EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
28-Jul-2014 00:25
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Register Now

Programs and Events

General Information

Sponsors and Exhibitors

Newsroom

Restricted Login Area

Contact Meetings Group

Newsroom HQ:
Taft Room, Marriott Wardman Park

Thursday,
February 17

8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
February 18 - 20

7:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

Monday,
February 21

7:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m.

Tel: 202-745-2112

Accessibility Option On

Links

Newsroom Main

Newsroom Information

Newsroom Registration

Program

Hotel Information

Credentialing

Newsroom Special Events

Science Journalism Awards

AAAS Fellowships for African Reporters

Contact Press Staff

EurekAlert!

AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 111.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 15-Mar-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Biologist's findings on fertility and status in monkeys generate scientific, media interest
University of California, Riverside Assistant Adjunct Professor of Biology Wendy Saltzman's inquiries into the role social position plays in the fertility of female marmosets were the recent subject of a presentation at the American Association for the Advancement of Science and on the BBC 4 radio show "Leading Edge."

Contact: Ricardo Duran
ricardo.duran@ucr.edu
951-827-5893
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 21-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Failing to aid Africa will lead to more terrorism
If the developed world fails to invest more in African agriculture and rural infrastructure to benefit the poor, the world will become a much more dangerous place, Cornell University economist Per Pinstrup-Andersen will report at the 2005 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Susan Lang
SSL4@cornell.edu
607-255-3613
Cornell University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
New collaborations offer hope for HIV/AIDS vaccine
Prospects for a safe, effective AIDS vaccine are improving as researchers from the public and private sectors begin to collaborate in new and creative ways, researchers said today at the 2005 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 21-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
More than half of high school seniors employed, mostly in near minimum-wage jobs
The common perception that most American teenagers go to school, engage in extracurricular activities such as sports and hang out with their friends is missing one and time-consuming element -- work. More than half of high school seniors, 56 percent, surveyed said they were working in the spring of their final year of school.
Andrew Mellon Foundation, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Joel Schwarz
joels@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 21-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
New methods of solving 'hard' computer problems
Researchers at Cornell University have developed tools to solve many so-called intractable computer problems, at least in certain practical situations, by using methods that avoid searching the lengthy paths that occur in "heavy tails" of a path distribution.
National Science Foundation, Others

Contact: Bill Steele
ws21@cornell.edu
607-255-7164
Cornell University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Computer model being developed at Stanford may help surgeons better predict patient outcomes
On Feb. 21 at the annual meeting for the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C., Taylor will present his latest accomplishment: factoring in the flexibility of veins and arteries to his model of the cardiovascular system. The realistic response of blood vessels adds more predictive ability to earlier versions of his simulation, which assumed rigid vessel walls for simplicity.

Contact: Mitzi Baker
mitzibaker@stanford.edu
650-725-2106
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Bird IQ test takes flight
How smart is your parakeet or that crow in the back yard? Ask Dr. Louis Lefebvre, inventor of the world's only comprehensive avian IQ index. His intelligence index is not only separating the featherweights from the big bird brains, it's also providing clues about why some birds make great immigrants, as well as insight into the parallel evolution of primate and bird brains.
Science and Engineering Research Canada

Contact: Dr. Louis Lefebvre
Louis.lefebvre@mcgill.ca
514-398-6457
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 21-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Mayo Clinic researcher calls for improved newborn screening
A Mayo Clinic physician and researcher today reported that a combination of the latest technology and double-tiered analysis could improve genetic screening for newborns as much as forty-fold, while testing for dozens more diseases than is now performed in some states.

Contact: Bob Nellis
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 21-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Ecological destruction fuels emerging diseases
The destruction of habitat by human activity and the extinction of species around the world is more than a looming environmental catastrophe, warns a Canadian zoologist. This ecological damage also endangers human health by turning parasites into "evolutionary land mines."
Science and Engineering Research Canada

Contact: Dr. Daniel Brooks
dbrooks@zoo.utoronto.ca
416-978-3139
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
New approaches teach undergraduate students to think like researchers
A UC Santa Cruz professor has developed a teaching exercise for undergraduate biology classes to give students a sense of how scientists proceed when valid data appear to conflict. It is just one example of the novel approaches to teaching science that are emerging from an experimental undergraduate research laboratory established at UCSC in 2002.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
El Nino forecasting could aid fisheries management, disease control, marine species protection
Although predicting el Nino events months before they begin has become a major success story in climate prediction, a Duke University oceanographer who did early research in the field believes more could be done with the computer and satellite technology underlying these advances.

