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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 111.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 8-Mar-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
MIT tool may reveal architectural past
A computer design tool originally created for animation may soon unlock the secrets of the structure of ancient cathedrals, according to MIT Assistant Professor John Ochsendorf of architecture.

Contact: Elizabeth Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 23-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Benefits of eating seafood outweigh risks
Though some species of fish around the world's are likely to be contaminated with mercury, PCBs and other toxins, the benefits of eating seafood continue to outweigh the risks, a panel of scientists has concluded.

Contact: Michael Morrissey
michael.morrissey@oregonstate.edu
503-325-4531
Oregon State University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Technology helps disabled kids find their voice
Laptop computers that combine features from popular toys with innovative technology have rapidly accelerated the learning and communication ability of disabled children, Penn State researchers say. The technology could in the future be adapted to victims of major accidents and the elderly as well.
National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

Contact: Amitabha Avasthi
axa47@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 20-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Understanding and nourishing the roots of food quality
The work of The Organic Center will be featured in a session at the AAAS meeting sponsored by the Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition. This session is entitled "Understanding and Nourishing the Roots of Food Quality," and will be held at 2:00 p.m. on Monday, February 20th.

Contact: Charles Benbrook
cbenbrook@organic-center.org
208-290-8707
The Organic Center

Public Release: 20-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
East Africa's rapid development presents complex push and pull
The landscape is changing in East Africa, and quickly. A migrating and growing population, emerging economies and an increase in agricultural production are leaving their mark on the region's environment. Jennifer Olson at Michigan State University is co-coordinator of Land Use Change, Impacts and Dynamics, an international effort to examine and discover links to how East Africa's economic and social progress is influencing land use, the area's plant and wildlife diversity and land degradation.

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-353-8942
Michigan State University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
What constitutes acceptable earthquake risk in the Central United States?
"Unfortunately earthquake safety in the Midwest is event driven -- most people will not begin to care about the risk until an earthquake happens," says David Gillespie, PhD, a professor of social work at Washington University in St. Louis. "Town leaders need to think long-term about incremental improvements in safety measures that can be sustained. This is a different kind of planning, but it is necessary to be ready for the eventual catastrophic quake that will strike."

Contact: Jessica Martin
jessica_martin@wustl.edu
314-302-2844
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 20-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Unearthing explanations for New Madrid earthquakes
On Dec. 16, 1811, residents of New Madrid, Mo., were wrested from sleep by violent shaking and a deafening roar. It was the first of three massive earthquakes that rocked the central United States between December 1811 and February 1812, even changing the course of the Mississippi River in their aftermath. At the 2006 meeting of AAAS, Professor Mark Zoback discussed what is known about the New Madrid seismic zone and presented geodynamic models of the region.

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Biometric science seeks to avert identity crisis
Two things are certain about biometrics: It is the hot buzzword in identity management for convenience and protection from terrorists and identity thieves – and it's not foolproof. Anil Jain at Michigan State University says the wizardry world of identifying people by unique physical characteristics is filled with promise. But science still has work to do to deliver technology that meets the demands brought by threats of terrorism and identity theft.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-353-8942
Michigan State University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Professor's research with hand-held device brings speech to impaired and disabled individuals
From children with autism or Down's syndrome to adults who have speech loss due to a stroke, more than two million Americans are not able to communicate easily or at all with words. One tool to help them, the B.A. Bar (pronounced BA-bar) has been used with people from the ages of 2 to 89 and has helped them learn or relearn how to speak and become more independent.

Contact: Filip Loncke
ftl4n@virginia.edu
434-825-2367
University of Virginia

Public Release: 20-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stardust in the laboratory
Ernst K. Zinner, PhD, a research professor of physics and of earth and planetary sciences, both in Arts & Sciences, at Washington University in St. Louis, provided an overview of the study of "Stardust in the Laboratory" Monday, Feb. 20, 2006, at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), held in St. Louis. He also participated in the AAAS "Exploring a Dusty Cosmos" press briefing that morning.

Contact: Susan Killenberg McGinn
smcginn@wustl.edu
314-935-5254
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 20-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientists look to the Bahamas as a model for coral reef conservation
One of the greatest challenges facing marine ecologists today is finding innovative ways to reverse the rapid decline of coral reef ecosystems around the world. To address this crisis, an international team of researchers, in consultation with the government of the Bahamas, launched the Bahamas Biocomplexity Project -- an interdisciplinary approach to ecosystem management that project leaders say could serve as a model for coral reef conservation worldwide.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
831-915-0088
Stanford University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Tree of Life project grows more leaves and branches
The Tree of Life, a Web-based database that collects and shares information about the evolutionary history, relationships and characteristics of all groups of organisms, is growing and expanding. The information is accessible to anyone who has access to the Web. Although originally started as a way for scientists to share data, now project organizers are developing ways so members of the public may also contribute pages to the Tree of Life Website.

