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Showing releases 101-123 out of 123.

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Research News Releases

Public Release: 12-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
New study suggests brains of autistic children can be trained to recognize faces
Individuals with autism have been shown to have a difficult time recognizing faces, but two University of Washington researchers now suggest that the problem may be due to a lack of practice, rather than to abnormal functioning of the affected region of the brain.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Study of dyslexic brain finds three word forms responsible for reading success
Researchers at the AAAS (Triple-A-S) Annual Meeting reveal new findings on effective therapeutic approaches for dyslexia, confirming that the brains of individuals with the reading disorder can be made to read normally; the instructional therapy is informed by findings of genetic research. AAAS is the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Dyslexics not doomed to life of reading difficulties
Even though there is evidence that dyslexia has a genetic basis, researchers will report new findings today (February 12) that show children afflicted with the learning disability are not doomed to a life of reading difficulties. The brains of dyslexics can be "jump-started" to help them read normally using a three-week-long intervention to use the same brain areas as normal readers, leading to better reading ability.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Joel Schwarz
joels@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 12-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Anthropologist proposes link between per capita energy use and fertility rate
As world reserves of oil and natural gas dwindle over the coming decades - a prospect predicted by many energy experts - the rate at which the people in most societies around the world have babies is likely to drop precipitously as well. That is the prediction of anthropologist Virginia Abernethy, professor emerita of psychiatry at Vanderbilt University.

Contact: David F. Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 12-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
New technologies reveal mysteries of marine megafauna
At a AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science) press conference on Thursday, February 12th at 1pm and in a scientific session on Friday morning, leading researchers will reveal how the latest technologies are allowing scientists to understand animals in the global ocean at a scale and resolution never before possible. Their findings are providing exciting, new opportunities to conserve these animals by working with fishermen and fisheries managers.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 12-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Special training may help people with autism recognize faces
Scientists trying to understand and treat autism have discovered that the brains of people with autism function differently than those of normal people when they view pictures of unfamiliar people. However, when people with autism look at a picture of a very familiar faces, such as their mother's, their brain activity is similar to that ofcontrol subjects. This seems to indicate that the brains of people with autism have the ptoential to function normally but may need special training.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Cure Autism Now Foundation

Contact: Joel Schwarz
joels@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 12-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
It all adds up: Mathematical model shows which couples will divorce
There are no general laws of human relationships as there are for physics, but a leading marital researcher and a group of applied mathematicians have teamed up to create a mathematical model that predicts which couples will divorce with astonishing accuracy.

Contact: Joel Schwarz
joels@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 11-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Human embryonic stem cells may promise medical advances
New research may be a first step toward methods for treating diabetes, osteoarthritis, Parkinson's and other diseases, by producing replacement cells unlikely to trigger immune-system rejection.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 9-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Symposium focuses on unique challenges of environmental pathogens
A symposium sponsored by the American Academy of Microbiology, "From Outside to Inside: Environmental Microorganisms as Human Pathogens," to be held at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) will examine issues that are vital to current research on environmental pathogens.

Contact: Mimi Godfrey
mgodfrey@asmusa.org
202-942-9292
American Society for Microbiology

Grant Announcements

Public Release: 12-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Gates Foundation commits $82.9 million to develop new tuberculosis vaccines
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation announced today an $82.9 million grant to the Aeras Global TB Vaccine Foundation to support development of new vaccines to prevent tuberculosis, a disease that kills nearly two million people every year. The grant, the largest ever for TB vaccine development, will allow Aeras to fund human trials of promising TB vaccines and early research on the next generation of vaccines.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Patti Pierson
media@gatesfoundation.org
206-709-3400
Gates Foundation

Award Announcements

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Digging for truth in Guatemala
AAAS, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, helped train the first forensic anthropology team to exhume and examine thousands of Guatemala's dead, beginning in 1992. Unmarked graves in the Guatemalan highlands offer mute testimony to the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people--many of them Mayans--who were killed by military and paramilitary during the country's bloody civil war.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
USAMRIID scientist Peter B. Jahrling elected fellow by AAAS
Peter B. Jahrling of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) has been elected Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He is recognized for development of animal models using authentic smallpox, Ebola, and Lassa viruses leading to improved vaccines, antiviral drugs, and diagnostics. Jahrling began his USAMRIID career as an Army Captain and immunologist in 1972, and currently serves as Senior Research Scientist and principal scientific advisor.

