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AAAS Annual Meeting Main Page

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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 136.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Research News Releases

Public Release: 18-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Tackling climate change will require expertise from several fields, Carnegie Mellon professor says
Policymakers can apply the principles of decision science to help the public make informed choices to address global climate change, says Baruch Fischhoff, the Howard Heinz University Professor of Social and Decision Sciences and Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. Fischhoff will give a presentation on mobilizing citizens to combat climate change during the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting, February 15-19 in San Francisco.

Contact: Jonathan Potts
jpotts@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS releases video and first board consensus statement on climate change
The American Association for the Advancement of Science today released a new video as well as the first consensus statement of its board of directors regarding global climate change during a free public town hall meeting in San Francisco, Calif. Reflecting a growing torrent of evidence, the AAAS board statement confirms that "global climate change caused by human activities is occurring now, and it is a growing threat to society."

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 18-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
UI researcher cites need for a 'small view' of the environment
By thinking small, scientists can solve big environmental problems. That is the message University of Iowa researcher Vicki H. Grassian delivered to colleagues Sunday, February 18, at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in San Francisco. She urged them to take a molecular view in order to understand problems, find solutions and move the country toward a sustainable society.

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 18-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Public agrees global warming exists, but divided over seriousness of problem
A majority of Americans agree with most scientists that the Earth is getting warmer, but they are divided over the seriousness of the problem, according to surveys conducted by Jon Krosnick, professor of communication and of political science. Krosnick will detail his survey findings and discuss ongoing research at 8:30 a.m. (Pacific Time) Sunday, February 18, at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Lisa Trei
lisatrei@stanford.edu
650-725-0224
Stanford University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Protecting US crops from terrorist attack to be discussed at 2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
A sound and safe agricultural system is critical to national security, but are US crops, a cornerstone of our nation's economy, vulnerable to attack? The latest information on strategies currently in place and what is still needed to keep US crops safe from terrorist attack will be presented by Jacqueline Fletcher, Sarkeys Distinguished Professor of Plant Pathology at Oklahoma State University, during the 2007 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting in San Francisco, Calif.

Contact: Amy Steigman
asteigman@scisoc.org
651-994-3802
American Phytopathological Society

Public Release: 18-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
From icehouse to hothouse: Melting ice and rising CO2 caused climate shift
Three hundred million years ago, Earth's climate shifted dramatically from icehouse to hothouse, with major environmental consequences. That shift was the result of both rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and the melting of vast ice sheets, new research by University of Michigan paleoclimatologist Christopher Poulsen shows.

Contact: Nancy Ross-Flanigan
rossflan@umich.edu
734-647-1853
University of Michigan

Public Release: 18-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Long-lived deep-sea fishes imperiled by technology, overfishing
Many commercially prized fish from the depths of the world's oceans are severely threatened by over-fishing and the species' ability to recover is constrained by the fishes' long lifespans and low reproductive success, a panel of experts said today at the annual meeting of the American Association of the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Selina Heppell
selina.heppell@oregonstate.edu
541-737-9039
Oregon State University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Universe offers 'eternal feast,' cosmologist says
"Recent developments in cosmology have irreversibly changed our understanding of the structure and fate of our universe and of our own place in it," says Linde, who will discuss the inflationary view of the universe at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science on Feb. 18 in San Francisco.
Stanford University

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientific literacy happens -- when students think for themselves
Give college students less instruction and more freedom to think for themselves in laboratory classes, and the result may be a four-fold increase in their test scores. So says Steve Rissing, a professor of evolution, ecology and organismal biology at Ohio State University. Rissing played a major role in revamping the way the university teaches its introductory-level biology courses.

Contact: Steven Rissing
Rissing.2@osu.edu
614-688-4989
Ohio State University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
'Ten Commandments' could improve fisheries management
Poorly managed marine fisheries are in trouble around the world, researchers say, while ecosystem-based management is a powerful idea that in theory could help ensure sustainable catches -- but too often there's a gap in translating broad concepts into specific action. To address that, one expert today modified a very old set of rules and issued "Ten Commandments" for ecosystem-based fisheries science, in a presentation at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Mark Hixon
hixonm@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-5364
Oregon State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Computer program bridges gap between scientists, water policy makers
A computer visualization tool developed by Arizona State University researchers can simulate the effects environmental and policy factors have on the future of water availability in the Phoenix metropolitan area. The program, called WaterSim, will be demonstrated on February 17 by ASU geography professor Patricia Gober at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in San Francisco.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
602-510-3402
Arizona State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Isotope science to have wide-ranging impact, NSCL researcher says
Nuclear science -- and a host of other endeavors that involve the production, study and use of rare isotopes -- is undergoing a quiet but dramatic revolution. That's the conclusion of Brad Sherrill, professor of physics at Michigan State University, who says that the relatively new ability to create novel forms of atomic nuclei may be one of the great, underappreciated transformations in the physical sciences today. Sherrill is based at MSU's National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL).
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brad Sherrill
Sherrill@nscl.msu.edu
517-333-6322
Michigan State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Worldwide research network needed to really understand what is changing in the Arctic
An Ohio State University geologist today outlined a new plan to oceanographers that would consolidate much of the world's studies on the Arctic region into a global observation network. "This is basically a plan to better understand how the Arctic is changing, but doing it in a new systematic, international and "pan-Arctic' way," explained Berry Lyons, professor in the School of Earth Sciences and director of the Byrd Polar Research Center at Ohio State University.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Berry Lyons
Lyons.142@osu.edu
614-688-3241
Ohio State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Robotic cameras join search for 'Holy Grail of bird-watching'
A high-resolution intelligent robotic video system, developed by researchers at UC Berkeley and Texas A&M University, has been installed in the Cache River National Wildlife Refuge in Arkansas as part of a major effort to obtain conclusive proof that an elusive bird is not extinct. The bird, the famed ivory-billed woodpecker, is also called the "Holy Grail of bird-watching."
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-643-7741
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
SF Bay Area's poor face disproportionate burden of exposure to environmental hazards
A new report issued by the Center for Justice, Tolerance, and Community at the University of California, Santa Cruz, entitled "Still Toxic After All These Years... Air Quality and Environmental Justice in the Bay Area," is the first published analysis of the overall state of environmental disparity in the nine-county region.
California Endowment, California Wellness Foundation, San Francisco Foundation, W. K. Kellogg Foundation

