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Showing releases 51-75 out of 123.

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Research News Release

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
How well do scientists communicate with the public about vaccine safety?
Paul A. Offit, MD, Director of the Vaccine Education Center and Chief of Infectious Diseases at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, is an internationally prominent expert on vaccine safety. Dr. Offit will address "Science, Politics and the Media" during the panel on Public Perception of Vaccine Risks at the AAAS Vaccine Seminar. He will discuss how scientists convey findings to the public, using the case of the discredited link between autism and the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine.

Contact: John Ascenzi
Ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Landowners' pursuit of different land-use strategies may confound policymakers
A burgeoning human population has put increasing pressure on the world's land, so smart land-use strategies that prevent hunger, support economies and preserve ecological diversity are now more critical than ever. Indiana University Bloomington have discovered differences in land-use strategies in Indiana and Brazil that lead to a heterogeneous landscape, which may complicate future policymaking decisions.

Contact: Ryan Piurek
rpiurek@indiana.edu
812-855-5393
Indiana University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Computer scientists develop tool for mining genomic data
Equipped with cutting-edge techniques to track the activity of tens of thousands of genes in a single experiment, biologists now face a new challenge - determining how to analyze this tidal wave of data. Stanford Associate Professor of Computer Science Daphne Koller and her colleagues have come to the rescue with a strategic approach that reduces the trial-and-error aspect of genetic sequence analysis.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
National ocean commissioners & scientists call for overhaul of ocean policies & management
At a AAAS press conference in Seattle on February 14th, at 12:00 noon PT, leaders from both the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy and the Pew Oceans Commission will come together for the first time to discuss their findings on our nation's oceans.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
HUPO scientists tackle human blood plasma proteome
U-M scientist Gilbert Omenn directs the Human Plasma Proteome Project, one of several initiatives organized by the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO). At this year's AAAS meeting, Omenn will present an update on the Plasma Proteome Project's current status and discuss the challenges of comparing data from different laboratories.

Contact: Sally Pobojewski
pobo@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Anthrax spores can germinate, grow and reproduce in soil
For Bacillus anthracis, the bacterium that causes anthrax, nothing beats the inside of a warm human or animal host for triggering an intense spurt of rapid growth and reproductive activity. But when a warm-blooded animal isn't available, new U-M research shows that ordinary dirt can do the job, as well.

Contact: Sally Pobojewski
pobo@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
K-State science education professor to give symposium
John Staver will deliver a paper titled "Should intelligent design be included in school science?" today at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Seattle. His answer to that question is a resounding "no" until the theory can be established as an accepted scientific theory. According to Staver, the intelligent design theory is a religious-based idea that is an outgrowth of older forms of creationism.

Contact: John Staver
staver@k-state.edu
785-532-6294
Kansas State University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
K-State professor to give paper on potential impact of ag bioterrorism
The key to minimizing impact is early detection and accurate diagnosis. The earlier the detection and diagnosis, the earlier the response; the earlier the response the lower the impact. That's the basic philosophy whether dealing with a human disease like cancer or one in plants like karnal bunt of wheat. Or an occurrence of bioterrorism.
US Department of Homeland Security

Contact: James Stack
jstack@k-state.edu
785-532-1388
Kansas State University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
U.S. commission makes dramatic recommendations for ocean health
In June 2003, the Pew Oceans Commission released recommendations "to avert decline of ocean wildlife and collapse of ocean ecosystems." It calls for immediate reform of U.S. ocean laws and policies to restore ocean wildlife, protect ocean ecosystems, and preserve the ecological, economic and social benefits the oceans provide in essence, a 'Clean Oceans Act.'

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Planning effective bioterror responses
New modeling studies show how bioterror agents may spread throughout the population in the case of an attack and how such attacks can be detected. Scientists reported these findings, which should help policymakers design effective public health measures, today at the 2004 AAAS (Triple-A-S) Annual Meeting. If a bioterror attack should occur, early detection would be crucial for saving lives. But how could local public health officials know whether one patient's symptoms were part of a larger trend?

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Risk and food are on the same plate: World food safety experts offer new methods to assess risk
New methods are in the pipeline to improve the safety of the world's food supply, and the need is imminent, said the director of the National Food Safety and Toxicology Center at Michigan State University.

Contact: Tom Oswald
oswald@msu.edu
517-355-2281
Michigan State University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Titan is ideal lab for oceanography, meteorology
Saturn's moon Titan will give scientists their first look at oceans beyond Earth when the Cassini mission reaches Saturn later this year.

