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2006 Highlights

AAAS Annual Meeting Main Page

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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 136.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Research News Releases

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Birth rate, competition are major players in hominid extinctions
Modern human mothers are probably happy that they typically have one, maybe two babies at a time, but for early hominids, low birth numbers combined with competition often spelled extinction.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Altered ocean currents disturb ecosystem off Northern California and Oregon coast
In 2005, a delay in the arrival of a seasonal, nutrient-rich ocean current off the coast of Northern California and Oregon led to reduced influx of barnacle and mussel larvae to rocky shores, researchers report.

Contact: John A. Barth
barth@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1607
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Nobel laureate Burton Richter to speak about future of particle physics
On Feb. 16, at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in San Francisco, Richter will speak about the future course for elementary particle physics. He will offer a short overview of current research and explain his view of the most important opportunities for the field today.
US Department of Energy, Stanford University

Contact: Neil Calder
neil.calder@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-8707
Stanford University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
UI researcher finds gender gap narrowing among victims of certain crimes
Although the gender gap among victims of homicide and robbery has remained relatively stable over the last 30 years, the gap has closed significantly for aggravated and simple assault because male rates of victimization have declined faster than female rates. That is one finding of a first-of-its-kind study.

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Biomedical engineers advance on 'smart bladder pacemaker'
Duke University biomedical engineering researchers have moved a step closer to a "smart bladder pacemaker" that might one day restore bladder control in patients with spinal cord injury or neurological disease. The team's findings show that a device that taps into the urinary "circuit" in the spinal cord could selectively coordinate the contraction and release of muscles required for maintaining continence.
National Institutes of Health, Paralyzed Veterans of America Spinal Cord Research Foundation

Contact: Kendall Morgan
kendall.morgan@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
New weather, old pipes challenge nation's water supply
The difficult separation of drinking water and sewage may face more challenges than its aging infrastructure can withstand as unpredictable weather conditions produce floods that beset the nation, a Michigan State University water expert says. The nation needs better ways to monitor the safety of drinking water, Joan Rose, MSU's Nowlin Chair in water research, told the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting Friday.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Joan Rose
rosejo@msu.edu
517-432-4412
Michigan State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
New research reveals historic 1990s US crime decline
According to new research by a UC Berkeley law professor, the U.S. crime rate dropped dramatically during the 1990s, producing the longest and deepest crime decline since World War II.

Contact: Janet Gilmore
jangilmore@berkeley.edu
510-642-5685
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 15-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Peruvian glacier may vanish in 5 years
When glaciologist Lonnie Thompson returns to Peru's Qori Kalis glacier early this summer, he expects to find that half of the ice he saw during his visit there last year has vanished. What troubles him the most is his recent observations that suggest that the entire glacier may likely be gone within the next five years, providing possibly the clearest evidence so far of global climate change.

Contact: Lonnie Thompson
Thompson.3@osu.edu
614-292-6652
Ohio State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Antarctic warming to reduce animals at base of ecosystem, shift some penguin populations southward
The warming most global climate models predict will do more harm than simply raise the sea levels that most observers fear. It will make drastic changes in fragile ecosystems throughout the world, especially in the Antarctic. A warming trend during the last few decades in the Antarctic Peninsula has already forced penguin populations to migrate south and perhaps diminished the abundance of krill that are at the base of the massive food chain at the bottom of the world.

Contact: Berry Lyons
Lyons.142@osu.edu
614-688-3241
Ohio State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Decision making isn't always as rational as you think (or hope)
When making tough choices about terrorism, troop surges or crime, we usually go with our gut. The human brain is set up to simultaneously process two kinds of information: the emotional and the empirical. But in most people, emotional responses are much stronger than the rational response and usually take over, according to Michigan State University environmental science and policy researcher Joseph Arvai.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Joseph Arvai
arvai@msu.edu
517-944-1649
Michigan State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
How do we stop genocide when we begin to lose interest after the first victim?
Follow your intuition and act? When it comes to genocide, forget it. It doesn't work, says a University of Oregon psychologist. The large numbers of reported deaths represent dry statistics that fail to spark emotion and feeling and thus fail to motivate actions. Even going from one to two victims, feeling and meaning begin to fade, he said.
William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 15-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Orbiter provides new hints of past groundwater flows on Mars
A spacecraft recently arrived at Mars has provided new evidence that fluids, likely including water, once flowed widely through underlying bedrock in a canyon that is part of the great Martian rift valley.
NASA

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
202-326-6431
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Antarctic temperatures disagree with climate model predictions
A new report on climate over the world's southernmost continent shows that temperatures during the late 20th century did not climb as had been predicted by many global climate models. This comes soon after the latest report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that strongly supports the conclusion that the Earth's climate as a whole is warming, largely due to human activity. It follows a finding last summer by the same researchers showing no increase in Antarctic precipitation in 50 years.

