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Showing releases 1-25 out of 123.

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Research News Releases

Public Release: 18-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Citizens, scientists and policymakers debate ways to restore ocean health at AAAS Town Hall Meeting
Marine scientists, Seattle citizens and politicians debated the best ways to restore the ocean's health at a town hall meeting sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science's Center for Public Engagement with Science and Technology for several hours today.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6421
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stem cells found in adults may repair nerves
It used to be considered dogma that a nerve, once injured, could never be repaired. Now, researchers have learned that some nerves, even nerves in parts of the brain, can regenerate or be replaced.

Contact: Walter Neary
wneary@u.washington.edu
206-685-3841
University of Washington

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
'Evo-devo' biology tackles evolutionary history's unanswered questions
The recent marriage of evolutionary biology with developmental biology has resulted in the birth of a new field, evolutionary developmental biology, or "evo-devo." One of the field's creators, Indiana University Bloomington biologist Rudolf Raff will discuss how evo-devo will expand our understanding of the fossil record.

Contact: David Bricker
brickerd@indiana.edu
812-856-9035
Indiana University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Climatic Change
Global warming to squeeze western mountains dry by 2050
A 70 percent reduction in West Coast mountain snow cover will lead to increased fall and winter flooding, severe spring and summer drought that will play havoc with the West's agriculture, fisheries and hydropower industry. "And this is a best case scenario," says the forecast's chief modeler, L. Ruby Leung, a staff scientist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Bill Cannon
cannon@pnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Statistical technique helps researchers gain more information from a single data run
For certain classes of data that may be very expensive or difficult to obtain, a new statistical technique may provide useful information from a single data run by allowing meaningful re-sampling. The technique, known as "wavelet bootstrapping" or "wavestrapping," has applications in the geophysical sciences, bioinformatics, medical imaging, nanotechnology and other areas. It can also be useful for rapidly obtaining information from small data sets in such applications as medical diagnostics.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Toon
john.toon@edi.gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology Research News

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Athletics, genetic enhancement and ethics
Combining genetic manipulation and weight training in rats yields leg muscles that are bigger and stronger than the muscles of rats exposed to just one of these two muscle-building techniques, according to a new study. These findings will frame a discussion at the 2004 AAAS (Triple-A-S) Annual Meeting on potential uses of genetic enhancement in competitive sports, from the perspective of athletic organizations, athletes, scientists, and ethicists.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mouth microbes may help shape immune system, says Stanford research team
The immune system may be shaped by some of the very agents it exists to fight, according to research by David Relman, MD, associate professor of medicine and of microbiology and immunology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Relman will present an overview of his lab's work on this subject, along with some new findings Feb. 16 as part of the "Innate Immunity and Oral Health" program at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Seattle.

Contact: Mitzi Baker
mitzibaker@stanford.edu
650-725-2106
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Most clones doomed from the start, according to Temple University embryologist
Until scientists can improve the early development of cloned embryos, cloning will remain marginally successful, according to research presented today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Currently, only 1-5 percent of cloned embryos succeed, and many that do succeed are unhealthy.

Contact: Eryn Jelesiewicz
eryn.jelesiewicz@temple.edu
215-707-0730
Temple University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Relearning to hear
Mario Svirsky and his Indiana University School of Medicine colleagues tested whether a training regimen that gradually introduced subjects to the frequency shift could improve their ability to comprehend speech.

Contact: Eric Schoch
eschoch@iupui.edu
317-274-8205
Indiana University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Recession's silver lining? More top students head to grad school
The recent slump prompted top U.S. college graduates to hunker down in graduate school, sharply reversing a trend from the 1990s.

Contact: William Zumeta
zumeta@u.washington.edu
206-543-0743
University of Washington

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Disease-fighters in our mouths provide clues to enhancing the immune system
Studies of natural antibiotics in our mouths may lead to new treatments for oral infections, as well as ways to boost the infection-fighting powers of mouthwashes, denture coatings, and wound dressings.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Walter Neary
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Radioactive and toxic waste site plans are a recipe for disaster, says Rutgers sociologist
Federal government plans for more than 100 radioactive and toxic waste sites are fantasy and wishful thinking, says world-renowned disaster expert Lee Clarke. The Long Term Stewardship program as a hopeful projection of what experts and organizations want to happen in the future, while ignoring worst-case scenarios.