Contact: Caree Vander Linden
Caree.Vander-Linden@amedd.army.mil
301-619-2285
US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 6-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Temple mathematician John Allen Paulos honored by AAAS for promoting understanding of science
In recognition of his being "one of the greatest mathematical storytellers of all time," AAAS will honor Temple University mathematician John Allen Paulos with the 2003 AAAS Award for Public Understanding of Science and Technology.

Contact: Preston M. Moretz
pmoretz@temple.edu
215-204-7476
Temple University

Public Release: 18-Dec-2003
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
John Allen Paulos receives prestigious AAAS Award for Public Understanding of S&T
For his tireless efforts to communicate the joy of mathematics to the public, Temple University Professor John Allen Paulos has been named to receive the highly coveted 2003 AAAS Award for Public Understanding of Science and Technology.
AAAS

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6431
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Dec-2003
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Dr. Walter Reich, Ph.D., receives prestigious AAAS 2003 Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award
For his advocacy against crimes against humanity and for his work promoting the responsible conduct of science, Walter Reich, champion of human rights and the Yitzhak Rabin Memorial Professor of International Affairs, Ethics and Human Behavior at George Washington University, has been named to receive the highly coveted American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 2003 Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award.
AAAS

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
202-326-6431
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 23-Nov-2003
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Hebrew University professor named fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science
Prof. Sason Shaik of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the association has announced.

Contact: Jerry Barach
jerryb@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82904
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Science Business News Releases

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
FIRST fellowship program proves worthy model for training faculty in biological sciences
The Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) program, a postdoctoral fellowship program that combines training in research and teaching within a five-school Atlanta consortium has successfully launched faculty careers in the biological sciences for 8 of its graduates and is continuing to train 31 current fellows.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ron Sauder
rsauder@emory.edu
404-727-3366
Emory University Health Sciences Center

Meeting Announcements

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Nuclear waste dumps need better stewardship, says expert
Freudenburg, a professor of environmental studies and sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, will chair a session on the challenges of long-term nuclear waste management at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Seattle on Monday, February 16, from 1-4 p.m.

Contact: Gail Gallessich
gail.g@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 16-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Symposium explores 'Scientific Integrity in Policy Contexts'
Is selection of members for scientific advisory committees based on their political stance contaminating the Federal scientific advisory process? A symposium at the 2004 AAAS annual meeting explores whether the assumption that policy biases should be balanced is at odds with the idea of scientific objectivity.

Contact: Susan Trulove
strulove@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Anti-interferon beta antibodies in MS care: A consensus
The advent of biologics (protein-based medications) has benefited countless patients with chronic diseases. However, there has been an unexpected consequence: the development of NAbs, in which the body perceives protein-based therapies to be foreign and mounts an immune response against them. As treatment with biologics increases, the hot debate continues about whether NAbs are just innocent immunological bystanders or a natural defense mechanism that diminishes the efficacy of biologic therapies.

Contact: Cindy Gessell
cindy.gessell@ketchum.com
201-652-4778
Ketchum UK

Public Release: 10-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Public Science Day brings new experiences to Seattle students
On 12 February, Shirley Malcom, Director of Education and Human Resources at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) will join more than 1,000 Seattle public school students for Public Science Day, launching the annual meeting of the world's largest general society of scientists.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Free, public events at the 2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Families with children, job seekers, teachers and anyone with a curious mind are invited to check out the free, public events at the AAAS (Triple-A-S) Annual Meeting, 12-16 February, in Seattle, Washington. A summary of free AAAS events is provided below. Look for details online at http://www.aaas.org/meetings/.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-3660
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 5-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
2004 AAAS annual meeting spotlights world health, oceans and family science
Ocean and world-health headlines, plus family science -- from hair-raising electricity to "Oobleck" demos -- promise something for everyone at the 2004 AAAS Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 101-123 out of 123.

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