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EurekAlert!

AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 111.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Scientists urge outcome-based, watershedwide approach to restore the Chesapeake
AAAS/Sea Grant Panel will take place on Feb 20, 2005 entitled "Transcending Boundaries: Challenges for Holistic Restoration in the Chesapeake Watershed." A panel of scientifiic experts addresses the issue of why the two-decade old Chesapeake Bay restoration effort has not yet met expectations and details the adaptive management approach required to achieve concrete results on the ground.

Contact: Jack Greer or Erica Goldman
goldman@mdsg.umd.edu
301-403-4220
Maryland Sea Grant

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Penn astrophysicist outlines a multi-pronged approach in the hunt for dark energy
In the last few years, the universe has gotten weirder. The expansion of the universe is accelerating and one theory proposed to account for this acceleration is what has been termed "dark energy." At the AAAS Annual Meeting, University of Pennsylvania astrophysicist Licia Verde outlines how the hunt for dark energy will draw on the avalanche of recent and forthcoming data on surveys of objects throughout the universe.

Contact: Greg Lester
glester@pobox.upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Scientists mount ambitious experiments, propose dramatic new theories about dark energy
A panel of physicists and astronomers will preview emerging theories and experiments aimed at solving the mystery of dark energy, an invisible force that dominates the universe, from 1:45 to 4:45 p.m. Friday, Feb. 18, at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C. The discussion will take place in the Omni Shoreham Hotel Diplomat Room on the lobby level.

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Revolutionary grassroots astrophysics project 'Einstein@Home' goes live
A new distributed computing project now offers people around the globe the chance to aid in the search for gravitational waves from space.
National Science Foundation

Contact: James Riordon
riordon@aps.org
301-209-3238
American Physical Society

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Plants become green Mr. Clean to combat toxic messes
The next big way to clean up toxic sites may be coaxing plants to become janitors, a Michigan State University scientist says. Clayton Rugh explains that in the early stages of phytoremediation, plants were used like sponges, soaking up toxic substances so they can be safely discarded. The next step, Rugh says, is plants that act like a green Mr. Clean, with roots that make detergents to break down toxins.

Contact: Clayton Rugh
rugh@msu.edu
517-355-0271 x1244
Michigan State University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
University research ethics committees: A look from behind closed doors
Georgia Tech researcher studies research ethics committees' decision making.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Elizabeth Campell
elizabeth.campell@icpa.gatech.edu
404-894-4233
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Language development via the internet
Professor Crystal tells the Annual Conference of the AAAS that the advent of the internet and related communication technologies provide the greatest opportunity for the development of the English language since the advent of the printing press in the Middle Ages. The variety of applications of new technology leads to new stylistic forms and increases the expressive range of a language, especially at the informal end of the spectrum.

Contact: Elinor Elis-Williams
press@bangor.ac.uk
44-124-838-3298
Bangor University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Looking through the Hubble Space Telescope with an artist's eye
Although derived from scientific data, the spectacular images from the Hubble Space Telescope circulate far beyond the scientific community. From postage stamps to the cover of Pearl Jam CDs, images of the heavens collected by the Hubble Space Telescope have become part of American culture, appreciated not only for their scientific content, but also for their raw emotional power.

Contact: Jennifer Carnig
jecarnig@uchicago.edu
773-702-6421
University of Chicago

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Melting ice important indicator of global warming
Surrounded by winter snow and ice, melting seems like a good thing, but, on a global scale, the melting of ice sheets and glaciers is a sign of global warming, according to a Penn State glaciologist.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Epilepsy and depression - A two-way street?
Researchers have noted a higher incidence of depression among patients with epilepsy than the general population or others with chronic conditions such as diabetes. For a long time, depression was thought to be a complication of epilepsy.

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Missing micronutrients - How best to nourish a child?
As many as half of children in the developing world lack enough vital micronutrients, such as iron and zinc, in their diets. While dietary supplements in the form of pills can provide a quick fix, recent research suggests that adding small portions of meat daily can improve both the children's health and performance on cognitive tests.

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Lead in the environment causes violent crime, reports University of Pittsburgh researcher at AAAS
Exposure to lead may be one of the most significant causes of violent crime in young people, according to one of the nation's leading researchers on the subject. Research shows between 18 and 38 percent of all delinquency in Pennsylvania's Allegheny County, which includes Pittsburgh, could be due to lead.

