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Showing releases 51-75 out of 121.

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Research News Release

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
World’s leading journal editors urge self-governance and responsibility ...
Thirty-two of the world's leading journal editors and scientist-authors today called for renewed vigilance and personal responsibility among their ranks whenever potentially "dangerous" research is presented for publication.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
From da Vinci to Monet: Understanding how artists can manipulate the human visual system
Put away those sunglasses, because the heat and brightness depicted in the fiery Impressionist sun is nothing but an illusion, a well-kept secret of knowing artists, from Monet to da Vinci. And, by the way, yes, Mona Lisa is hiding something underneath her smile.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
DuPont science leader discusses 'Sustainability and Integrated Science for the 21st Century'
DuPont Central Research and Development Vice President Dr. Uma Chowdhry will deliver today the topical lecture "Sustainability and Integrated Science for the 21st Century," at the AAAS meeting. "Historically, the chemical industry has grown in response to worldwide demand for products for improved standard of living," Chowdhry said. "This industry growth has been achieved through increased use of fossil fuel and other depletable natural resources. But that is changing. At DuPont, we're transforming to grow sustainably, increasing societal value while reducing our environmental footprints."

Contact: Anthony Farina
anthony.r.farina@usa.dupont.com
302-774-4114
DuPont

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stanford biomedical ethicist speaks on role of race in scientific research
Is racial profiling OK in a research setting? Is categorizing groups of people based on genetic characteristics acceptable? These are some of the questions that researchers, led by Mildred Cho, PhD, senior research scholar at the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, will tackle during a symposium at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Denver.

Contact: Michelle Brandt
mbrandt@stanford.edu
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
New studies reveal connections between oceanographic processes and rockfish populations
For years, scientists have had little knowledge of the processes and patterns involved in the dispersal of rockfish larvae and their eventual return as juveniles to their nearshore habitat. Now, researchers at UC Santa Cruz are working out the details of the oceanographic conditions that determine how and when juvenile rockfish return to the kelp beds. New instruments that reveal thin layers of ocean water along the coast are playing a key role in this effort.
Packard Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Marine biologists probe 'black box' mysteries of the sea
New studies conducted in coastal waters from California to the Caribbean are forcing marine scientists to abandon long-held assumptions about life in the ocean and how best to protect it.

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Time flies
With fresh approaches to quantum gravity, the big questions about the beginning of the universe and the possibility of time and space as particles--once thought "existential in nature"--are now seriously being considered. Einstein's theory of relativity might not be completely accurate, according to physicist Fotini Markopoulo Kalamara with the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, who will present a topical lecture today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Talking to the animals?
As the late novelist Joseph Conrad once suggested, people may indeed have more in common with vocal-learning birds like songbirds and parrots than we have previously assumed.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
New research tools are opening the 'black box' of coastal ecosystems
Characterized by unimaginably complex, three-dimensional currents and sharp, shallow reefs too hazardous for oceanographers to navigate, coastal ecosystems have traditionally been a mysterious "black box." But, at least four emerging research tools in oceanography and marine ecology are now opening new doors to shed light on coastal ecosystems, researchers noted in a peer-reviewed article forthcoming in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, the journal of the Ecological Society of America.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Noting that Western science could learn from students
In a dramatic effort to increase the numbers of Native Americans in the sciences, a tribal college in Washington State has transformed its science curriculum, inviting Native American elders to the school to give lectures and taking students on field trips into their own communities, as well as to museums, aquariums and national parks.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS 'goes Hollywood' to dramatize the perils of communicating science in a pressure cooker
It may look like just another Saturday Night Live episode, but it's really a symposium at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Instead of actors, these skits will feature academics, a congresswoman and a journalist, arguing on stage to illustrate the problems of scientific publishing. Science Editor Donald Kennedy will participate in the symposium "HYPE! The Greatest Symposium Ever!! - Communicating Science in a Pressure Cooker."

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Genetics may help solve mysteries of human evolution
By 100,000 years ago, Homo sapiens had evolved on the African continent. For 50,000 years, they were confined there and behaved just like H. neanderthalensis inhabiting parts of Europe and H. erectus living in Asia. Then their behavior changed dramatically. Stanford Professor Richard Klein has a controversial explanation: ''I think there was a biological change - a genetic mutation of some kind that promoted the fully modern ability to create and innovate.''
Stanford University

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientist looks at less to find out more about quantum materials
At very low temperatures, classical physics fails to explain phenomena at tiny scales. This is when quantum mechanics kicks in. Scientists are now chilling materials to study the behavior of electrons in the smallest discrete building blocks of matter. Then they are looking at those materials in reduced dimensions, which confine the flow of electrons, to study novel quantum states. ''Usually you get new physics when you impose confinement,'' says Stanford Professor Aharon Kapitulnik.
Stanford University

