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Showing releases 26-50 out of 121.

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Research News Release

Public Release: 17-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
[Mis]understanding village abandonments
Empty and abandoned, the well-preserved ancient dwellings of Pueblo people give the impression of a suddenly vanished society. Where did they go? Recent findings in the Southwest's Mesa Verde region reveal that the Native Americans who lived there actually moved within the region on a regular basis--they migrated into and out of the area many times during their centuries-long occupation, scientists said today at the 2003 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientists urge managers to limit use of destructive fishing gears
Research presented today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting shows that many fishermen, conservationists, and academics, despite frequent conflict over fisheries issues, agree that bottom trawling -- a common method to catch shrimp, fish, and other bottom dwelling sea life -- is the most ecologically damaging fishing gear.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Methane and mini-horses: Fossils reveal effects of global warming
How will global warming affect life on Earth? Uncertainties about future climate change and the impact of human activity make it difficult to predict exactly what lies ahead.

Contact: Nancy Ross-Flanigan
rossflan@umich.edu
734-647-1853
University of Michigan

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Lessons from abroad: United States trails Europe in dependence on renewable energy
As the world's only remaining superpower, the United States is often at the cutting edge of science and technology, but according to researchers at the AAAS meeting today, the Europeans have far outdone the Americans in developing new sources of renewable energy and a sound environmental policy.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Study shows strong association between academic collaboration and scientific publishing productivity
Academic scientists and engineers have long been encouraged to collaborate on research projects and papers, but until recently little information has existed about the benefits of these interactions. A new Georgia Institute of Technology study provides strong evidence that academic collaboration really does pay off in improved scientific productivity.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: John Toon
john.toon@edi.gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology Research News

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Microbial forensics: An overview (news briefing and symposium)
On the popular television shows involving crime-scene-investigation units in Las Vegas and Miami, small traces of just about anything have been found and used to reel in criminal confessions. Note, however, viewers don't see the cases in court. The real world, says microbiologist Abigail Salyers of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is just now coming to grips with the world of microbial evidence.

Contact: Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
b-james3@uiuc.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
New strategies against disease revealed as scientists probe genes' tasks
A combination of genomics and computing technologies has produced exciting new leads for improving human health and understanding the basic processes of life, scientists said today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Technological advances making life easier for people with physical and mental challenges
Screen displays that deliver the written word to people who are sight-impaired, the latest ear implants for those who are deaf, and tools for individuals with mental challenges are on the cusp of a major technological revolution, paralleled by a growing aging population.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Sex and gender scientists explore a revolution in evolution
At the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, leading researchers and theorists in the evolution of sexual behavior will gather to present the growing evidence that Darwin's idea of sexual selection requires sweeping revisions. ''I don't have a theory to address it all by any means,'' says Stanford biologist Joan Roughgarden, who organized the Feb. 17 symposium. ''I'm just trying to get the extent of diversity on the table.''
Stanford University

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Fossil plant and insect communities key to understanding global change
Insect damage recorded in fossil plants and the types of plants present in the fossil record are helping researchers to understand how ecological communities recover from climate change and mass extinction events, according to a Penn State paleontologist and his colleagues.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Predicting the climate of the 21st century
Warming land and ocean surfaces, melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and other recent evidence strongly suggest that Earth's climate is already changing rapidly because of the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, according to Warren Washington, senior scientist and head of the Climate Change Research Group at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Computer models of Earth's climate support these observations, he says, and indicate more severe changes yet to come.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anatta
anatta@ucar.edu
303-497-8604
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Computer models forecast sharp increase in temperature if heat-trapping emissions continue to rise
Powerful computer models predict that winter temperatures in the polar regions of the world could rise as much as 10 degrees centigrade in the next hundred years, if no efforts are made to control production of carbon dioxide, methane and other gasses.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stanford researchers identify genes involved in tuberculosis latency
Stanford University Medical Center researchers have begun to understand how Mycobacterium tuberculosis orchestrates its impeccably timed game of hide-and-seek. Gary Schoolnik, MD, professor of medicine and of microbiology and immunology at Stanford's School of Medicine, will make a presentation Sunday in Denver at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The session is called "The Future of Functional Genomics II."

