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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 111.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Grand challenge seeks carbon sequestration, hydrogen production solutions
In just six months of collaboration, a Department of Energy grand challenge led by Washington University in St. Louis has resulted in the sequencing and annotation of a cyanobacterium that could yield clues to how environmental conditions influence key carbon fixation processes at the gene-mRNA-protein levels in an organism.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tony Fitzpatrick
tony_fitzpatrick@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Nanotech to improve health care delivery – at the molecular scale
Nanotechnology's potential for improving drug delivery, tissue regeneration and laboratory miniaturization is being explored by a diverse array of University of Michigan researchers.

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
batesk@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Researcher tackles complexities of obesity, diabetes and their age-related complications
Long-term studies show that calorie restraint is key to preventing obesity and its age-related health complications such as diabetes.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Anne DeLotto Baier
abaier@hsc.usf.edu
813-974-3300
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
USC computer engine orchestrates character gestures
Physics "engines" are used in videogames to make generic on-screen cars turn, skid and stop like real ones without individual programming. Now a USC-built social engine is making on-screen humans smile, frown, turn to meet or avoid gaze, and many other typically human non-verbal communication behaviors in similarly programmed fashion.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: mankin@usc.edu
mankin@usc.edu
310-448-9112
University of Southern California

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Partnering with community groups improves K-12 science education
The recent revolution in the life sciences - the sequencing of the human genome, and development of "high throughput" technologies - has created new opportunities for investigation, and created new challenges for educators. Sarah C.R. Elgin, PhD, a professor of biology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, has been a proponent and creator of partnerships locally and nationwide to improve the life science education both in K-12 schools and at the undergraduate level.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Tony Fitzpatrick
tony_fitzpatrick@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Deep X-ray surveys reveal black hole population, glimpse at the universe
Data from X-ray observatory surveys show that black holes are much more numerous and evolved differently than researchers would have expected, according to a Penn State astronomer.
NASA

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Local involvement in national lands management: Can it work nationwide?
Having a say in how the government manages nearby federal lands makes sense to both local residents and federal officials. But the devil is in the details of how this local input is gathered.

Contact: Dan Bronstein
bronstei@msu.edu
517-432-1277
Michigan State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Michigan State research sheds new light on health dangers of nanoparticles
The nose, usually the first line of defense against inhaled airborne particles that could damage the lungs, may itself be susceptible to the dangers of extremely small particles, called nanoparticles.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Jack Harkema
harkemaj@msu.edu
517-353-8627
Michigan State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
The rising tide of ocean plagues: How humans are changing the dynamics of disease
A leading group of epidemiologists, veterinarians and ecologists report that humans are affecting the oceans in ways that are changing the dynamics of disease. Previously harmless pathogens are becoming killers when combined with contaminants; "good" parasites that invisibly control the balance of species in an ecosystem are disappearing; and changes in sea surface temperature can trigger cholera outbreaks thousands of miles away.

Contact: jbrown@seaweb.org
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 16-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Next good dinosaur news likely to come from small packages
Dinosaurs seem bigger than life – big bones, big mysteries. So it's a delicious irony that the next big answers about dinosaurs may come from small – very small – remains. "Molecules are fossils, too," said Michigan State University zoologist Peggy Ostrom. "We've shown that proteins survive in very old fossils, and proteins can tell us about diseases, about where prehistoric animals fit in the food chain, what they ate and who they are related to."
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peggy Ostrom
ostrom@msu.edu
517-214-3926
Michigan State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Studies of ancient climates suggest Earth is now on a fast track to global warming
Human activities are releasing greenhouse gases more than 30 times faster than the rate of emissions that triggered a period of extreme global warming in the Earth's past, according to an expert on ancient climates.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 16-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Study reveals dramatic metabolic differences in how adults, infants and children process drugs
A Medical College of Wisconsin study provides the strongest and most complete evidence to date of major changes occurring during human development in the types and levels of enzymes responsible for the disposition of drugs and environmental chemicals.

Contact: Eileen LaSusa
elasusa@mcw.edu
414-456-4700
Medical College of Wisconsin

Public Release: 16-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Greenland glaciers dumping ice into Atlantic at faster pace
The amount of ice that Greenland's glaciers dump into the Atlantic Ocean has almost doubled in the last five years because glaciers are moving faster, according to a new Science study. Rising surface air temperatures appear to be triggering the increases in glacier speed in the southern half of Greenland, according to the study's authors who say that many estimates of Greenland's future contributions to sea-level rise could be too low.

