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Showing releases 76-100 out of 123.

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Research News Releases

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
International science team tracks ocean predators around the globe
Following giant tunas as they move across the ocean has always been a challenge. A decade ago, the thought of tagging and tracking more than 1,000 bluefin tunas was only a dream. Now it's been done, and an even more ambitious goal of following thousands of open-ocean predators, representing two dozen marine species, across the North Pacific has been initiated.

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
831-915-0088
Stanford University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Nanoparticle probes are destined for major new role in medical diagnostics and drug delivery
The emerging miniaturized world known as nanomedicine integrates technology, biology and medicine using tools and materials constructed from molecular- and atomic-sized particles too small to seen with a conventional laboratory microscope. Shuming Nie, PhD, professor of biomedical engineering at Emory and Georgia Tech, will highlight exciting technological breakthroughs in nanomedicine at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Contact: Ron Sauder
rsauder@emory.edu
404-727-3366
Emory University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Institutional transformation: Environments can help or hinder women's success in academia
From scrutinizing evaluation policies to opening doors on insider knowledge, the Georgia Institute of Technology is making strides to address subtle inequities that can adversely affect women's advancement in academia.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Toon
john.toon@edi.gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology Research News

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Goal of ocean 'iron fertilization' said still unproved
After a decade of small-scale testing, researchers are still uncertain whether seeding ocean waters with tanker loads of iron particles could alleviate global warming, said a Duke University scientist involved in the studies.

Contact: Monte Basgall
monte.basgall@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
New flu vaccine provides insight into immunity development
With this season's launch of FluMist, the first intranasal vaccine against influenza, U.S. health consumers could potentially have simple and painless protection from the sometimes deadly virus. Harry Greenberg, MD, professor of microbiology and immunology at Stanford University School of Medicine, will present an overview of the hurdles encountered in the development of a live vaccine and the lessons that might apply to development of other important vaccines at a Feb. 13 presentation called "Live Intranasal Influenza Vaccine: A New Era Begins."

Contact: Mitzi Baker
mitzibaker@stanford.edu
650-725-2106
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Gender barriers: New book looks at roadblocks impeding women scientists and engineers
Whether they are at large research institutions or small liberal arts colleges, balancing work and family remains the top challenge for women scientists and engineers in academia, reports a Georgia Institute of Technology researcher. In her new book, "The Science Glass Ceiling" (Routledge, March 2004), Sue Rosser identifies obstacles that prevent women engineers and scientists from advancing at educational institutions and cause them to be underrepresented among faculty.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Toon
john.toon@edi.gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology Research News

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Communicating with machines: What the next generation of speech recognizers will do
When the motion picture "2001, A Space Odyssey" opened in 1968, conversation between a stranded astronaut and a malevolent computer named HAL seemed plausible for the year 2001 - then more than three decades in the future. But as any user of today's automatic speech recognition technology can attest, that future hasn't quite arrived yet.

Contact: John Toon
john.toon@edi.gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology Research News

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Babies tune into others' intentions early in the first year
Research at the University of Chicago shows that the basic human capacity of interpreting a person's behavior in terms of the person's goals or intentions begins to emerge early in the first year of life.
John Merck Fund, Robert McCormick Tribune Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: William Harms
w-harms@uchicago.edu
773-702-8356
University of Chicago

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Powerful machines are coming in small packages
A new class of micro-gadgets - some no larger than a pencil eraser - are poised to make military and other equipment easier to power and carry. Scientists presented the latest developments from their micro-engineering labs today at the 2004 AAAS (Triple-A-S) Annual Meeting. AAAS is the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Unlocking the genetics and evolution of the dog could prove beneficial for humans
For thousands of years, humans have domesticated and established relationships with dogs. Today at the 2004 AAAS (Triple-A-S) Annual Meeting, a panel of dog enthusiasts (who also happen to be scientists) celebrate the canine species with new research mapping current purebred breeds back to a single progenitor breed, as well as recent findings in genetic 'trade-off' mechanisms that take place in dog genomes.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Study uncovers how stress and hormones lead to smoking relapse
Researchers at the University of Minnesota will present new findings on stress and quitting smoking at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Seattle February 13. They have found that intensity of withdrawal symptoms and changes in certain hormone levels after quitting smoking predict potential for a smoker's relapse. They also found that men and women are affected by these factors differently.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Brenda Hudson
bhudson@umn.edu
612-624-5680
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Link between sleep, cancer progression explored by Stanford researcher
A good night's sleep may be one weapon in the fight against cancer, according to researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine. Their work is among the first of its kind to piece together the link between mental well-being and cancer recovery. Spiegel will present this work at the annual American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting at a Feb. 13 session titled "Biology and Behavior: New Pathways to Cancer Control?"

