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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 111.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Research News Releases

Public Release: 18-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Ernst Mayr's theory illustrated in genetic epidemiology studies
An evolutionary and population biologist at Washington University in St. Louis says that Mayr's theory has been illustrated nicely in recent years in human genetic epidemiology and population biology studies. Alan R. Templeton, PhD, Washington University professor of biology in Arts & Sciences, said that there is an extensive documentation of genetic interaction over the past few years including his own genetic epidemiology studies of coronary artery disease (CAD).

Contact: Tony Fitzpatrick
tony_fitzpatrick@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 18-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Modern mathematical proofs changing due to collaborations, computers
A Missouri mathematician believes that the state's moniker has great bearing on the status of modern mathematical proofs: Show me. Steven Krantz, PhD, a professor of mathematics in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, said that it is becoming more difficult to verify proofs today and that the concept of the proof has undergone serious change over the course of his 30-plus years career.

Contact: Tony Fitzpatrick
tony_fitzpatrick@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 18-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Toxic waves
According to new statistics, 2005 was the second deadliest on record for Florida's endangered manatees. A leading cause of the fatalities was the toxins produced by "red tide" blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which appear to be growing increasingly common in Florida. Gregory Bossart, from the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution in Ft. Pierce, Fla., and colleagues, have conducted research to be presented at AAAS suggesting that the impacts of the toxins are increasing for humans as well.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mark Schrope
schrope@hboi.edu
772-216-0390
Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 18-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stanford ethics consulting helps researchers navigate sensitive issues
Few basic-science researchers routinely gather information on the ethical aspects of their work, but a pioneering program at the Stanford University School of Medicine is helping scientists navigate the minefield of sensitive issues surrounding biomedical research.

Contact: Susan Ipaktchian
susani@stanford.edu
650-725-5375
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science education lacks a good narrative
There is a good story behind science, but no one is telling it in American classrooms. According to Ursula Goodenough, PhD, a professor of biology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, science continues to be taught from K-12 to the college and university levels, in fragmented, incoherent bits and pieces rather than a coherent narrative, a history of nature.

Contact: Tony Fitzpatrick
tony_fitzpatrick@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 18-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Carnegie Mellon researcher leads team working to create methanol fuel cell
Carnegie Mellon's Prashant Kumta and his group are developing nanostructural catalyst compositions using novel chemistry methods that exhibit excellent catalyticactivity compared to conventional standards catalysts.

Contact: Chriss Swaney
swaney@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-5776
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Pennsylvania tackles nano engineering education
From medicine to materials and manufacturing, nanotechnology is today's watchword but what we do with these new technologies depends on people, and Pennsylvania is leading the way in training nanotechnologists at all levels for all types of nanotech.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 18-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Besides food, farming can provide wildlife habitat and reduce global warming
When people hear the word "agriculture," most think of food. But the benefits of agriculture are much more than farm fresh corn or dairy products. Now scientists are investigating how farmers can manage their land to offer everyone more environmental benefits, and whether farmers could be paid for providing these benefits.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Scott Swinton
swintons@msu.edu
517-353-7218
Michigan State University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Marine mammals are on the frontline of failing ocean health
At the AAAS Annual Meeting press conference, researchers disscuss new links between land-based pollution and diseases in marine mammals, with implications for human health.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 18-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stanford scholar, aka NPR's 'Math Guy,' explains changing nature of mathematical proof
On Feb. 18, Keith Devlin will reveal how mathematicians know what they know. ''Mathematics was built on this comforting idea, of truth being established by proof, that was around for 2,000 years,'' Devlin said. ''Then, in the second half of the 20th century, several major results were proved by methods that challenge that, and as a result we've had to reassess what we mean by proof.''
Stanford University

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Crossing the Valley of Death: Moving science into practice and policy
Society can't afford to take decades to put new insights about the environment into practice, say two scientists from The University of Arizona in Tucson. To shorten the time between the scientific acceptance of new knowledge and its widespread application by citizens and policymakers -- the so-called "Valley of Death" -- environmental scientists need to apply research on how innovations are disseminated and research from marketing.

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Can science-based resource management work?
The Valles Caldera National Preserve in New Mexico is a unique experiment in integrating science into the management of public lands. Thomas W. Swetnam, an original board member of the trust that manages the preserve, will discuss the history of the preserve and its innovative management on Friday, Feb. 17 at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in St. Louis.

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Determining curriculum effectiveness
"This discussion of how to establish curricular effectiveness in mathematics is particularly relevant in light of President Bush's State of the Union address and budget, which includes significant expenditures on improving mathematics and science education in this country," said Jere Confrey, PhD, a professor of mathematics education at Washington University in St. Louis. "If the funds are to make a difference, thorough, valid and fair evaluations of materials will be critical."