Contact: Joseph Blumberg
blumberg@ur.rutgers.edu
732-932-7084 x652
Rutgers University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Improved medical treatment of serious heart problems focus of UH-led group
Suncica Canic, University of Houston mathematics professor, and her research group are presenting new findings related to the medical treatment of two serious heart problems at the AAAS annual meeting in Seattle at 8 a.m. P.S.T., Monday, Feb. 16. The main goal of her work is to help cardiologists gain deeper insight into the behavior of vascular prostheses, called stents, used in the treatment of aortic abdominal aneurysm and in coronary angioplasty.

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
New X-ray sources speed protein crystallography
Cornell physics professor Sol Gruner says that high-powered synchrotron X-ray sources and advanced detectors have been largely responsible for the advent of structural studies in protein crystallography.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Brand
deb27@cornell.edu
607-255-3651
Cornell University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
NSF puts priority on attracting and educating a skilled, diverse science and engineering workforce
National Science Foundation (NSF) Director Rita Colwell will kick off a two-day Forum for School Science at the AAAS Annual Meeting on Feb. 15, with remarks emphasizing the importance of collaborations between working scientists and engineers and schoolteachers and their students.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Philip Lippel
plippel@nsf.gov
703-292-7741
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Models help estimate children's exposure to toxins
For almost 10 years, Stanford's Jim Leckie and his students have been successfully collecting immense amounts of data, writing original software and building sophisticated statistical models - all to begin to measure how children are exposed to chemicals in their environments. Leckie will speak Feb. 16 at the AAAS meeting.
US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Institute, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Tools to guide and switch light for photonic microchips
Cornell professor Michal Lipson has developed new tools for making photonic microchips, in which electrons in wires are replaced by beams of light, including ways to guide , bend and switch light and to connect nanophotonic chips to optical fiber.

Contact: Contact: Bill Steele
ws21@cornell.edu
607-255-7164
Cornell University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Human evolution at the crossroads: Integrating genetics and paleontology
Advances in genetics during the last decade not only have influenced modern medicine, they also have changed how human evolution is studied, says an anthropologist from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who is calling for an integration of paleontology and genetics.

Contact: Jim Barlow, Life Sciences Editor
jebarlow@staff.uiuc.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
From football conferences to food webs: U-M researcher uncovers patterns in complicated networks
The world is full of complicated networks that scientists would like to better understand---human social systems, for example, or food webs in nature. But discerning patterns of organization in such vast, complex systems is no easy task.

Contact: Nancy Ross-Flanigan
rossflan@umich.edu
734-647-1853
University of Michigan

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Traditional Iroquois methods work for today's farmers
Jane Mt. Pleasant, professor of horticulture and director of the American Indian Program at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., is mining her Iroquois heritage for planting and cultivation methods that work for today's farmers.

Contact: David Brand
deb27@cornell.edu
607-255-3651
Cornell University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Media-fueled bias distorts validity of recovered memories
People who say they've recently recovered long buried memories of sex abuse are less likely to be believed than those who've always been able to recall events, says Jennifer Freyd, University of Oregon professor of psychology. Freyd will present her findings and comment on errors often made in news coverage of research on memory for childhood abuse on Sunday, Feb. 15, 2004, at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting in Seattle.

Contact: Melody Ward Leslie
mleslie@uoregon.edu
541-346-3134
University of Oregon

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Rutgers researcher offers a new perspective on human evolution
Chi-Hua Chiu introduces and emerging perspective in the study of human origins: the underlying developmental and genetic processes that led to evolutionary changes.

Contact: Joseph Blumberg
blumberg@ur.rutgers.edu
732-932-7084 x652
Rutgers University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Cutting-edge oceanography helps scientists understand climate change on Earth (and other planets)
The deep ocean seems as remote as the surface of the moon. But it may play a vital role in determining how the Earth's climate responds to increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide. At the AAAS annual meeting, two MBARI scientists present talks that link the ocean to global climate change. A third MBARI scientist will explain how new tools illuminate ocean processes on Earth and possibly other planets.

Contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett
kfb@mbari.org
831-775-1835
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Research on tiniest particles could have far-reaching effects
Neutrinos are about the tiniest things in existence, but a University of Washington physicst working at the forefront of neutrino research believes that developing a greater understanding of what they are and how they function is likely to have a huge impact in the next few years.

Contact: Vince Stricherz
vinces@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Where to start to launch the 'butterfly effect'
Sociologists postulate that what a few influential leaders think and say can spread and grow and bring about big changes in the thinking of large numbers of people. Cornell University Computer scientists have some suggestions on how to find those people by studying the structure of a network.

Contact: Bill Steele
ws21@cornell.edu
607-255-7164
Cornell University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 123.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

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