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 20-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stroke patients regain ability to communicate through use of speech generating device
Currently one million Americans suffer from aphasia. By 2020 the aphasic population of the US is projected to double. Aphasia can affect speech, understanding and/or reading comprehension. Research, using computers to do extended therapy, now indicates that these patients can continue to improve even many years after their stroke or brain trauma. Lingraphicare America has published results of studies which show significant improvements after use of the Lingraphica speech generating device.

Contact: Monica Lange
smedia011@aol.com
609-683-7102
Lingraphicare America

Public Release: 19-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientists discuss evolutionary roots of social behavior
Researchers have long reflected on that most intriguing of evolutionary questions: What led to the emergence of social behavior? A symposium on Feb. 19 at the AAAS annual conference will explore this question.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Karen Strier
kbstrier@wisc.edu
608-262-0302
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 19-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Vital organs in the Earth system: What is the prognosis?
Earth System experts to speak at the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) sponsored session during the 2006 AAAS Annual Meeting. The session title is "Vital Organs in the Earth System: What is the Prognosis?"

Contact: Mary Ann Williams
williams.maryann@gmail.com
518-364-7481
International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme

Public Release: 19-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
NYU'S Childress demonstrates tool for studying hovering flight at international science meeting
A tool for examining hovering flight of insects and birds could allow researchers to study other matters pertaining to locomotion, Stephen Childress, a professor at New York University's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, demonstrated at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in St. Louis.

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
The dawn of deep ocean mining
We're on the brink of the era of deep ocean mining, says a global pioneer in the study of sea floor mineral deposits.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Steven Scott
scottsd@geology.utoronto.ca
416-978-5424
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 19-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
American opinions are split on genetically engineered food
While more than two-thirds of the food in US markets contains at least some amount of a genetically engineered (GE) crop, researchers want to know if Americans consider GE food a health risk or benefit. The result: Americans are split on the issue, but they have become slightly more skeptical over the past three years, according to a new study from Cornell.

Contact: Blaine Friedlander Jr.
bpf2@cornell.edu
607-254-8093
Cornell University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Experts question prevalent stereotypes about autism
Theories about autism spread like wildfire in the media and the general public, a panel of autism experts will reflect on the validity of four widely held - and potentially inaccurate - assumptions about the developmental disability.
NIH/National Institutes of Mental Health

Contact: Morton Gernsbacher
magernsb@wisc.edu
608-262-6989
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 19-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Study finds teen bloggers at risk for cyberstalking
A study of 68 randomly selected weblogs of teenagers aged 13 to 17 finds that many teen bloggers willingly reveal their actual names, age and offline locations, putting them at risk for cyberstalking and cyberbullying. Equally divided between male and female teens with a mean age of 15.47 years, the blogs were examined for content and amount of personal or private information revealed.

Contact: Wendy Leopold
w-leopold@northwestern.edu
847-491-4890
Northwestern University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS denounces anti-evolution laws as hundreds of K-12 teachers convene for 'Front Line' event
The Board of Directors of the world's largest general scientific organization, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), today strongly denounced legislation and policies that would undermine the teaching of evolution and "deprive students of the education they need to be informed and productive citizens in an increasingly technological, global community."

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 19-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Rare gamma-ray flare from a distant star disturbs Earth's daytime ionosphere
On Dec. 27, 2004, scientists detected the largest gamma-ray burst ever recorded. It came from a magnetar -- a neutron star with an enormous magnetic field -- 50,000 light years away. Its powerful rays penetrated deep into the ionosphere, the electrically conductive layer encircling Earth. At the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Stanford electrical engineering Professor Umran Inan will describe what scientists learned from this rare and dramatic atmospheric disturbance.
Stanford University, National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, US Air Force, NASA, DARPA

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientist uses dragonflies to better understand flight
To better understand flight, consider the dragonfly. With an unusual pitching stroke that allows the bug to hover and even shift into reverse, the slender, elegant insect is a marvel of engineering. Cornell Professor Z. Jane Wang presented her research at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting.

Contact: Blaine Friedlander
bpf2@cornell.edu
607-254-8093
Cornell University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Online time may foster youngster's social involvement
Adults sometimes fear that young people spend too much time online and, as a result, are losing a sense of the importance of social interaction and civic involvement. A Northwestern University researcher who for seven years has been studying an online community of 3,000 youngsters aged 10 to 16 disagrees. "The involvement of youngsters in online communities today is qualitatively, not quantitatively, different than it was a generation ago," she says.

Contact: Wendy Leopold
w-leopold@northwestern.edu
847-491-4890
Northwestern University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
The math of deadly waves
When Walter Craig saw the images of the devastating 2004 Boxing Day Indian Ocean tsunami he felt compelled to act.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Walter Craig
craig@math.mcmaster.ca
905-525-9140
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Showing releases 1-25 out of 111.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>