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Showing releases 76-100 out of 121.

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Research News Release

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Clock tells time at such speed that reading it becomes challenge
The newest atomic clock is so accurate that its creators theorize that it will neither lose nor gain a second in 4.5 billion years. And, they note that their clock is so promising, it's being tested for use in navigating Global Positioning System satellites and to time minute biological processes, such as protein folding.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Never too late to boogie: Nerve cells still active in 'mature' brain
Films that offer the mind a chance to watch the brain at work will be shown during a 14 February panel discussion at the AAAS Annual Meeting titled, "How and Why Brain Cells Boogie: Motility in Neural Development."

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Bugs from the deep may be window into the origins of life -- on earth and beyond
Simple life forms are turning up in a surprising variety of below-ground environments, potentially making up 50 percent of the Earth's biomass, scientists said today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting. From South African gold mines, to cooled seafloor lavas, these subsurface bugs have provided clues to the potential for life on Mars, and the diversity of possible fuel sources for life, including nuclear energy and toxic waste.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Tribal warfare: Revenge, retaliation, deterrence
When a nation goes to war against another nation, it may be merely re-enacting an event as old as humanity itself, according to scientists at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting. But, judging from comparisons of rates of combat deaths, modern nation states have not been as war-like as traditional tribal societies, according to Lawrence Keeley, professor of anthropology, University of Illinois, Chicago.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamrelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Early Mars: Warm enough to melt water?
While some researchers believe that only asteroid collisions made Mars warm enough to have running rivers, a Penn State researcher believes the planet had to be warmed continuously to form Mars' deep valleys, but he does not know how the planet warmed up.
NASA

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Centralia, Pa., underground coal fire creeping forward
For those who have forgotten, Centralia Pa. is still burning underground and the fire front is still moving, but for a Penn State psychology undergraduate, Centralia became the focus of geologic research that broadened her interest in local history to include geology.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
New potential sites for Alzheimer's genes suggest a future of custom-designed treatment
Based on recent findings of 12 new potential sites for Alzheimer's genes, a leading researcher estimates that within 50 years, patients will be routinely screened for Alzheimer's Disease and receive prescription drugs tailored to their genetic risk.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6431
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Neglect during infancy can affect children for years, scientists report
Many children who were neglected in orphanages during the first months of their life encounter a distinct set of developmental challenges--lasting for years after they've been adopted by attentive parents, scientists said today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting. Biological insights into these difficulties may suggest ways to improve the lives of some troubled children, and shed light on how the brain develops in early childhood.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Why we are what we eat: New links between our biology and food choices
"Tell me what you eat, and I shall tell you what you are," wrote French gastronome Brillat-Savarin, in his 19th century tome, The Physiology of Taste. In the same spirit, scientists reported today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting that our biology plays a major role in determining our food choices.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Clothing from Corn: DuPont develops innovative process to create polymer from renewable resources
Clothing from cornfields? Researchers have developed an innovative bio-based method that uses corn -- instead of conventional petroleum-based processes -- to produce the latest polymer platform for use in clothing, carpets, and automobiles. Dr. Scott Nichols of DuPont will unveil the findings at the AAAS annual meeting with "Engineering E.coli for the Production of 1,3 Propanediol -- Creating DuPont Sorona(r) Polymer of the Future from Corn" from noon to 1:30 p.m. Feb. 14 at Workshop D (Convention Center: Exhibit Hall A).

Contact: Anthony Farina
anthony.r.farina@usa.dupont.com
302-774-4114
DuPont

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Revenge motivates tribal warfare
Probably the single most common motive mentioned by tribal warriors when asked why they go to war, is revenge, according to a Penn State anthropologist.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Merck/AAAS announce 2003 winners for outstanding Undergraduate Research Programs
The Merck Company Foundation and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) today announced winners of the 2003 awards for the Merck/AAAS Undergraduate Science Research Program. This year's winners are Birmingham-Southern College, Calvin College, College of Staten Island/CUNY, Davidson College, Earlham College, Gustavus Adolphus College, Illinois Wesleyan University, Lebanon Valley College, Marist College, State University College at Buffalo, State University of New York–Geneseo, University of Redlands, Viterbo University, Wheaton College, and Wilkes University.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Toxicogenomics provides insight on assigning breast cancer drugs
Toxicology is getting a facelift with an infusion of genomics and proteomics--and powerful computing--that will help researchers predict adverse effects to chemicals in the environment, as well as the effectiveness of drugs used to treat breast cancer patients.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Relapse or remission? Pharmacogenomics draws the fine line
Shortly after chemotherapy treatment, how does a doctor know if a cancer has responded favorably or not to the treatment, or if a patient is destined to develop drug toxicity--before it is too late? Recent work in the field of pharmacogenomics is working toward reducing that perplexity and making treatments more individualized for patients. Researchers present their latest advances today at the 2003 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
What to plant when the fires go out
The biggest bad guy in the West, at least to people who study plant life on the prairies, is an invasive species that crowds out native grasses, dies early in the growing season, and becomes fuel for the fires that tear across the region.