Contact: Craig Dunhoff
DunhoffCC@upmc.edu
412-647-3555
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
US Constitution provides framework for debate on genetic engineering of human beings
The US Constitution may not provide direct answers to policy questions about the genetic engineering of human beings, but it does offer shared values that can help frame the debate about this developing technology, according to a Georgia Institute of Technology professor.

Contact: Jane M. Sanders
jane.sanders@edi.gatech.edu
404-894-2214
Georgia Institute of Technology Research News

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
String theorist explores dark energy and our unique 'pocket' of the universe
Dark energy is a mysterious force that causes matter to accelerate away from other matter. It fuels the expansion of our universe, but it's an oddly small force. But if it were bigger and caused matter to fly apart any faster, you would not be here to read these words. On Feb. 18, Stanford physics professor Susskind will speak about dark energy in Washington, D.C., at the 2005 AAAS meeting.
Stanford University

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
NYU's Dvali says change in laws of gravity, not 'dark energy,' source of cosmic acceleration
New York University physicist Georgi Dvali concludes that the cosmic acceleration of the universe may be caused by the modification of standard laws of gravity at very large distances, and not by "dark energy," as posited by many in the field. This modification, Dvali argues, could be triggered by extra space dimensions to which gravity "leaks" over cosmic distances. Dvali's presentation took place at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Washington, D.C.

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Stanford researcher to discuss public confidence in genetic technology
How genetics can be safely translated into reliable and affordable medical applications will be discussed by Barbara Koenig, associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine, during a panel discussion Feb. 18 at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

Contact: Amy Adams
amyadams@stanford.edu
650-723-3900
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Marine seaweed can detoxify organic pollutants
Marine seaweeds have a remarkable and previously unknown capacity to detoxify serious organic pollutants such as TNT or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and they may therefore be able to play an important role in protecting the ecological health of marine life.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Greg Rorrer
gregory.rorrer@orst.edu
541-737-3370
Oregon State University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Brain-scanning technologies need standards, according to Stanford researcher
Judy Illes, PhD, senior research scholar at the Center for Biomedical Ethics at the Stanford University School of Medicine, will discuss the clinical implications of new imaging technologies today during the "Neuroethics: Neuroscience and its ethical, legal and social implications" panel discussion at the annual meeting for the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C.

Contact: Amy Adams
amyadams@stanford.edu
650-723-3900
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
USC dental researchers develop first test for predicting cavities in children
A saliva test can predict whether children will develop cavities later in life, USC researchers say.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Carl Marziali
marziali@usc.edu
213-740-4751
University of Southern California

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Titan's atmosphere may have come from ammonia, Huygens data say
Cassini-Huygens supplied new evidence about why Titan has an atmosphere, making it unique among all solar system moons, a University of Arizona planetary scientist says.

Contact: Lori Stiles
lstiles@u.arizona.edu
520-621-1877
University of Arizona

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Foiling fugitive fish
A leading Canadian fish farming scientist is stirring the scientific waters by arguing that it may be safer to risk introducing exotic salmon into a marine ecosystem than to farm native ones there.
Science and Engineering Research Canada

Contact: Dr. Ian Flemming
ifleming@mun.ca
709-737-2767
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Were bigger brains really smarter?
Bigger is smarter is better. That's the conventional wisdom for why the human brain gradually became three times larger than the ancestral brain. But bigger brains were not generally smarter brains. Archaeological records indicate our ancestors went through two periods of more than a million years each in which tool-making techniques didn't gradually improve, despite a gradual brain size increase.

Contact: Justin Reedy
jreedy@u.washington.edu
University of Washington

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Scientists advance in detection and attribution of climate change
Access to the next generation of climate change experiments has helped scientists obtain more comprehensive estimates of the expected "signal" of human influences on climate.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Linguistic research moving in new direction
Some linguistics researchers are applying larger scientific principles that describe natural forces to the study of language. This represents a major shift in linguistics research done over the last several decades.

Contact: Andrew Wedel
wedel@u.arizona.edu
520-621-6897
University of Arizona

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Natural selection as we speak
Shared properties of human languages are not the result of universal grammar but reflect self-organizing properties of language as an evolving system.

Contact: Dr. Juliette Blevins
blevins@eva.mpg.de
49-341-355-0325
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Showing releases 51-75 out of 111.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>