Contact: Jennifer McNulty
jmcnulty@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
High-quality helium crystals show supersolid behavior
High-quality, single-crystal, ultra-cold solid helium exhibits supersolid behavior, suggesting that this frictionless solid flow is not a consequence of defects and grain boundaries in poor-quality, polycrystalline, solid helium, according to a team of Penn State researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientific literacy -- How do Americans stack up?
Having a basic knowledge of scientific principles is no longer a luxury but, in today's complex world, a necessity. And, according to a Michigan State University researcher, while Americans are holding their own, they are not even close to where they should be.

Contact: Jon Miller
jdmiller@msu.edu
517-432-4286
Michigan State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
The last wild hunt -- Deep-sea fisheries scrape bottom of the sea
At a 9 am press conference at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting (AAAS) on February 18th, an international team of leading fisheries economists, biologists, and ecologists will call for the abolition of government fuel subsidies that keep deep-sea fishing vessels moving to deeper waters.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
831-331-0507
SeaWeb

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stem cell transplants explored at Stanford as a possible treatment for hearing loss
As a leader in stem cell-based research on the inner ear at the Stanford University School of Medicine, he's got a step-by-step plan for making this dream a reality.

Contact: Tracie White
tracie.white@stanford.edu
650-723-7628
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Highly accomplished people more prone to failure than others when under stress
Talented people often choke under pressure because the distraction caused by stress consumes their working memory. Highly accomplished people tend to heavily rely on their abundant supply of working memory and are therefore disadvantaged when challenged to solve difficult problems, such as mathematical ones, under pressure, according to research by Sian Beilock, assistant professor of Psychology at the University of Chicago.

Contact: William Harms
w-harms@uchicago.edu
773-569-0503
University of Chicago

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Computer scientists join in search for ivory-billed woodpecker
Computer scientists from Texas A&M University and the University of California, Berkeley, have installed a robot in the Cache River National Wildlife Refuge to help natural scientists from Cornell University's Laboratory of Ornithology and the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission find the rare ivory-billed woodpecker.

Contact: Susan E. Cotton
s-cotton@tamu.edu
979-845-7147
Texas A&M University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Treat childhood trauma by buidling on parental memories of loving care
Infants and preschool-aged children who live in daily circumstances of potential trauma and danger can develop the resilience to cope through treatment that focuses on strengthening parent-child bonds, according to a national expert in child development.
US Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration, Irving Harris Foundation, others

Contact: Janet Basu
jbasu@pubaff.ucsf.edu
415-476-2557
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Enter 'Junior': Stanford team's next-generation robot joins DARPA Urban Challenge
When five autonomous vehicles, including the Stanford Racing Team's winning entry "Stanley," finished the 2005 Grand Challenge in the still Nevada desert, they passed a milestone of artificial intelligence. The robots in the 2007 Urban Challenge, however, will have to handle traffic. It is a tougher test that calls for a new generation of technology. Enter "Junior," the Stanford Racing Team's new brainchild.
Intel, MDV-Mohr Davidow Ventures, Red Bull, Volkswagen of America, Applanix, Google, NXP Semiconductors, DARPA

Contact: David Orenstein
davidjo@stanford.edu
650-736-2245
Stanford University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Harvard scientists partner to develop and distribute new tuberculosis vaccine
Bioengineers and public health researchers at Harvard University have developed a novel spraying method for delivering the most common tuberculosis (TB) vaccine, providing a new low-cost and scaleable technique that offers needle-free delivery and greater stability at room temperature than existing methods. The process could one day provide a better approach for vaccination against TB and help prevent the related spread of HIV/AIDS in the developing world.
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steve Bradt
steve_bradt@harvard.edu
617-275-3628
Harvard University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Steering atoms toward better navigation, physicists test Newton and Einstein along the way
''Navigation problems-how to get from point A to point B-tell us about space-time,'' says Kasevich, a professor in the departments of Physics and Applied Physics who will speak about atomic sensors February 17 in San Francisco at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). ''When we build these de Broglie wave navigation sensors, we're also building sensors that can test these fundamental laws about space-time.''
Stanford University

Contact: Dawn Levy
dawnlevy@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Showing releases 26-50 out of 136.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>