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2007 Highlights

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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 99.

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Research News Release

Public Release: 29-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Children with autism may learn from 'virtual peers'
Northwestern University researchers are developing an intervention using "virtual peers" -- technology driven, animated life-size children -- to help develop communication and social skills in children with autism. Preliminary findings suggest children with autism produce more and more "contingent" (conversationally relevant) sentences when interacting with virtual peers than with real-life children. What's more, virtual peers are endlessly patient, never tire and can be programmed to elicit socially skilled behavior.

Contact: Wendy Leopold
w-leopold@northwestern.edu
847-491-4890
Northwestern University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Environmental Science & Technology
Turtle studies suggest health risks from environmental contaminants
The same chemicals that keep food from sticking to our frying pans and stains from setting in our carpets are damaging the livers and impairing the immune systems of loggerhead turtles -- an environmental health impact that also may signal a danger for humans.

Contact: Michael E. Newman
michael.newman@nist.gov
301-975-3025
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 18-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
UBC scientist invokes future generations to save tuna populations from collapse
Balancing short- and long-term fisheries benefits could have prevented the collapse of the cod populations in Atlantic Canada, and is the last best chance for tuna, says University of British Columbia fisheries economist Rashid Sumaila.

Contact: Rashid Sumaila
r.sumaila@fisheries.ubc.ca
604-351-7406
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 18-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Into the abyss: Deep-sixing carbon
Imagine a gigantic, inflatable, sausage-like bag capable of storing 160 million tons of CO2 -- the equivalent of 2.2 days of current global emissions. Now try to picture that container, measuring up to 100 meters in radius and several kilometers long, resting benignly on the seabed more than 3 kilometers below the ocean's surface.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Doré Dunne
dore.dunne@nserc.ca
613-851-8677
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 18-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Oceans, coasts and your health: Reducing risks and reaping rewards
Juli Trtanj in her talk as part of the symposium, "Sustaining Human Health in a Changing Global Environment" at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston, will discuss how NOAA and its partners are working to develop early health warning systems to reduce public health risks and also optimize the health benefits that can come from the sea including pharmaceuticals, natural products and safe sustainable seafood.

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Research

Public Release: 18-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Learning from cod collapse to save tuna
Continued mismanagement could force some tuna populations to quickly go the way of cod, a highly threatened fishery that once helped shape economies of whole nations, leading scientists said in the symposium "Last Best Chance for Tuna: Learning from the Cod Collapse" at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting in Boston on Feb. 18.

Contact: Lee Poston
lee.poston@wwfus.org
202-299-6442
World Wildlife Fund

Public Release: 18-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Unveiling the underwater ways of the white shark
Satellite tracking systems and acoustic sensors are giving researchers insights into the behavior and lifestyles of some very elusive animals in the ocean, including the fabled white shark.

Contact: Louis Bergeron
louisb3@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
To save or savor? It's decision time for Atlantic bluefin tuna
Giant bluefin tuna are in trouble, primarily because the powerful muscles that propel their extensive ocean migrations come with an Achilles' heel: They're tasty. Prized by sushi lovers for their savory succulence, all three species of bluefins have seen their population plummet in the past 50 years thanks to worldwide demand. However, there is hope for bluefin. New advances fueled by modern technologies in ocean science may be clarifying how best to manage Atlantic bluefin.

Contact: Louis Bergeron
louisb3@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mission critical for carbon management
Integrating science and public policy with consumer needs and the global economy is critical if we have any chance of reducing carbon's effects on the climate, say scientists at the 2008 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Scientists from around the globe will discuss the role of science, technology and policy in developing solutions to manage carbon during the symposium The Carbon Journey: Understanding Global Climate Effects and Advancing Solutions.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS symposium to address significant effects of the male parent in reproductive success
A multidisciplinary symposium, sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, entitled "The Father and Fetus Revisited" will address the evidence for male-mediated influences on reproductive success and postnatal development and its implications.
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Contact: Gina Digravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8491
Boston University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Climate change has major impact on oceans
Climate change is rapidly transforming the world's oceans by increasing the temperature and acidity of seawater, and altering atmospheric and oceanic circulation, reported a panel of scientists this week at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Boston.
Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans

Contact: Jane Lubchenco
lubchenco@oregonstate.edu
541-740-1247
Oregon State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Math model identifies key to controlling epidemic
A sophisticated new mathematical model identifies controlling the way that antiobiotics are prescribed and administered is the key to control the growing epidemic of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals around the world.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: David F. Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Ocean's fiercest predators now vulnerable to extinction
The numbers of many large shark species have declined by more than half due to increased demand for shark fins and meat, recreational shark fisheries, as well as tuna and swordfish fisheries, where millions of sharks are taken as bycatch each year. Now, the global status of large sharks has been assessed by the World Conservation Union, widely recognized as the most comprehensive, scientific-based information source on the threat status of plants and animals.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Doré Dunne
dore.dunne@nserc.ca
613-851-8677
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
The art of using science to inform ecosystem restoration in Puget Sound
NOAA's Mary Ruckelshaus will discuss how scientists assist managers with the difficult choices needed to restore the Puget Sound ecosystem. In Puget Sound, scientists and managers must restore endangered orca populations and Chinook salmon populations as they work to restore an entire ecosystem. The needs of these two species present a prime example of how previous single-species strategies do not work in ecosystem restoration.

