EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
20-Aug-2014 08:44
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Register

Programs and Events

General Information

Sponsors and Exhibitors

Newsroom

Restricted Login Area

Contact Meetings Group

Newsroom HQ:
Hotel Nikko
San Francisco
Grand Ballroom I

Thursday,
15 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
16 - 18 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Monday,
19 February

7:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

All times are US Pacific Standard Time (PST)

Accessibility Option On

Links

Newsroom Main

Newsroom Information

Newsroom Registration

Program

Hotel Information

Credentialing

Special Events

Science Journalism Awards

Contact Press Staff

2006 Highlights

AAAS Annual Meeting Main Page

EurekAlert!

AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 136.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stanford professor to discuss the ups and downs of 'team science'
The most complex quandaries of science cannot be answered by pure disciplinary research, according to Richard Zare, professor and chair of the Department of Chemistry at Stanford University. Zare is a champion of interdisciplinary research, which will be the subject of his presentation at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science at 3:45 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 17, in San Francisco.

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Study verifies more hazardous waste facilities located in minority areas
New research from the University of Michigan is the first known national level study that supports environmental justice scholars' claim that hazardous waste facilities are disproportionately placed in poor, minority neighborhoods.

Contact: Laura Bailey
baileylm@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
The insides of clouds may be the key to climate change
As climate change scientists develop ever more sophisticated climate models to project an expected path of temperature change, it is becoming increasingly important to include the effects of aerosols on clouds, according to Joyce E. Penner, a leading atmospheric scientist at the University of Michigan.

Contact: Laura Bailey
baileylm@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky will discuss stress, health, Feb. 17 at AAAS meeting
Why do humans and their primate cousins get more stress-related diseases than any other member of the animal kingdom? The answer, says Stanford University neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky, is that people, apes and monkeys are highly intelligent, social creatures with far too much spare time on their hands. Sapolsky will discuss the biological and sociological implications of stress at a 12:45 p.m., Feb. 17, AAAS lecture titled "Stress, Health and Coping."

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mathematical model predicts cholera outbreaks
A mathematical model of disease cycles developed at the University of Michigan shows promise for predicting cholera outbreaks.

Contact: Nancy Ross-Flanigan
rossflan@umich.edu
734-647-1853
University of Michigan

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Cellulosic ethanol: Fuel of the future?
In his 2007 State of the Union address, President Bush outlined his plan to reduce the nation's dependency on foreign oil by requiring the production of 35 billion gallons a year of renewable and alternative fuels by 2017. One way to reach this goal is offered by Chris Somerville, professor of biological sciences at Stanford University and director of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Plant Biology, who advocates increasing the production of cellulosic ethanol.

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Changes in west coast marine ecosystems significant
The California Current system has experienced significant changes during the past decade, resulting in dramatic variations in the ecosystem, characterized by shifts in phytoplankton production, expanding hypoxic zones, and the collapse of marine food webs off the western coast of the United States. These changes, driven by new wind patterns, are consistent with predictive models of global climate change.

Contact: Jack Barth
barth@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1607
Oregon State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Newly discovered West Coast arrhythmias cause
Oceanographers, climatologists and ecologists at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting report that unusual ocean conditions and marine die-offs are changing the way scientists think about the future of ocean resources off the US West Coast.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
831-331-0507
SeaWeb

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
US needs to plan for climate change-induced summer droughts
The western United States has experienced increasing drought conditions in recent years -- and conditions may worsen if global climate change models are accurate -- yet the country is doing little to prepare for potential catastrophe. The U.S. should consider a national drought policy to help achieve sustainable water for drinking, agriculture and fisheries, and also manage water supplies to protect environmental values and protect urban property from sea level rise and extreme weather events.

Contact: James Coakley
coakley@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-5686
Oregon State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Americans believe global warming is real, want action, but not as a priority
Most Americans believe global warming is real but a moderate and distant risk. While they strongly support policies like investing in renewable energy, higher fuel economy standards and international treaties, they strongly oppose carbon taxes on energy sources that put carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
It's not easy being green
When it comes to ethanol, it's not easy being greener. Compared to gasoline, producing and using corn ethanol adds fewer greenhouse gases to the environment. But producing ethanol from corn grain requires careful management for the greatest environmental benefits.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station, DuPont Biobased Materials Inc.

Contact: Bruce Dale
bdale@egr.msu.edu
517-896-7264
Michigan State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Programmed for obesity
Environmental chemicals found in everyday plastics and pesticides may influence obesity. Frederick vom Saal, professor of biological sciences in MU's College of Arts and Science, has found that when fetuses are exposed to these chemicals, the way their genes function may be altered to make them more prone to obesity and disease.

Contact: Katherine Kostiuk
KostiukK@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Fixed versus growth intelligence mindsets: It’s all in your head, Dweck says
Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck says that people's self-theories about intelligence have a profound influence on their motivation to learn. People who have a "fixed" theory are mainly concerned with how smart they are -- they prefer tasks they can already do well and avoid ones on which they may make mistakes and not look smart. In contrast, people who believe in a "growth" theory of intelligence want to challenge themselves to increase their abilities, even if they fail at first.