Contact: Amy Adams
amyadams@stanford.edu
650-723-3900
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Cyberinfrastructure poised to revolutionize environmental sciences and other disciplines
The convergence of information and communication technologies into a national "cyberinfrastructure" is poised to revolutionize the environmental sciences and many other disciplines in the coming years, according to researchers presenting at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Seattle. The two Feb. 13 sessions on cyberinfrastructure were organized by the heads of two National Science Foundation (NSF) directorates.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Hart
dhart@nsf.gov
703-292-7737
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Small amounts of alcohol or anesthetics may damage the developing brain
Brief exposure to small amounts of alcohol or anesthetic drugs can trigger nerve cell death in the developing brain, according to research reported at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Report details growing climate change threat to coral reefs
Global climate change poses a major threat to the world's coral reefs, which already are suffering from coastal development, overfishing, and pollution. A new report, co-authored by National Center for Atmospheric Research scientist Joan Kleypas, warns that changes in surface ocean temperature and chemistry will continue to damage these biologically vital and economically important ecosystems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anatta
anatta@ucar.edu
303-497-8604
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Malnutrition and misery will be 'unimaginable' by 2054
Nearly half the world's population of 6.3 billion people are malnourished -- more than at any time in human history -- but malnutrition, disease and human misery will worsen in the next 50 years, Cornell ecologist David Pimentel tells fellow scientists.

Contact: Roger Segelken
hrs2@cornell.edu
607-255-9736
Cornell University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Role of gas hydrates in carbon cycling and environmental change noted
Between 2 trillion and 20 trillion tons of methane in gas hydrates lie on the outer edges of the continents, just beneath the ocean floor. This enormous pool of methane might contain more carbon than all the world's oil, coal and natural gas reserves combined. The carbon that goes there leaves these hydrate reservoirs via several processes, each of which is poorly quantified.

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Wearable air-conditioners: Hot, new microtechnology keeps GI's cool
Personal protective suits may protect soldiers from chemical and biological weapons, yet extreme heat inside that gear poses a different but equal threat. Without portable cooling technology to ward off heat exhaustion and heat stroke, suits meant to save lives can incapacitate soldiers in just minutes.
US Army Communications-Electronics Command

Contact: Geoff Harvey
geoffrey.harvey@pnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Applying results of women's health initiative study to individual patients
Scientists at the AAAS (Triple-A-S) Annual Meeting argued that women facing severe menopause symptoms should demand that their doctors take the time to help them balance the risks versus the benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). AAAS is the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Studies suggest brain injury results from developmental exposure to alcohol, anesthesia, and lead
Neuroapoptosis--the death of brain cells--may help explain a wide range of developmental disturbances, including fetal alcohol syndrome and schizophrenia, according to researchers who presented a symposium today at the 2004 AAAS (Triple-A-S) Annual Meeting. AAAS is the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Monica Amarelo
mamarelo@aaas.org
206-774-6330
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Distant quasars probe end of cosmic dark ages
The most ancient known quasars formed about 700 million years after the big bang. Astronomers are using them to probe the very early universe.

Contact: Xiaohui Fan
fan@as.arizona.edu
520-626-7558
University of Arizona

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Breakthroughs in acoustic tracking shine new light on the lives of fish
Scientists speaking at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting on February 13th at 9AM, revealed how new acoustic tags and underwater listening devices are allowing scientists to continuously peer into the daily lives of fish, providing the detailed knowledge needed to design effective conservation measures. New data on fish movement and habitat use are allowing managers, fishermen, environmentalists and others to evaluate trade-offs of different reserve sizes and locations.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Dirty air from Asia can push U.S. air pollution to unhealthy levels
Increasing evidence shows air pollution from Asia can cross the Pacific Ocean to the West Coast of North America in a matter of days. Though rare, a University of Washington, Bothell, research has found that such an event can have dramatic effects on air quality this side of the Pacific.

Contact: Vince Stricherz
vinces@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Local, regional governments could take lead in curbing global air pollution
As global population surges, pollution from one nation more frequently invades the air of another nation, sometimes one thousands of miles away. An international relations specialist at the University of Washington, Bothell, suggests that effective answers might require efforts on the regional and local levels, as well as national.

Contact: Vince Stricherz
vinces@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 13-Feb-2004
2004 AAAS Annual Meeting
Carnegie Mellon scientist says new technologies boost bio-terrorism surveillance
Society can share medical information for bio-terrorism surveillance purposes while preserving the privacy of individual medical records through technologies created by Carnegie Mellon University computer scientist Latanya Sweeney, who will speak at 11 a.m. Friday, February 13, at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Contact: Teresa Thomas
thomas@cmu.edu
412-268-2900
Carnegie Mellon University

Showing releases 76-100 out of 123.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

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