguing theories on the mysterious demise of the Chaco Canyon Pueblo people and the larger Chaco region that governed an area in the Southwest about the size of Ohio before it collapsed about 1125.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Steve Lekson
Steve.Lekson@colorado.edu
303-492-6671
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Leatherback sea turtles careening towards extinction
Today, at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting, scientists made an impassioned appeal for international cooperation to save leatherback sea turtles from extinction. Leatherbacks are the oldest, largest, and widest-ranging marine animals ever to swim through our global ocean.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
There's no business like snow business
Snow flakes may be the world's most innovative seasonal marketing campaign. Advertisers would be hard pressed to generate the sales and scientific research sparked by snow flakes--winter's one-of-a-kind ads. Snow is always falling somewhere in the world, and scientists and engineers are amassing a wealth of winter knowledge: the science of snow and skiing.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
The Arctic oscillation: A key to this winter's cold--and a warmer planet
Why has the Arctic warmed so dramatically in recent years? How does the Arctic's circulation keep frigid air over the poles and sometimes allow it to spill across the United States? And how might global change affect the behavior of this circulation? Clara Deser, from the National Center for Atmospheric Research, will address these and other questions in a presentation at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anatta
anatta@ucar.edu
303-497-8604
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
North to discuss psychiatric effects of terrorism at AAAS
Carol S. North, M.D., professor of psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, will discuss her research on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the psychiatric effects of terrorism as part of a session on PTSD from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 17 at the annual meeting for the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Denver, CO.

Contact: Gila Z. Reckess
reckessg@msnotes.wustl.edu
314-286-0109
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Can carbon sequestration solve global warming?
The U.S. Government is spending millions of dollars to research the feasibility of stuffing carbon dioxide into coal seams and fields of briny water deep beneath the Earth. But, a scientist at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting argues that the government isn't thinking big enough in its plans to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mapping the brain
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed computerized atlases and associated tools for visualizing and analyzing the brain.

Contact: Gila Z. Reckess
reckessg@msnotes.wustl.edu
314-286-0109
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
New monsoon forecasting method could increase crop yields
A recently devised method for forecasting monsoon-season weather in Bangladesh could improve agricultural production in south Asia and equatorial Africa, according to a climate researcher at the Georgia Institute of Technology.
US State Department

Contact: Jane Sanders
jane.sanders@edi.gatech.edu
404-894-2214
Georgia Institute of Technology Research News

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Symposium highlights industrial-strength math
The numerous uses of numbers in a variety of industrial settings will be examined at "Math Inside! An Industrial View," a symposium at the American Association for the Advancement of Science's annual meeting in the Colorado Convention Center, Denver.

Contact: Deane Morrison
morri029@umn.edu
612-624-2346
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Chromatin structure: More folding, more complexity than expected
New molecular technologies, some driven by the work of a researcher at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, are exposing unexpectedly high levels of DNA folding and complex protein-rich assemblages within the nucleus of cells that he says "seriously challenge the textbook models."

Contact: Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
b-james3@uiuc.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Tariffs and farm subsidies deny health and affluence
To fend off starvation and prevent children in underdeveloped countries from becoming malnourished, industrialized nations must tear up their import tariffs, open their markets to agricultural goods and stop farm subsidies, says a Cornell food policy expert at the AAAS convention in Denver.

Contact: Blaine P. Friedlander Jr.
bpf2@cornell.edu
607-255-3290
Cornell University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
The nucleus: Not just a bag of chromosomes
Educators and scientists should discard the idea that a cell's nucleus is just a bag of chromosomes, according to Johns Hopkins' cell biologist Kathy Wilson, Ph.D. In a Feb. 17 session at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Denver, Wilson and five others will introduce visual evidence of the nucleus's newly recognized importance.

Contact: Joanna Downer
jdowner1@jhmi.edu
410-614-5105
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
A rainforest in Denver? Kirk Johnson debuts new findings on city's natural history
Local celebrity-scientist Kirk Johnson, of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science (DMNS) will give a topical lecture discussing his surprising discovery of a 64.1-million-year-old rainforest that grew in the Denver Basin, following the demise of dinosaurs. His findings, which may help Denver urban planners and researchers to manage groundwater, are expected to debut during his lecture on Sunday, February 16 at the AAAS Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6400
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Brief exposure to Mandarin can help American infants learn Chinese
Researchers have found a way to reverse what appears to be a universal decline in foreign language speech perception that begins toward the end of the first year of life. University of Washington neuroscientist Patrica Kuhl reported today that 9-month-old American infants who were exposed to Mandarin Chinese for less than five hours in a laboratory setting were able to distinguish phonetic elements of that language.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joel Schwarz
joels@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository
A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientist, who is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences' National Research Council, on Tuesday will give a progress report on the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository at the 2003 meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Antarctic animals are under threat from illegal fishing
Animals in the oceans surrounding Antarctica are under increasing threat. Fishery management organisations and governments need to do more to eliminate illegal fishing and regulate better legal fishing in Southern Ocean and adjacent areas according to Professor John Croxall speaking today (17 Feb) at a special symposium - Conserving Migratory Marine Organisms: Protecting animals with ocean-sized habitats organised by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Contact: Athena Dinar
a.dinar@bas.ac.uk
44-122-322-1414
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
iScope, you scope, we all scope a mouse brain
"Tall, Dark, and Handsome." It sounds like a personals ad for a Valentine's date, but these romantic terms describe not men but microscopes--three of them--at your service from dusk till dawn. The trio of hefty, slide-filled microscopes will soon be plugged into the internet to help researchers study the mouse brain, free of the logistical problems associated with borrowing from a traditional lending library.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Infants may offer clues to language development
You may not know it, but you took a course in linguistics as a baby. By listening to the talk around them, infants pick up sound patterns that help them understand the speech they hear, according to new research from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. But this research also shows that some patterns are easier to identify, suggesting that the development of human language may have been shaped by what infants could learn.

Contact: Jenny Saffran
jsaffran@facstaff.wisc.edu
608-262-9942
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Ecological effects of climate change include human epidemics
The link between climate and cholera, a serious health problem in many parts of the world, has become stronger in recent decades, according to a University of Michigan scientist who takes an ecological approach to understanding disease patterns.

Contact: Nancy Ross-Flanigan
rossflan@umich.edu
734-647-1853
University of Michigan

Showing releases 1-25 out of 121.

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