Contact: Natasha Pinol or Earl Lane
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science and the end of poverty
Symposium at AAAS will feature scientists from The Earth Institute at Columbia University examining a range of ways that science can help understand and alleviate extreme poverty worldwide.

Contact: Ken Kostel
kkostel@ei.columbia.edu
212-854-9729
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Ancient greenhouse emissions—possible lessons for modern climate
Humans are performing a high-stakes climate experiment by burning fossil fuels that release heat-trapping greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. The outcome of that experiment is uncertain and computer models can do only so much to predict the future.

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
202-326-6431
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
'Nano-keys' bind cell receptors and trigger allergic reactions
The tumblers of life continue to click as Cornell University researchers have fabricated a set of 'nano-keys' on the molecular scale to interact with receptors on cell membranes and trigger larger-scale responses within cells -- such as the release of histamines in an allergic response.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Blaine Friedlander
bpf2@cornell.edu
607-254-8093
Cornell University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Employ more science and technology to reduce world hunger, expert says
Applying science and technology to build a Pluto-bound spacecraft that travels more than 10 times faster than a speeding bullet is a great achievement. But can we apply technology to feed the 800 million hungry people in the world whose plight isn't improving in a modern world?

Contact: Blaine Friedlander
bpf2@cornell.edu
607-254-8093
Cornell University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
World's pledge to halve hunger by 2015 looks like empty promise
Almost 200 countries agreed in 1990 to cut worldwide hunger in half by 2015. That commitment is now looking like an empty promise -- all talk and no action -- according to a Cornell University expert on world hunger.

Contact: Blaine Friedlander Jr.
bpf2@cornell.edu
607-254-8093
Cornell University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Phytoplankton bounce back from abrupt climate change
The majority of tiny marine plants weathered the abrupt climate changes that occurred in Earth's past and bounced back, according to a Penn State geoscientist.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 15-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
NASA satellite technology helps fight invasive plant species
Products based on NASA Earth observations and a new Internet-based decision tool are providing information to help land and water managers combat tamarisk (saltcedar), an invasive plant species damaging precious water supplies in the western United States.
NASA, US Geological Survey, US Department of the Interior, Colorado State University

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.J.Gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 13-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Autistic intelligence measured inaccurately, Université de Montréal study
A research group led by Université de Montréal researcher Dr. Laurent Mottron presented its results on autistic intelligence. The research group, which includes an autistic researcher, has concluded that usual measures of autistic intelligence are in fact measuring incorrectly. The results are presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) conference in St. Louis, which attracts hundreds of scientists.

Contact: Sophie Langlois
sophie.langlois@umontreal.ca
514-343-7704
University of Montreal

Award Announcement

Public Release: 19-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
NOGLSTP to honor GLBT Scientist, Engineer, Educator of Year
The National Organization of Gay and Lesbian Scientists and Technical Professionals (NOGLSTP) is pleased to announce this year's recipients of its GLBT Scientist, Engineer and Educator of the Year Awards: Dr. Kerry Sieh, Dr. Peter Ventzek and Dr. Denise Denton, respectively. These awards will be presented at a ceremony during the NOGLSTP Reception at the upcoming 2006 AAAS Annual Meeting in St. Louis, Missouri, on February 19, from 4-6 p.m.

Contact: Rochelle Diamond
chair@noglstp.org
626-395-4947
NOGLSTP

Public Release: 15-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Educators in Texas and Massachusetts earn top 2005 mentoring awards from AAAS
For their tireless efforts to help underrepresented students earn doctoral degrees in the sciences, two women -- a chemistry professor at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass., and an engineering professor at Texas A&M University, College Station -- will receive top honors from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest general scientific organization.
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Contact: Lonnie Shekhtman
lshekhtm@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Authors, illustrator win AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prize for Excellence in Science Books
Four authors and an illustrator of children's science books won the 2006 AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prize for Excellence in Science Books for recently published works that promote scientific literacy, are scientifically sound, and foster an understanding and appreciation of science in readers of all ages.
Subaru of America

Contact: Lonnie Shekhtman
lshekhtm@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2006
2006 AAAS Annual Meeting
Researchers make elusive discovery and capture prestigious AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize
An elusive discovery by a group of researchers earned them the coveted 2004-2005 AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize, the oldest award conferred by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), publisher of the journal Science. In a paper published in Science, the research team reported observing the spin Hall effect, the first time it has been seen in an experiment.
Affymetrix

Contact: Lonnie Shekhtman
lshekhtm@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing releases 76-100 out of 111.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>