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EurekAlert!

AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 111.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Research News Releases

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
'Systems engineering' offers a new approach for fighting terrorism in public spaces
In protecting public spaces such as buildings and aircraft from potential chemical or biological terror attacks, an ounce of prevention may be worth a pound of sensing.

Contact: John Toon
john.toon@edi.gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology Research News

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Astronomers measure mass of smallest black hole in a galactic nucleus
A group led by astronomers from Ohio State University and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have measured the mass of a unique black hole, and determined that it is the smallest found so far. Early results indicate that the black hole weighs in at less than a million times the mass of our sun -- which would make it as much as 100 times smaller than others of its type.

Contact: Brad Peterson
Peterson.12@osu.edu
614-292-7886
Ohio State University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Science
Scientists find both damage and promise for renewal in devastated Iraqi marshlands
In the first analysis of the ecology of the storied Iraqi Mesopotamian marshes after the toppling of the regime of Saddam Hussein, scientists have found many problems, but also the promise of partial revitalization, should those problems be solved.
US Agency for International Development

Contact: Monte Basgall
monte.basgall@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Feeding the world requires more than a spoonful of safety
While the United States battles an obesity epidemic, millions around the world are starving or malnourished - a population already at increased risk of foodborne disease. Fighting hunger goes hand in hand with the fight against foodborne disease, urges a Michigan State University researcher.

Contact: Kirsten Khire
khirek@cvm.msu.edu
517-432-3100 x111
Michigan State University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Scientists will discuss remarkable advances in whale research at the annual meeting of AAAS
Stanford marine biologist Steve Palumbi is no stranger to controversy, having once incurred the wrath of the Japanese whaling industry by conducting the first genetic study of whale meat sold in Tokyo. At the AAAS meeting on Feb. 20, Palumbi and his colleagues will explain how advances in genetics and other technologies have helped revolutionize whale research while sometimes sparking controversy.

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
New findings lead researchers to question basic assumptions of fisheries management
Biologists speaking at a symposium in Washington, D.C., this week warn that fundamental assumptions underlying current fisheries management practices may be wrong, resulting in management decisions that threaten the future supply of fish and the long-term survival of some fish populations.

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
New cyber security protocol for online banking, and more
A new security approach could improve safeguarding of credit card numbers, bank passwords and other sensitive information for those who surf the Internet using wireless connections, researchers told the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) today.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
K-State professor to discuss feeding the world's population without poison
Agriculture is often seen as being in conflict with natural resources as farmers attempt to feed the world without poisoning the Earth, said Charles Rice, a Kansas State University soil microbiologist and professor of agronomy. Excessive tillage, low productivity, soil erosion and residue removal result in loss of soil structure, organic matter, nutrients and biodiversity.

Contact: Charles Rice
cwrice@k-state.edu
785-532-7217
Kansas State University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Largest machines on Earth will be described at AAAS
Maury Tigner, director of Cornell's Laboratory for Elementary Particle Physics (LEPP), is playing a major role in CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). He described the machines at the AAAS meeting in Washington, D.C., Feb. 19, 2005.

Contact: David Brand
deb27@cornell.edu
607-255-3651
Cornell University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Muon opportunists: Detecting the unseen with natural probes
Earth is showered constantly by particles called muons that are created by cosmic rays, and clever scientists are finding ways to use them as probes of dense objects, including a massive pyramid in Mexico and volcanoes in Japan. American researchers also have proposed using the energetic particles to detect smuggled nuclear materials in vehicles and cargo containers.

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Thwarting 'stealth attacks' a wireless security must
The profusion of wireless communications in homes, in coffee shops and even on battlefields presents us with fantastic new conveniences -- but also new security problems. Indiana University computer scientist Markus Jakobsson will discuss "stealth" attacks over wireless networks, which can disrupt communications and endanger personal information.
RSA Security Inc.

