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Showing releases 26-50 out of 123.

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Research News Releases

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Three personal ads for physics
Strong, dynamic, grounded-yet-abstract, animated, and relationship-oriented field of study in search of eager students for short- or long-term learning relationship. If so, then one of the advertisements written or videotaped by the participants in the "Pop Physics" symposium today at the 2004 AAAS (Triple-A-S) Annual Meeting may hook you on physics.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
A shrinking sink? Carbon fertilization may be flimsy weapon against warming
A growing body of evidence questions calculations by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that the land will automatically provide a significant, long-term carbon "sink" to offset some of the effects of greenhouse gas emissions. Scientists reported these findings today at the 2004 AAAS (Triple-A-S) Annual Meeting.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Breakthroughs in capacity, power consumption set to revolutionize photonics
For years, organic electro-optic polymers have held the promise of vastly improving technologies such as data processing and communications. Now scientists appear on the verge bringing dramatic progress in materials and devices, setting the stage for a virtual revolution.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Vince Stricherz
vinces@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS survey: 80 percent of adults say we're hurting oceans
Most adults believe that human activity is endangering the Earth's oceans, yet less than one-third feel empowered to influence positive change. This is a major finding of a national survey released today by AAAS, the world's largest general science society, in conjunction with a public town hall meeting on marine science issues.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Advances in equine cloning may aid insight into human diseases
Today at the 2004 AAAS (Triple-A-S) Annual Meeting, researcher Gordon L. Woods will discuss the relative healthiness of equine clones as opposed to the health of other cloned animals, asserting that "mules bridge the gap of science" since they are usually born sterile. AAAS is the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientists, lawyers discuss decision-making amid uncertainty
Throw into the pot a thorny scientific issue, some edgy policymakers and a few journalists seeking "balanced coverage," and what do you have? A recipe for confusion and policy gridlock. "In science, there are never two sides. There are multiple outcomes," says Stephen H. Schneider, a professor of biological sciences at Stanford University and a senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for International Studies.

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
831-915-0088
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Study shows how African-American Ph.D. chemists overcame discrimination to build careers
A national study of career experiences among African-American Ph.D. chemists shows how these scientists dealt with discriminatory practices and attitudes to build careers in academia, industry and government. While seven out of ten respondents felt they had been hindered by discrimination, less than a handful regretted choosing a career in chemistry.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Toon
john.toon@edi.gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology Research News

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
3D fabrication technique uses light-activated molecules to create complex microstructures
A three-dimensional microfabrication technique that uses a unique class of light-activated molecules to selectively initiate chemical reactions within polymers and other materials could provide an efficient way to produce complex structures with sub-micron features.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Toon
john.toon@edi.gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology Research News

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Carbon dioxide fertilization is neither boon nor bust
Trees absorb more carbon dioxide (CO2) when the amount in the atmosphere is higher, but the increase is unlikely to offset the higher levels of CO2, according to results from large-scale experiments conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and elsewhere.

Contact: Ron Walli
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Women faculty of color: Numbers are low, but new strategies offer hope for improvement
The numbers of women of color on academic faculties in the United States are very small and not increasing. There are even fewer such professors in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. And the implications of this deficit are far-reaching. But some strategies for improvement exist at both the individual and institutional levels, researchers say.

Contact: Jane Sanders
jane.sanders@edi.gatech.edu
404-894-2214
Georgia Institute of Technology Research News

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Adults and children develop gestures that mimic language
The ability to develop a form of communication that becomes an actual language is apparently innate, new University of Chicago research on the use of gestures among deaf children and experiments with adults shows.

Contact: William Harms
w-harms@uchicago.edu
773-702-8356
University of Chicago

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Training for science teachers should focus on learning, not teaching strategies
Three different professions -- science teachers, science-teacher educators, and university science faculty members -- should be involved in training science teachers for secondary schools. To improve science-teacher teacher training, place the programs within colleges of science and have science teachers help build and run the programs.