Contact: Neil Schoenherr
nschoenherr@wustl.edu
314-935-5235
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
World faces challenge as life expectancies lengthen, scientist says
In the 21st century, state-of-the-art anti-aging technologies may extend human lifespans at an unprecedented rate, bringing with them a host of social and economic challenges, says biologist Shripad Tuljapurkar of Stanford University. He will present his findings on Feb. 17 at the annual AAAS meeting in St. Louis.

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Math Horizons
Princeton professor foresees computer science revolution
At a AAAS panel February 17, Princeton Professor Bernard Chazelle foresees algorithmic advances that he says will transform the way science is done.

Contact: Teresa Riordan
triordan@princeton.edu
609-258-9754
Princeton University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Grand challenges, national lab-style
The W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a Department of Energy-sponsored national scientific user facility, is seeing early promise from its two scientific "grand challenges" that have been investigating enigmas in microbiology and biogeochemistry.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Bill Cannon
cannon@pnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
High school AP courses do not predict college success in science
A survey of 18,000 college students enrolled in introductory biology, chemistry, and physics has found little evidence that high school Advanced Placement (AP) courses significantly boost college performance in the sciences. The study by researchers at Harvard University and the University of Virginia found the best predictors of success in college science courses to be high school classes that foster mathematical fluency, value depth over breadth, and feature certain types of laboratory work.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Education

Contact: Steve Bradt
steve_bradt@harvard.edu
617-275-3628
Harvard University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Too much sugar not good for coral reefs
The race is on to buy up inexpensive land along coastlines for vacation homes and tourist hotels. But increased development can mean more nutrient rich runoff that threatens the very coral reefs attracting tourists in the first place. David Kline at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and colleagues find that bacteria on coral reefs grow out of control as the level of simple sugars in seawater increases.

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
608-790-0590
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
New 'active cookie' helps protect Internet users from cyber crooks
A new technique developed by Indiana University cybersecurity expert Markus Jakobsson provides a strong shield against identity theft and cyber attacks. His "active cookie" is designed to protect against scams involving domain spoofing. Such attacks "poison" a domain name server by planting false information in it, causing a user's request to be redirected elsewhere while telling the user they are at the correct Web site. Jakobsson believes active cookies can provide protection from such attacks.

Contact: Joe Stuteville
jstutevi@indiana.edu
812-856-3141
Indiana University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Virtual playmates help real children with language
Can "virtual" playmates -- what the Northwestern University researcher who created them calls "embodied conversational agents" -- help "real world" children develop language and literacy skills? A Northwestern researcher explains how virtual peers listen to, interact with, interrupt, and tell stories to real-life children and enhance children's emergent literacy.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Wendy Leopold
w-leopold@northwestern.edu
847-491-4890
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Born with a love of speech
Do human newborns develop their preference for speech through in-utero eavesdropping, or is their penchant for speech innate?
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Athena Vouloumanos
athena.vouloumanos@mcgill.ca
514-398-3856
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Humans making wildlife sick
Whether it's monkeys and AIDS or mosquitoes and the West Nile Virus, we're used to thinking of wildlife as reservoirs for emerging infectious human diseases.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Mark Lewis
mlewis@math.ualberta.ca
780-492-0197
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Student group develops grassroots effort to create science policy dialogue
What began as a small group of University of Washington students organizing a public forum on a controversial science policy question has since grown into an organization that is fostering dialogue between scientists, the public, and political leaders. Their project has created a forum for discussion of science, ethics, and public policy, and their success holds lessons for other students interested in organizing similar grassroots groups.

Contact: Justin Reedy
jreedy@u.washington.edu
206-543-3620
University of Washington

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Hooked on fishing, and we're heading for the bottom, says scientist
The world has passed "peak fish" and fishermen's nets will be hauling in ever diminishing loads unless there's political action to stem the global tide of over fishing, says a fisheries expert based at the University of British Columbia.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Daniel Pauly
d.pauly@fisheries.ubc.ca
604-822-1201
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Bringing the zoos to the zebras
The Grevy's zebra is the most endangered member of the horse family in the world, with an estimated 2000 left in the wild. An innovative partnership between Princeton University and Saint Louis Zoo's WildCare Institute is bringing effective conservation of Grevy's zebras within reach for Samburu pastoral cooperatives.

Contact: Blue Magruder
bmagruder@earthwatch.org
978-450-1209
Earthwatch Institute

Showing releases 51-75 out of 111.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>