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EurekAlert!

AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 111.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
New study highlights universality of public views toward science and technology
In a new analysis comparing the public's perception of science across 40 nations, researchers have found extensive areas of similarity in how people think of science, particularly regarding the broader issues such as whether science and technology improve the quality of life.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Defining male and female
Gender, often said to depend solely upon anatomy or hormones, may depend also on hard-wired genetics, according to new research that could help doctors and lawyers better understand the one in 4,000 babies born with both male and female traits.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Gorilla diet tips -- Have we 'evolved to eat mush'?
Early humans living alongside great apes million years ago may have gained a competitive evolutionary advantage by embracing a primitive version of the Atkins Diet, according to new research discussed today at the 2005 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Climate threshold may alter economic picture of climate change
Typical economic analysis applied to global warming may be biased because they neglect climate thresholds, according to Penn State researchers.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Scripps researchers find clear evidence of human-produced warming in world's oceans
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, and their colleagues have produced the first clear evidence of human-produced warming in the world's oceans, a finding they say removes much of the uncertainty associated with debates about global warming. The authors make the case that their results clearly indicate that the warming is produced anthropogenically, or by human activities.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, US Department of Energy

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Cindy Clark
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Science
Teams build robots that walk like humans
Three independent research teams, including one from MIT, have built walking robots that mimic humans in terms of their gait, energy-efficiency, and control. The MIT robot also demonstrates a new learning system that allows the robot to continually adapt to the terrain as it walks.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Elizabeth Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Tissue Engineering
Stem-cell research hints at better looking cosmetic and reconstructive surgery
Stem-cell researchers have shown how cosmetic surgery, such as wrinkle removal and breast augmentation, might be improved with natural implants that keep their original size and shape better than synthetics.

Contact: Frank Blanchard
frank@whitaker.org
703-528-2430
Whitaker Foundation

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Spit, and call me in the morning
The eyes may be the window to the soul, but many scientists would say the mouth is the window to the body.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Science
Map of human genetic variation across populations may promise improved disease treatments
Mapping of key genetic signposts across three human populations could help speed efforts to pinpoint disease-related DNA variations, and ultimately may promise more effective, individualized treatments. The research, scheduled to appear 18 February in Science, "will provide an invaluable resource for genetic research to improve human health," said Donald Kennedy, the journal's editor-in-chief.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6421
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Science
Bipedal bots to star at AAAS media briefing
In a Feb. 17 media briefing at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), members of three independent research teams will jointly unveil a new breed of energy-efficient, two-legged, powered robots with a surprisingly human gait. The studies will be published in the journal Science on Feb. 18, 2005.

Contact: Joshua A. Chamot
jchamot@nsf.gov
703-292-8070
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Developmental Dynamics
Mechanical tension helps shape lung development
Embryonic organ development requires precise coordination and timing of cell growth in three-dimensional space. Researchers at Children's Hospital Boston have demonstrated that the process of budding and branching in the developing lung is driven by mechanical forces generated within individual cells. They have also identified a possible biochemical target for intervention. These insights could lead to new treatments for diseases and anomalies of the lungs, which are common in premature newborns.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Susan Craig
susan.craig@childrens.harvard.edu
617-355-6420
Boston Children's Hospital

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
USGS featured at AAAS - Nation's largest science meeting
How close are we to predicting earthquakes? Can science help diplomacy and national security? Could an ancient catastrophe offer a solution to a very modern problem? Learn the answer to these questions and more as USGS scientists participate in the annual American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting, Feb. 17-21. "The Nexus: Where Science Meets Society" is this year's theme.
US Geological Survey

Contact: Diane Noserale
dnoseral@usgs.gov
703-648-4333
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Brain controls robot arm in monkey, University of Pittsburgh researcher reports at AAAS
Scientists have made significant strides to create a permanent artificial device that can restore deliberate mobility to patients with paralyzing injuries. The concept is that, through thought alone, a person could direct a robotic arm a neural prosthesis to reach and manipulate a desired object.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Craig Dunhoff
DunhoffCC@upmc.edu
412-647-3555
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Small is different
The practice of pairing computer simulations with real-world experiments is becoming more vital as scientists delve deeper into realms where the actors are measured on the nanoscale.

Contact: David Terraso
david.terraso@icpa.gatech.edu
404-385-2966
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Science
Robots walk with close-to-human efficiency
Researchers at Cornell University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Holland's Delft University of Technology have built robots that seem to closely mimic the human gait, and the Cornell robot matches human efficiency. The inspiration: simple walking toys.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Bill Steele
ws21@cornell.edu
607-255-7164
Cornell University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Miniaturized lab permits saliva screening on the go
A team of scientists and engineers led by Daniel Malamud at the University of Pennsylvania has developed a robust means of analyzing oral samples. They are developing a portable lab, not much bigger than a credit card, which could detect exposure to a variety of substances, from narcotics to common bacteria and viruses. The AAAS Annual Meeting, Malamud will present a swab kit that detects HIV and Bacillus cereus, a bacterium closely related to anthrax.

Contact: Greg Lester
glester@pobox.upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 16-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
NASA news tips for AAAS annual meeting
NASA researchers will present findings on a variety of Earth and space science topics at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Washington, Feb. 17-21.

Contact: Gretchen Cook-Anderson
gcookand@hq.nasa.gov
202-358-0836
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Award Announcement

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Merck / AAAS announce 2005 winners for outstanding undergraduate research programs
The Merck Company Foundation and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) today announced winners of the 2005 awards for the Merck/AAAS Undergraduate Science Research Program.
Merck Company Foundation

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6421
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Prestigious 2004 AAAS Philip Hauge Abelson Prize honors Maxine Singer
For her countless roles in service to science and its potential for improving human welfare, AAAS, the world's largest general scientific society, today named Maxine Frank Singer, President Emeritus of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, to receive the prestigious 2004 AAAS Philip Hauge Abelson Prize.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6421
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Genomics champion Eric Lander receives 2004 AAAS Public Understanding of Science & Technology Award
AAAS, the world's largest general scientific society, today named Eric S. Lander to receive the prestigious Public Understanding of Science and Technology Award.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6421
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
AAAS honors recombinant DNA advisory committee at NIH, citing 30 years of leadership
An advisory committee of the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) today was cited by AAAS, the world's largest general scientific society, for "30 years of providing leadership that has allowed society to proceed responsibly with recombinant DNA research" and gene therapy.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6421
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Educators in Pennsylvania and North Carolina earn top 2004 Mentoring Awards from AAAS
A Bryn Mawr College professor in Pennsylvania and an energetic North Carolina-based engineer this week earned top honors from AAAS, the world's largest general scientific organization, for their tireless efforts to help underrepresented students earn doctoral degrees in the sciences.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6421
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Computer-aided protein design wins prestigious AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize
A process whereby a computer-designed protein was synthesized and confirmed to match the original plan earned the coveted 2003-2004 AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize.
Affymetrix

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6421
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
2004 AAAS International Scientific Cooperation Award to Michael J. Balick
AAAS, the world's largest general scientific society, today named Michael Jeffrey Balick of The New York Botanical Garden to receive the 2004 International Scientific Cooperation Award.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6421
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 10-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Iranian woman's solution to 20-year molecular riddle earns Young Scientist Award
For correctly identifying "a relic from the RNA world" and proving its catalytic potential -- thus, solving a molecular riddle that has baffled others for two decades -- Saba Valadkhan today was named to receive the $25,000 Young Scientist Award, supported by GE Healthcare and the journal Science.
General Electric Healthcare

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6421
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 76-100 out of 111.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>