Contact: Debra Tomanek
dtomanek@u.arizona.edu
520-621-7380
University of Arizona

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Would you like a receipt with that election?
Stanford computer science Professor David Dill argues that electronic voting machines should print a paper copy of the ballot, which the voter can inspect and which can be used in the event of a recount. He will make the case for this ''voter-verifiable paper audit trail'' Feb. 15 at the AAAS meeting.
Stanford University

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Equine cloning's triple play sheds light on calcium, cell signaling, human disease
The successful cloning of three mules and their excellent health is important to the horse industry, a University of Idaho scientist said Monday at Seattle. More important is the potential human health aspects of the cloning project. Dr. Gordon Woods, UI professor of animal and veterinary science, said the work aided understanding of calcium's role in cell signaling and possibly in the progression of human disease.

Contact: Gordon Woods
gwoods@uidaho.edu
208-885-6507
University of Idaho

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Professor to describe 'uncanny physics of comic book superheroes'
Surprisingly, sometimes comic books get their physics right.

Contact: Deane Morrison
morri029@umn.edu
612-624-2346
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
New study may explain how fats damage neurons in Alzheimer's patients
Researchers studying alterations of cholesterol and another lipid in the brain cells of deceased individuals with Alzheimer's disease, suggest that they might someday be able affect the course of the disease by limiting the accumulation of those fats in the brain.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Parenting ethics panel explores thorny issues posed by technology
Advances in reproductive technologies have brought babies into the lives of thousands of yearning couples. Linda Giudice, MD, PhD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Stanford University School of Medicine, will delve into thorny issues during a panel discussion at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Seattle. The panel, called "Creating a World We Won't Want to Inhabit?" begins Feb. 15 at 2:30 p.m.

Contact: Michelle Brandt
mbrandt@stanford.edu
650-723-0272
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Duke open-air experiment results could deflate hopes that forests can alleviate global warming
A futuristic Duke University simulation of forest growth under the carbon dioxide-enriched atmosphere expected by 2050 does not reinforce the optimism of those who believe trees can absorb that extra CO2 by growing faster, said a spokesman for the experiment.

Contact: Monte Basgall
monte.basgall@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
The sensor revolution
In the 1990s, the Internet connected us to a planet-wide webof information-all the zillions of bits that are stored in computer memories and hard drives. But now, thanks to an ongoing revolution in highly miniaturized, wirelessly networked sensors, the Internet is reaching out into the physical world, as well.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Mitchell Waldrop
mwaldrop@nsf.gov
703-292-7752
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 15-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
1,136 scientists call for protection of deep-sea corals
At a AAAS press briefing on Sunday at 1:00 PM, marine scientists will release a consensus statement from over a thousand of the world's foremost biologists, calling for governments and the United Nations to protect imperiled deep-sea coral and sponge ecosystems.

Contact: Fan Tsao
fan@mcbi.org
206-669-8378
SeaWeb

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Feeling good about placebos
A Michigan State University medical ethicist believes giving a patient a placebo the old-fashioned way - using some kind of "dummy" medication - is deceptive and in most cases should not be done.

Contact: Tom Oswald
oswald@msu.edu
517-355-2281
Michigan State University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Highway to hydrogen: A long and winding road
Following the National Academy of Sciences criticism of the Bush administration's plans for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles last week, taxpayers are left wondering how realistic is the vision for a hydrogen economy, what kinds of approaches are scientists and engineers taking and just what are the technical hurdles involved. While the goals outlined and funded by the Department of Energy are aggressive, they're not unrealistically so, say researchers at DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Passwords to guard entry aren't enough to protect complex data
"Data can easily find itself in danger of being accessed by 'bad guys,'" says emeritus professor of computer science Gio Wiederhold, who will speak Feb. 14 at the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. "Passwords and other means of access control are okay, but additional security mechanisms are needed to provide security." To ensure that data records are not released into the wrong hands, Wiederhold suggests adding filters to outgoing data.
Stanford University

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Vaccine risk acceptance depends on what you do and don't know
In general, people in the United States view vaccines as safe. But that perception may change when questions are raised about what public health officials don't know about vaccines, research suggests. Risk perception and acceptability are also dependent on context - both personal and societal.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jane Sanders
jane.sanders@edi.gatech.edu
404-894-2214
Georgia Institute of Technology Research News

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Report identifies design principles for success in educating scientists and engineers
A new report defines what works to keep women and minorities in higher education on the path to careers in science and engineering.
Building Engineering and Science Talent

Contact: Brenda Sullivan
bsullivan@bestworkforce.org
858-945-4884
Building Engineering and Science Talent

Showing releases 26-50 out of 123.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

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