Contact: David Bricker
brickerd@indiana.edu
812-219-8308
Indiana University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Warming world could worsen pollution in Northeast, Midwest
While science's conventional wisdom holds that pollution feeds global warming, a new research suggests that the reverse could also occur: A warming globe could stifle summer's cleansing winds over the Northeast and Midwest over the next 50 years, significantly worsening air pollution in these regions.
US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Steve Bradt
steve_bradt@harvard.edu
617-275-3628
Harvard University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
The secret lives of whales
Using genetics, Navy sonar, deep-sea submersibles, and toxicology, scientists are peering into the lives of whales - past and present - in ways never before possible. At a 3:00 PM press conference on February 19th at the annual meeting of AAAS, leading researchers will share their latest discoveries emerging from these high tech ventures, using DNA sequences, deep-sea video and sound-clips.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Restoring the marshes of Eden
In one of the rare good news stories coming out of Iraq, the country's almost-decimated wetlands have begun rebounding under the efforts of local residents and the new government in Iraq, monitored by an international team of scientists.
Science and Engineering Research Canada

Contact: Dr. Barry Warner
bwarner@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4567
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Seismic rocker aims to cut the noise
A Canadian seismologist is arguing that our understanding of the structure of the Earth's interior is based on the equivalent of fuzzy ultrasound images that leave room for improvement.
Science and Engineering Research Canada

Contact: Dr. Felix Herrmann
fherrmann@eos.ubc.ca
604-822-8628
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
New science sheds light on rebuilding fisheries
In a scientific double whammy, researchers report that fishing pressure is causing fish to evolve to smaller sizes, just as new studies show that larger fish are critical to sustaining populations. In species such as Pacific rockfish, the big, old females not only produce exponentially more eggs than younger, smaller females, but their hearty larvae have a far greater chance of survival.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
American Economic Review
Comparing traditional scientific journals and newer Open Access journals
Georgia Institute of Technology researcher will talk about the economic viability of new approach to academic publishing -- Open Access -- at the 2005 AAAS Annual Meeting.

Contact: Elizabeth Campell
elizabeth.campell@icpa.gatech.edu
404-894-4233
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Hard choices: Pitt researcher presents findings on when to accept organ transplants
A transplant is the only option for someone with end-stage liver disease, but the patient faces difficult questions when choosing the best time to receive the transplant. Today, in a panel discussion at the 2005 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., University of Pittsburgh researcher Andrew Schaefer will present findings on how his mathematical models can help a patient make the right decision.
National Science Foundation, Healthcare Research and Quality

Contact: Karen Hoffman
klh52@pitt.edu
412-624-4356
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Technological revolutions in sensors, robotics, and telecommunications allow new views of ocean
Scientists can now visualize the ocean floor in remote areas of the Arctic, observe rockfish hideouts, and see live images of coral cities thousands of meters under the sea's surface. Soon their robots will be able to "live" on the bottom of the ocean. In an AAAS press conference on Feb. 19th, scientists will discuss innovations in underwater research and how they are advancing both science and management.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Science partnerships crucial to US - Arab relations
Research partnerships in science and technology are a crucial part of American efforts to build alliances with Arab nations, and should receive increased financial support from the United States and oil-rich Arab governments.

Contact: David Terraso
david.terraso@icpa.gatech.edu
404-385-2966
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Increasing nitrogen pollution in nation's coastal waters
Much of the nitrogen spewing from vehicle exhausts appears to be contaminating coastal systems such as Chesapeake Bay to a much greater extent than previously thought, according to a study by researchers at Cornell University, reported at the 2005 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Susan S. Lang
SSL4@cornell.edu
607-255-3613
Cornell University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Secrets of whales' long-distance songs are being unveiled
Christopher Clark, director of Cornell University's Bioacoustics Research Program, listens to whales in the Atlantic using the U.S. Navy's SOSUS. From acoustical maps, Clark realizes whales have a different time scale. He discussed this at the 2005 annual AAAS meeting in Washington, D.C.

Contact: David Brand
deb27@cornell.edu
607-255-3651
Cornell University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Sociologist proposes new system of racial identification
Cornell University sociologist David Harris has found problems in the census reporting of racial identity that distort demographic research. Instead he proposes a "matrix of race" approach. He discussed the problem at the 2005 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Franklin Crawford
fac10@cornell.edu
607-255-9737
Cornell University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Coastal dead zones may lead to ecosystem-based fisheries management
A new approach to managing ocean fisheries by controlling nutrient runoff far upstream in watersheds has received new support from emerging evidence that resulting coastal low-oxygen dead zones may reduce fish and shellfish harvests, said a Duke University marine scientist.

Contact: Monte Basgall
monte.basgall@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Nano Letters
Successful test of single molecule switch opens the door to biomolecular electronics
A team of scientists from the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University have created the first reproducible single molecule negative differential resistor and in the process have developed a groundbreaking experimental technique that provides a "roadmap" for designing single molecule devices based on biochemistry.

Contact: James Hathaway
hathaway@asu.edu
480-965-6375
Arizona State University

Showing releases 26-50 out of 111.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>