Contact: Monte Basgall
monte.basgall@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Climate change to bring a wave of new health risks
According to Jonathan A. Patz, as the world's climate warms, and as people make widespread alterations to the global landscape, human populations will become far more vulnerable to heat-related mortality, air pollution-related illnesses, infectious diseases and malnutrition.

Contact: Jonathan Patz
patz@wisc.edu
608-262-4775
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Study: Young adults can be motivated to eat fruits, veggies
Young adults can be motivated to eat more servings of fruits and vegetables if they are exposed to tailored, practical messages about nutrition, a University of Wisconsin-Madison nutritional scientist announced today (Feb. 20) at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Contact: Susan Nitzke
nitzke@nutrisci.wisc.edu
608-262-1692
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Ultra-cold temperature physics opens way to understanding and applications
Researchers doing ultra-cold temperature physics may not have to wear parkas, but they are producing the coldest temperatures ever and exploring model quantum systems that might lead to more accurate clocks and gyroscopes, quantum computers and communications as well as a better understanding of quantum physics phenomena.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Georgia Tech research indicates immune complications associated with combination medical devices
Research from Georgia Tech/ Emory University reveals that new combination medical devices may have potential immune complications, but findings could help with design solutions.

Contact: Megan McRainey
megan.mcrainey@icpa.gatech.edu
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Global warming led to atmospheric hydrogen sulfide and Permian extinction
Volcanic eruptions in Siberia 251 million years ago may have started a cascade of events leading to high hydrogen sulfide levels in the oceans and atmosphere and precipitating the largest mass extinction in Earth's history, according to a Penn State geoscientist.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Animal parenting, personality and pair-ups
Parenting. Establishing life partnerships. Getting to know someone else's personality. These experiences feel profoundly human, but they have more in common with the animal world than one might think, researchers said today at the 2005 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
We're here, we're warming, can we get used to it?
Climate change-related losses to agriculture in Washington's Yakima Valley will be between $92 million and $163 million a year, according to a study by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Wash., presented Sunday at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting. The study is one of the most detailed to date on global warming and its likely effect on human activity.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Bill Cannon
cannon@pnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
New Georgia Tech micro-CT imaging technique to help tissue engineers improve bone regeneration
A new technique developed at Georgia Tech can help reveal better ways to heal and regenerate bones using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) imaging. The technique provides detailed 3-D images of both vascularization and mineralization in bone, giving researchers an unprecedented depth of data on how a bone implant is integrating into the body.

Contact: Megan McRainey
megan.mcrainey@icpa.gatech.edu
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
The thrill of discovery: Pitt professor reveals how he gets students interested in science
Today at the 2005 American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., University of Pittsburgh professor Graham Hatfull will illustrate how he piques students' curiosity about science. High school students often perceive the scientific community as inaccessible. To address this issue, Hatfull and colleagues are exploring ways to make research experiences available to students at all stages in their education. "You're never too young to make a genuine scientific contribution," said Hatfull.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Karen Hoffman
klh52@pitt.edu
412-624-4356
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
How often should women get mammograms?
Researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston have devised a mathematical tool that predicts how the frequency of mammograms affects the number of lives saved by detecting breast cancers at an earlier stage. With screening guidelines and financial coverage varying among health systems and insurers sometimes dramatically the model provides quantitative predictions of the mortality benefits, on average, in populations of women over the course of 40 years.

Contact: Richard Saltus
617-347-3394
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Learning to fight an adversary that won't stay down
New biomolecular technologies have largely failed to deliver the hoped-for knockout punch breakthrough against the defences of disease-causing bacteria, says a leading Canadian specialist in antibiotic resistance.
Science and Engineering Research Canada

Contact: Dr. Julian Davies
julian.davies@ubc.ca
604-822-5856
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
U-M scientist to talk about tissue engineering at AAAS
Scientists have a pretty good handle on how to teach human cells to do tricks in a laboratory -- things like getting soft cells from the mouth's lining to form bone.

Contact: Colleen Newvine
cnewvine@umich.edu
734-647-4411
University of Michigan

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Scientists discuss future of science in the Bush administration
"The future of science is precarious under President George Bush's administration in light of looming funding cuts," said Rosina Bierbaum, Dean of the University of Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment.

Contact: Laura Bailey
baileylm@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 20-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Multimedia teaching tools for neuroscience
Neuroscience for high schoolers? Why not, says Cornell University neurobiologist Ron Hoy. He describes a suite of novel, interdisciplinary multimedia teaching tools for high school and college classes at the 2005 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Susan S. Lang
SSL4@cornell.edu
607-255-3613
Cornell University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 111.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>