Contact: Ralph Lorenz
rlorenz@lpl.arizona.edu
520-621-5585
University of Arizona

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Lake restrictions make lakeshore property more valuable
People are willing to pay more to live on a lake that's protected from degradation, often related to lakeshore development.

Contact: Bill Provencher
provencher@aae.wisc.edu
608-262-9494
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Symposium examines the growing influence of aerosols on climate
In a few decades, it's likely that scientists will look back at the early part of the 21st century and regard it as a fundamental stage in understanding the importance of the effects of aerosols on Earth's climate. In fact, it was in this time period, they may say, that aerosols were first found to be as climatologically significant as greenhouse gases.

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Surveillance and containment would be effective intervention against deliberate smallpox attack
In the event of a large, intentional release of smallpox, the current government policy of post-release surveillance and containment, if quickly implemented, would be sufficient to prevent a widespread epidemic, according to a study by biostatisticians at Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health.

Contact: Tia Webster
twebste@emory.edu
404-727-5692
Emory University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Seeing the forest for the trees: The future of environmental policy lies in interaction
The future of environmental policy lies in embracing ambiguity in the understanding that the days of dreaming of isolated fixes to problems are over. The future, a Michigan State University ecologist told those at the American Associate for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting here, is all about understanding that there are no simple solutions, or at least none that isolated.

Contact: Tom Oswald
oswald@msu.edu
517-355-2281
Michigan State University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
University of Minnesota professors to speak at symposium on international trade
Professors will discuss international trade, including the effects of American trade policies and the safety of genetically modified organisms at "Preaching Free Trade, Practicing Protectionism," a symposium Feb. 14 at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting In Seattle.

Contact: Deane Morrison
morri029@umn.edu
612-624-2346
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
U. of Colorado professor pioneering tissue engineering from knees to hearts to brains
University of Colorado at Boulder Professor Kristi Anseth, an investigator with the prestigious Howard Hughes Medical Institute, has high hopes for the future of tissue engineering as a way to make people healthier, happier and to live longer.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Kristi Anseth
Kristi.Anseth@colorado.edu
303-492-3147
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Religion guides views of fertility treatment in Middle East
Among Muslims, reproductive technologies can clash with deeply held religious beliefs about the importance of biologically based kinship, family life and parenthood.

Contact: Colleen Newvine
cnewvine@umich.edu
734-647-4411
University of Michigan

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Intelligent design: The new 'big tent' for evolution's critics
For Ron Numbers, the leading historian of the struggle between Darwinism and the anti-evolution movements of the past 140 years, intelligent design is simply the latest effort to create a "big tent for all people critical of evolution."

Contact: Ronald Numbers
rnumbers@med.wisc.edu
608-262-3701
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Nobel laureate discusses muse for Lavoisier
In a symposium, "It's All About Oxygen," at the annual meeting of the AAAS, Cornell professor Roald Hoffmann, author of the one-act play, "Oxygen," discussed his muse, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze Lavoisier, the wife of chemist Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, who was incorrectly credited with the discovery of Oxygen.

Contact: Franklin Crawford
fac10@cornell.edu
607-255-9737
Cornell University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Small resource changes might reduce Kenya poverty
Alice Pell, professor of animal science at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., is the principal investigator on a five-year, multidisciplinary research effort to study how small changes in natural resources could have profound effects on people's lives.
National Science Foundation's Biocomplexity initiative

Contact: Blaine P. Friedlander Jr.
bpf2@cornell.edu
607-255-3290
Cornell University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Pacific Northwest National Lab unveils most complete human blood-plasma proteome map to date
Researchers have identified an astounding 4,000 distinctive proteins in human blood plasma, a critical step toward cataloguing biological markers for early diagnosis cancer and other diseases. "This is 10 times the number of proteins identified" and previously reported, said Richard D. Smith, a senior scientist and Battelle Fellow at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The proteomics advance was announced Saturday at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Bill Cannon
cannon@pnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Major U.S. environmental policy bears scrutiny in midlife
A major piece of U.S. environmental legislation is bracing for its 35th birthday.

Contact: Tom Oswald
oswald@msu.edu
517-355-2281
Michigan State University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
PNNL envisions smart energy approach projected to save billions
The United States will have to invest $450 billion in conventional electric infrastructure just to meet expected growth in demand in the next 20 years, say researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This doesn't address grid instabilities and inefficiencies, security vulnerabilities and costly mortgages on large assets sized to meet just a few hundred hours of peak usage. The answer, asserts PNNL, is a complete transformation of the electricity system through use of information technology.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Dawn J. White
dawn.white@pnl.gov
509-372-6618
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing releases 51-75 out of 123.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

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