Contact: Monica Amarelor or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
NIH leader outlines future of U.S. medical research
Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D., director of the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), spoke of his vision for research and medical discovery in the 21st Century, during the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Part of The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, NIH is the principal funding source for biomedical research in the United States, and its funding decisions have a significant impact on medical research worldwide.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
New life discovered in deep ocean floor
Researchers from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory discovered new life and new insight into the microscopic creators of the planet's largest frozen methane pools, trapped within the ocean floor. The team, led by microbiologist Rich Colwell, has identified a what may be a new species of methanogen. Now, they're literally starving methane-producing microbes called methanogens, trying to develop realistic models of hydrate distribution and formation rate in seafloor sediments.
DOE/Office of Fossil Energy

Contact: Deborah Hill
dahill@inel.gov
208-526-4723
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Waging war: The curse of human intelligence
With America and its allies poised to attack Iraq and the U.S. and North Korea locked in a showdown over nuclear weapons, diplomats and politicians would do well to remember that humans may have nuclear technology but still only possess stone-age brains. This is often a lethal combination, says University of Maine anthropologist Paul Roscoe who will present a paper on tribal warfare in New Guinea today at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Denver.
National Science Foundation, Fulbright-Hays Area Studies Program, American Philosophical Society, University of Maine

Contact: Susan Young
susan.young@umit.maine.edu
207-581-3756
University of Maine

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Jefferson neuroscientists probing the power of light to influence human health
Neuroscientist George Brainard contends that light can both heal and harm. He should know. He has spent much of the past two decades trying to understand how the brain interprets, reacts to and uses light independently of the visual system. He and others at the Farber Institute for Neurosciences at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, for example, have clarified how the human eye uses light to regulate melatonin production - and the body's biological clock.

Contact: Steve Benowitz
steven.benowitz@mail.tju.edu
215-955-5291
Thomas Jefferson University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Orphanage experience alters brain development
During the last decade, many American families have opened their hearts and homes to children adopted from Eastern European orphanages. But after coming to the United States, these children often suffer from a set of developmental problems that affect their growth, learning and social interactions. By studying these children and the problems they face, researchers have developed a better understanding of how certain early childhood experiences can alter the development of the brain and, as result, also alter the development of particular skills or abilities.

Contact: Seth Pollak
spollak@wisc.edu
608-265-8190
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Adverse experiences in early childhood cause brain adaptations that can lead to later disorders
Adverse experiences both perinatally and during early childhood, including abuse, neglect and severe medical illness, can have both immediate and long-term consequences on the development of the central nervous system, according to accumulating research in rodents and primates.
Silvio O. Conte Center for the Neuroscience of Mental Disease, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Ron Sauder
404-727-3366
Emory University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Most Americans open to pharmacogenomics research
A nationwide survey has shown that nearly 80 percent of Americans are likely to participate in pharmacogenomics research even though they don't fully understand how it may affect them.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Denise Fitzpatrick
denise.fitzpatrick@louisville.edu
502-852-6171
University of Louisville

Public Release: 14-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
Color key to presentation of understandable scientific data
The scientific establishment is drowning in data, but whether it is census data or the vast amounts of satellite and computer-generated information created every day, visual representation and the use of color can help scientists understand and extract important patterns from this deluge, according to a Penn State cartographer.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 13-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
The frontier of microelectronics: Building nano-machines, part by part
Nanocomputers, higher resolution screens, and millibots? What kinds of gadgets will the next generation of innovation bring? The answer to questions like these depend on nanotechnology, a rapidly developing field that crosses a spectrum of sciences with studies at the nano-scale, smaller than a human cell. Leading scientists in the field of nanotechnology will be discussing recent developments in microelectronics, at the 2003 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo or Ginger Pinholster
mamarelo@aaas.org
303-228-8301
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2003
2003 AAAS Annual Meeting
European research at AAAS meeting
For the first time the European Commission, the executive arm of the European Union, is represented at an AAAS annual meeting. This is the latest step in a growing cooperation between the European Commission's research department and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Director General Achilleas Mitsos will give a topical lecture on European research policy on February. 16. The European Commission's research policy and funding activities will also be showcased at the European Commission booth in the exhibition area.

Contact: Stéphane Hogan
stephane.hogan@cec.eu.int
917-681-9005
European Commission's Research Directorate-General

Showing releases 76-100 out of 121.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

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