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Fires, floods, and freezes: New ways to keep disaster at bay
What can be done when wildland fire scorches the urban frontier, a hurricane soaks eroded hillsides, or an ice storm hits a major travel hub? Each of these sobering scenarios is being examined in new ways. Using end-to-end analysis, scientists are looking at each point and each participant in the chains of events that can turn a natural hazard into human catastrophe.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anatta
anatta@ucar.edu
303-497-8604
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Barn owls steer Stanford researcher to clues about visual and auditory mapping
Early experiences don't just change what an animal learns and remembers; these experiences can shape the structure and function of the adult brain. Eric Knudsen, PhD, the Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor of Neurobiology at Stanford University Medical Center, will discuss this during a talk at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Denver. His talk is titled "The Effects of Early Experience on Brain and Brain Development."

Contact: Amy Adams
amyadams@stanford.edu
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stanford researcher advocates far-reaching microarray data exchange
Gavin Sherlock, PhD, director of the Stanford Microarray Database at Stanford University Medical Center, will discuss the history of gene microarray databases and the current movement - in which he is active - to establish standards for the open publication and exchange of microarray data. His presentation will take place Saturday during the Databases and Data Sharing program at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Denver.

Contact: Sara Selis
selis@stanford.edu
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Supermarket shelves stocking food safety issues along with variety
As quickly as mangoes and sushi have won a spot in the world's hearts and grocery stores, the way food safety is – or isn't – ensured across the globe has changed radically, a Michigan State University scientist says. Governments no longer are the primary gatekeepers of the safety of a food supply that has grown internationally more diverse and exotic. Consumers increasingly will rely on those selling food to keep it safe.

Contact: Lawrence Busch
lawrence.busch@ssc.msu.edu
517-355-3396
Michigan State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Allergen-free shrimp? seafood marks a place in food safety research
A buffet of shrimp cocktail, lobster on the half shell, and king crab sounds like a seafood dream come true, but for people with shellfish-food allergies, it can be a nightmare instead. Now, new genetic studies show promise for putting allergen-free shrimp on our dinner plates someday, scientists said today at the 2003 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Opening the ‘black box’: Scientists gain new tools to learn about the near-shore environment
A group of scientists is putting together a picture of what until now has been a black box –– the near-shore ocean environment. At the same time, they are developing a picture of where marine animals live in the different parts of their life cycle. The information is invaluable to marine reserve planners, the fishing industry and many others.

Contact: Gail Gallessich
gail.g@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
How postnatal experience influences brain development and brain function
Fragile X syndrome and schizophrenia represent vastly different abnormalities of the brain, but they provide functionally similar examples of what happens when wiring processes go awry, neuroscientist William T. Greenough said today at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Jim Barlow
b-james3@uiuc.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Integration of agriculture, medicine requires new ways of thinking
As the links between foods and human health become ever clearer, so does the necessity of integrating gene-based agricultural and medical sciences research, according to Charles Muscoplat, dean of the University of Minnesota College of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences.

Contact: Deane Morrison
morri029@umn.edu
612-624-2346
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 15-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientists crack the black box of coastal ecosystems
Scientists along the coasts of Washington, Oregon and California have cracked the black box of coastal ecosystems, revealing the inner workings of the near-shore marine environment by working on a scale from microscopic fish larvae to the 1200 mile long California. Currently, an interdisciplinary team of over 100 ecologists, oceanographers, geneticists and engineers is beginning to answer some of the most urgent questions about how to predict and manage coastal ecosystems and marine populations.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, National Oceanographic Partnership Program

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Los Alamos researcher quantifies meteor false alarm rate for nuclear test monitoring system
A Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher is helping to provide an extra measure of confidence in an international array of listening posts that keep an ear out for clandestine nuclear weapons tests.

Contact: James Rickman
jamesr@lanl.gov
505-665-9203
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
'Selfish routing' slows the Internet
Just as in traffic jams, "Selfish routing" slows down everyone on the Internet, including those who try to find faster routes, according to Cornell University computer scientists.

Contact: Bill Steele
ws21@cornell.edu
607-255-7164
Cornell University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Artificial worlds unlock secrets of real human interaction
A powerful new tool, agent-based modeling, looks for elementary principles of self-organization that might shed new light on long-standing puzzles about how humans interact, Cornell sociologist Michael Macy tells a Feb. 14 session at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Denver.

Contact: Roger Segelken
hrs2@cornell.edu
607-255-9736
Cornell University

Showing releases 51-75 out of 121.

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