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Forensics – bringing bacteria into the courtroom
Scientists at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) warn that evidence of bioterrorism will not be admissible unless researchers develop new molecular methods, such as genome sequencing, and adopt standardized methods and data.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Meeting the nitrogen management challenge: Arresting the nitrogen cascade
In order to meet future need and preserve the environment, new strategies and opportunities for improved nitrogen management must be developed, scientists said today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Genebanks: Preserving genetic diversity for Earth's future
Endangered species protection programs, zoos, and plant conservatories work to preserve the Earth's animal and plant population, but in order to preserve the richness of biological diversity, alternatives such as gene banking must be used, scientist said today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6400
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Symposium explores microbial forensics and the investigation of biocrimes
"Microbial Forensics: A Scientific Assessment," a symposium at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Denver, CO, will address the systems, methods and technologies required for the successful investigation of biocrimes that could be directed against individuals, institutions, livestock and crops.

Contact: Andrea Lohse
alohse@asmusa.org
202-942-9292
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Dealing with reams of data
Using Web-based tools they developed to sift through reams of data, scientists from the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins hope to unravel the genetics of neurological problems associated with Down syndrome, autism and lead poisoning.

Contact: Joanna Downer
jdowner1@jhmi.edu
410-614-5105
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Livermore engineers use computer simulations to illustrate impacts of bomb blasts on infrastructure
Using advanced computing capabilities, engineers from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will illustrate some of the issues that arise when mitigating the effects of bomb blast on the constructed environment.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Study of living eye in real time now possible with optics technology
A new optics technology is providing scientists with real-time microscopic images of the living retina, and may allow doctors to focus in on earlier diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as diabetes and glaucoma. University of Houston researchers are using a technology called adaptive optics to peer inside the eyes of human subjects and for the first time get clear, sharp images of features such as blood flow in the eye's retina.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Amanda Siegfried
asiegfried@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
From kissing frogs to demonic possession, people are led to believe they experienced the improbable
During a recent study of memory recall and the use of suggestive interviewing, UC Irvine cognitive psychologist Elizabeth Loftus successfully planted false memories in volunteers of several study groups -- memories that included such unlikely events as kissing frogs, shaking hands with Bugs Bunny at Disneyland, and witnessing a demonic possession.

Contact: Lori Brandt
lbrandt@uci.edu
949-824-5484
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 16-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Tufts civil engineer predicts Boston's rising sea levels could cause billions of dollars in damage
Scientists presented their research on the impact of rising sea levels due to climate change on the Boston metro area to the annual AAAS meeting, showing that over the next century, flood damage to residential, commercial and industrial buildings in metropolitan Boston could exceed $20 billion, depending on how the city responds to rising sea levels. Costs could run as high as $94 billion, if climate weather conditions are more severe than expected.
US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Craig LeMoult
craig.lemoult@hotmail.com
617-627-4317
Tufts University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Laser-pulse technique could aid drug design
Drug design and testing for a variety of neurological disorders could now advance more rapidly thanks to a laser-based technique to study signal transmission between cells of the nervous system developed by a Cornell University biochemist.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Roger Segelken
hrs2@cornell.edu
607-255-9736
Cornell University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Los Alamos makes first map of ice on Mars
Lurking just beneath the surface of Mars is enough water to cover the entire planet ankle-deep, says Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist Bill Feldman.

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
jdanneskiold@lanl.gov
505-667-1640
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Tension between atomic secrecy and scholarship continues
The secrecy created by the inventors of the atom bomb and later written into law by Congress continues to fascinate and frustrate historians, says Los Alamos National Laboratory archivist Roger Meade.

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
jdanneskiold@lanl.gov
505-667-1640
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-50 out of 121.

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