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Resuscitating our seas -- Noted UNH oceans expert to address annual AAAS meeting
Using the techniques of modern science alongside an historical understanding of the plentiful oceans from bygone days, University of New Hampshire ocean policy and fisheries expert Andrew A. Rosenberg will help address the issue of how to best protect and manage the planet's imperiled ocean resources at this year's American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Boston Feb. 14-18.

Contact: David Sims
david.sims@unh.edu
603-862-5369
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
MIT physicist to describe strange world of quarks, gluons
One of the great theoretical challenges facing physicists is understanding how the tiniest elementary particles give rise to most of the mass in the visible universe. John Negele, the W.A. Coolidge Professor of Physics at MIT, will talk about the theory that governs interactions of quarks and gluons, known as quantum chromodynamics, during a Feb. 17 presentation to the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Boston.

Contact: Elizabeth Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Managing uncertainty important in ecological balance: ASU researcher
The balance of nature looms prominently in the public mind these days. Climate change, genetically modified plants and animals, and globally declining fish stocks are but a few of the issues that remind us that ours is a fragile world. Or is it? It depends on whom you ask, says Ann Kinzig, an Arizona State University associate professor in the School of Life Sciences specializing in biology and society.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Adapting local ecosystems can soften impact of global climate change
"Think globally, act locally" makes for a nice bumper sticker -- but is it an effective policy for coping with global climate change? The short answer is "no," according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We cannot do much locally to lessen the effects of global drivers; therefore, our local policies must focus on adaptation. There is more to the story, however, according to Charles Perrings, a professor of environmental economics at Arizona State University.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Novel mathematical model predicts new wave of drug-resistant HIV infections in San Francisco
A mathematical model shows that a new wave of drug-resistant HIV is rising among among men in San Francisco who have sex with men and that this trend will continue over the next few years, according to a new study from the UCLA AIDS Institute. At the same time, the evolution of drug-resistant HIV may have actually reduced the severity of the city's epidemic, saving many men from becoming infected.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mathematical modeling offers new approaches to fight dual-resistant hospital infections
A mathematical model that looks at different strategies for curbing hospital-acquired infections suggests that antimicrobial cycling and patient isolation may be effective approaches when patients are harboring dual-resistant bacteria. In an era of "superbugs," such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureas (MRSA), this type of modeling, if used to develop policies and treatment protocols, may reduce dual drug-resistant infections in hospitals. The presentation take place on Feb. 17 by Arizona State University professor Carlos Castillo-Chavez at AAAS annual meeting.

Contact: Carol Hughes
carol.hughes@asu.edu
480-965-6375
Arizona State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Small sea creatures may be the 'canaries in the coal mine' of climate change
As oceans warm and become more acidic, ocean creatures are undergoing severe stress and entire food webs are at risk, according to scientists at a press briefing this morning at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Gail Gallessich
gail.g@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Roads not taken disappear more quickly than we realize
According to new research, comparisons and 'attentional collapse' are key reasons why people make mistakes when they try to predict future satisfaction. By studying the anticipated versus actual enjoyment of potato chips as compared to sardines or chocolate, they show that our while comparisons might affect how much we think that we might like something, they don't affect how much we will actually like something.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Amy Lavoie
amy_lavoie@harvard.edu
617-496-9982
Harvard University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
MIT: No easy answers in evolution of human language
The evolution of human speech was far more complex than is implied by some recent attempts to link it to a specific gene, says Robert Berwick, professor of computational linguistics at MIT.

Contact: Elizabeth Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Astrophysical Journal Letters
Many, perhaps most, nearby sun-like stars may form rocky planets
Astronomers have discovered that terrestrial planets might form around many, if not most, of the nearby sun-like stars in the disk of our galaxy. These new results suggest that worlds with potential for life might be more common than thought.

Contact: Lori Stiles
lstiles@u.arizona.edu
520-626-4402
University of Arizona

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientist postulates 4 aspects of 'humaniqueness' differentiating human and animal cognition
Marc Hauser, a Harvard scientist, presents a new hypothesis on what defines the cognitive rift between humans and animals. He identifies four key differences in human thought that make it so unique.

Contact: Amy Lavoie
amy_lavoie@harvard.edu
617-496-9982
Harvard University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 99.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>