Contact: Lisa Trei
lisatrei@stanford.edu
650-725-0224
Stanford University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Old food meets new technologies, leaves food for thought
There are big changes driven by small forces in two of the oldest industries of the US economy -- agriculture and agricultural production. From the fields to the grocery store shelves, nanotechnology -- technology that allows the control of unique, sub-molecular properties of matter -- is revolutionizing the way food is produced, packaged and distributed, leaving many in the industry grappling with nanotechnology's numerous implications.

Contact: Sue Selke
sselke@msu.edu
517-353-4891
Michigan State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Studies of population genetics, evolution are an exercise in bad taste
Scientific studies of why foods such as Brussels sprouts and stout beer are horribly bitter-tasting to some people but palatable to others are shedding light on a number of questions, from the mechanisms of natural selection to understanding how our genes affect our dietary habits.

Contact: Amanda Siegfried
Amanda.siegfried@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS Panel -- Sustainable aquaculture critical to feed the world
A scientific panel revealed today that rising global demand for healthy seafood has exceeded wild capture fisheries' ability to provide all fish meals demanded by consumers. Aquaculture -- or the farming of seafood -- is helping to fill the gap between sustainable wild supplies and the public demand for seafood.

Contact: Stacey Viera
sviera@nfi.org
703-752-8891
Dittus Communications

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Better freshwater forecasts to aid drought-plagued west
Western droughts wreak social, economic and environmental havoc. Yet the ability to predict drought at seasonal lead times -- months or longer -- has scarcely improved since the 1960s. Computer simulations aim to improve freshwater forecasts.

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Charting our health by the stars
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council grantee Peter Austin and three other researchers have just completed a survey of hospital visits in Ontario, Canada, showing that, compared to people born under other astrological signs, Virgos have an increased risk of vomiting during pregnancy, Pisces have an increased risk of heart failure, and Libras have an increased risk of fracturing their pelvises. In fact, each of the 12 astrological signs had at least two associated medical disorders.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Doré Dunne
dore.dunne@nserc.ca
613-851-8677
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Custom-made cancer cell attacks
Imagine a cancer treatment tailored to the cells in a patient’s body, each person receiving a unique treatment program. This is what Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council grantee Thomas Ruth and his colleagues hope to accomplish within the next decade. Using the TRIUMF particle accelerator based in Vancouver, British Columbia, they are taking vast amounts of radioactive material and separating the particular atoms they need for therapy
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Doré Dunne
dore.dunne@nserc.ca
613-851-8677
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Linguistics expert to speak on language extinction, conservation
University of Alaska Fairbanks professor emeritus Michael Krauss will speak on language extinction during his presentation this week at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in San Francisco.

Contact: Marmian Grimes
marmian.grimes@uaf.edu
907-474-7902
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Hunting martian fossils best bet for locating Mars life, says ASU researcher
Hunting for traces of life on Mars calls for two radically different strategies, says Arizona State University professor Jack Farmer. Of the two, he says, with today's exploration technology we can most easily look for evidence for past life, preserved as fossil "biosignatures" in old rocks. Farmer is reporting on his work today (February 16) at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in San Francisco.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
602-510-3402
Arizona State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
More communication of climate change science won't spur problem solving, says CU researcher
The notion that more information about the science of human-caused climate change will spur effective problem solving by American society is just flat wrong, according to a University of Colorado at Boulder climate policy analyst.

Contact: Lisa Dilling
ldilling@cires.colorado.edu
303-735-3678
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Long road ahead in developing effective avian flu vaccination strategy, Stanford expert says
The near inevitability that influenza will explode into a pandemic in the coming few years has kept researchers searching for a way to prevent the worst effects of infection. The ultimate prize is a highly effective vaccine that could be produced and deployed rapidly.

Contact: Mitzi Baker
mitzibaker@stanford.edu
650-725-2106
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
ASU professor says engineers need to look at sustainability in different light
Engineers, trained to be object problem solvers, need to look at sustainability in a different way than they would approach other subjects in order to fully understand it, according to Arizona State University researcher Brad Allenby. Allenby, a professor in ASU's Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering, is speaking on February 16 at this year's annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in San Francisco.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
602-510-3402
Arizona State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
No reason to panic over 2005 increase in murder rate, reports Carnegie Mellon U. Professor
It remains unclear whether the country faces a new wave of violent crime, says Carnegie Mellon University's Alfred Blumstein. Rates of robberies and murders had been flat since 2000, but in 2005 the FBI reported increases in these crimes that raised some concerns. "The numbers indicate that this increase is not part of a widespread national trend," said Blumstein, who will present his findings at the American Association for the Advancement of Science's annual meeting.

Contact: Ken Walters
walters1@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-1151
Carnegie Mellon University

Showing releases 51-75 out of 136.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>