Contact: David Bromwich
Bromwich.1@osu.edu
614-292-6692
Ohio State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Numbers are just numbers, but how you grasp them fills in details
Quickly now, which is a higher risk that you will get a disease: 1 in 100; 1 in 1,000; or 1 in 10? Choosing the correct answer depends on a person's numeracy -- the ability to grasp and use math and probability concepts, according to a presentation at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Blue Cross Blue Shield

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 15-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Joint NASA study reveals leaks in Antarctic 'plumbing system'
Scientists using NASA satellites have discovered an extensive network of waterways beneath a fast-moving Antarctic ice stream and clues as to how "leaks" in the system impact sea level and the world's largest ice sheet. Antarctica holds about 90 percent of the world's ice and 70 percent of the world's reservoir of fresh water.
NASA, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Contact: Tabatha Thompson
Tabatha.Thompson-1@nasa.gov
202-358-3895
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Harnessing the brain's plasticity key to treating neurological damage
With an aging population susceptible to stroke, Parkinson's disease and other neurological conditions, and military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with serious limb injuries, the need for strategies that treat complex neurological impairments has never been greater.
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Contact: Jennifer O'Brien
jobrien@pubaff.ucsf.edu
415-476-2557
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 15-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Europeans' understanding of science, evolution, more advanced than Americans
When it comes to scientific literacy, Americans aren't nearly as evolved as they may think. In fact, only about 40 percent of American adults accept the basic idea of evolution, a figure much lower than any European country.

Contact: Jon Miller
jdmiller@msu.edu
517-432-4286
Michigan State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Study finds subglacial water in West Antarctica considerably more active than previously observed
The recent discovery of a subglacial water system beneath the West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) is causing scientists to rethink the mechanisms that control the flow of ice streams into the Ross Ice Shelf and ultimately into the Southern Ocean, according to a report in the February 15, 2007, issue of Science magazine online.

Contact: Chuck Colgan
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 15-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
West Antarctica's subglacial plumbing system mapped from space
A network of rapidly filling and emptying lakes lies beneath at least two of West Antarctica's ice streams, a new Science study suggests.
NASA

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
415-394-3257
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Harvard team creates spray drying technique for TB vaccine
Bioengineers and public health researchers have developed a novel spray drying method for preserving and delivering the most common tuberculosis (TB) vaccine. The spray drying process could one day provide a better approach for vaccination against TB and help prevent the related spread of HIV/AIDS in the developing world.
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Patrick Rutter
mrutter@deas.harvard.edu
617-496-3815
Harvard University

Public Release: 12-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
MSU expert: See scientists run -- for school board
To improve science literacy, a scientist can teach. But a scientist can also run. National science literacy expert and Michigan State University professor Jon Miller is having a running clinic at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting. The goal is to inspire, educate and arm scientists to run for school boards.

Contact: Jon Miller
jdmiller@msu.edu
517-432-4286
Michigan State University

Award Announcements

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Old dinosaur research leads to new honor
A lifelong obsession with fossils led to Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council grantee Robert Reisz discovering the oldest known dinosaur embryos and the oldest known reptile that stands on two legs. Now, he is being honored for more than 35 years of research excellence by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), which will induct him as a fellow tomorrow.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Doré Dunne
dore.dunne@nserc.ca
613-851-8677
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Rewarding fat rats
When rats and other animals choose things that leads to a "reward," such as food, changes happen in the body and the brain. Understanding those changes has been the focus of Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) grantee Peter Shizgal. Shizgal is being recognized for his contributions by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), which will induct him as a fellow tomorrow during its annual conference in San Francisco.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Doré Dunne
dore.dunne@nserc.ca
613-851-8677
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stopping plants from getting sick
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) grantee James Kronstad grew up on Oregon wheat farms and witnessed first-hand the damage that fungi can do to crops. Since then, he has spent his life looking for the "Achilles' heel" of fungi and developing fungicides. Tomorrow, he is being honored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), which will induct him as a fellow during the association's annual conference in San Francisco.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Doré Dunne
dore.dunne@nserc.ca
613-851-8677
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 16-Feb-2007
2007 AAAS Annual Meeting
Not just babbling
For many years, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council grantee Janet Werker has done research on how infants listen to speech and look for patterns. Now, she is using this research to help children who are developmentally delayed in language. Tomorrow, she will receive a fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) at the AAAS annual conference, held this year in San Francisco.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Contact: Doré Dunne
dore.dunne@nserc.ca
613-851-8677
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Showing releases 76-100 out of 136.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>