2008 AAAS Fellowships for Reporters in Developing Regions, sponsored by Elsevier AAAS joins Science Debate 2008, calling for national candidates’ debate

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Hynes Convention Center
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Thursday,
14 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
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7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

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2007 Highlights

AAAS Annual Meeting Main Page

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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 99.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Solar cell directly splits water for hydrogen
Plants trees and algae do it. Even some bacteria and moss do it, but scientists have had a difficult time developing methods to turn sunlight into useful fuel. Now, Penn State researchers have a proof-of-concept device that can split water and produce recoverable hydrogen.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Andrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
There is 'design' in nature, Brown biologist argues at AAAS
Brown University biologist Kenneth Miller says the best way to communicate evolution in a religious America is to acknowledge that there is indeed a "design" in living things. Miller says scientists should embrace the concept of "design" in a way that supports evolutionary theory. Miller makes his provocative argument at a Feb. 17, 2008, symposium at the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston.

Contact: Wendy Lawton
Wendy_Lawton@brown.edu
401-837-6055
Brown University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Brown expert connects resilience science and marine conservation
Brown University marine conservation expert Heather Leslie explains resilience science, a leading movement in ecology, and how it can produce more effective ocean protection poli-cies at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Boston. Leslie will speak at a Feb. 17, 2008, symposium, and attend a Feb. 14, 2008, press briefing, at the AAAS meeting to discuss the next wave in ocean protection.

Contact: Wendy Lawton
Wendy_Lawton@brown.edu
401-837-6055
Brown University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Will North Atlantic threshold response to ocean changes be enough?
Predictions that the 21st century is safe from major circulation changes in the North Atlantic Ocean may not be as comforting as they seem, according to a Penn State researcher.
National Science Foundation, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Andrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
New research reveals shark superhighways and hotspots
The world's sharks are disappearing. These fearsome yet charismatic fish continue to fall victim to overfishing and many are now at risk of extinction as a result. A panel of researchers will discuss new scientific insights, as well as strategies for shark conservation, at a press conference at the American Association for the Advancement of Science 2008 Annual Meeting in Boston.

Contact: Matthew Wright
mwright@seaweb.org
617-835-9395
SeaWeb

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Impacts of fossil fuels on fish and people
NOAA scientist John Incardona will tell a scientific detective story that uncovers a previously unrecognized threat to human health from a ubiquitous class of air pollutants. Incardona's presentation delves into how one type of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, a compound found in oil, damaged the developing hearts of Pacific herring and pink salmon embryos after the Exxon Valdez spill of 1989.

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Research

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Tracing unidentified nuclear materials: APS, AAAS study group urges new steps
The United States is in danger of losing some of the expertise needed to rapidly and accurately identify nuclear materials smuggled on the black market or used in a nuclear detonation, according to a newly released report by the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
202-326-6431
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Can Dungeness crab and eelgrass help improve management of our marine resources?
NOAA's Anne Guerry will discuss the benefits people obtain from ecosystems in managing marine resources in her AAAS presentation "Ecosystem Services Provided by the Nearshore in Puget Sound: An Analysis of Change." Puget Sound is home to 200 species of fish, 26 species of marine mammals, and over 625 species of seaweed, as well as 3.5 million people. How well the marine systems in Puget Sound function is directly linked to the region's quality of life and economy.

Contact: Ben Sherman
Ben.Sherman@NOAA.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Research

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Health effects of pesticide mixtures: Unexpected insights from the salmon brain
In his research, NOAA scientist Nat Scholz examines how pesticides that run off the land and mix in rivers and streams combine to have a greater than expected toxic effect on the salmon nervous system. These pesticides are widely used in the United States and their occurrence as mixtures in the food supply for humans may also pose an unexpected risk for people.

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
New findings on emerging contaminants
Substances that we use everyday are turning up in our lakes, rivers and ocean, where they can impact aquatic life and possibly ourselves. At a press conference at the 2008 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston, a panel of researchers will discuss how these chemicals are affecting aquatic environments and may be coming back to haunt us in unanticipated ways.

Contact: Matthew Wright
mwright@seaweb.org
617-835-9395
SeaWeb

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Worldwide hunt to solve the mystery of gamma-ray bursts
UK space scientist Emeritus Professor Alan Wells is to speak at the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston in February on "International Cooperation in Developing Swift and its Scientific Achievements."

Contact: Professor Alan Wells
aw@star.le.ac.uk
University of Leicester

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Linguist tunes in to pitch processing in brain
More of the brain is busy processing pitch from language and other sounds than previously thought, according to a researcher in neurophonetics at Purdue University.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Amy Patterson Neubert
apatterson@purdue.edu
765-494-9723
Purdue University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Group led by Stanford physicist says there's an urgent need for nuclear detectives
The first question asked after an atomic explosion in the US (or elsewhere) would be, "Who did this to us?" But the US ability to answer that question rapidly has faded since the end of the Cold War. A group head by Stanford's Michael May, a former director of the nuclear weapons laboratory in Livermore, Calif., says a rejuvenated nuclear forensics program is urgently needed.

Contact: Dan Stober
dstober@stanford.edu
650-721-6965
Stanford University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
You can't teach old materials new tricks
A more sensitive, more selective and easily deployable radiation detection material is necessary to meet complex 21st century challenges. In the AAAS symposium "Radiation Detectors for Global Security: The Need for Science-Driven Discovery," researchers addressed some of the technical challenges and gaps and proposed a science-driven approach to uncovering novel materials that will benefit national security and medicine.

Contact: Andrea Turner
andrea.turner@pnl.gov
509-375-3893
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Valuing ocean services in the Gulf of Maine -- New approaches for conflict resolution
Michael Fogarty, a NOAA biologist, says interactions among species, the effects of climate change, and the effects of human impacts such as harvesting are among the factors that need to be considered in moving toward an ecosystem-based fishery management plan. Conventional fishery management practices concentrate on individual species rather than a holistic approach that looks at the bigger picture.

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Research

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
From stem cells to organs: The bioengineering challenge
For more than a decade, Peter Zandstra has been working at the University of Toronto to rev up the production of stem cells and their descendants. The raw materials are adult blood stem cells and embryonic stem cells. The end products are blood and heart cells -- lots of them. Enough mouse heart cells that they form beating tissue.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Doré Dunne
dore.dunne@nserc.ca
613-851-8677
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Arizona State bioethicist says mental illness is subject to biological and sociocultural factors
Biology is crucial to understanding psychosis, "but there is more to psychosis than mere biology," says Jason Robert, an Arizona State University bioethicist and philosopher of science. He will bring conceptual research and perspective to the subject of cross-cultural issues in defining mental illness during a presentation on Feb. 16 at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting.

Contact: Carol Hughes
carol.hughes@asu.edu
480-965-6375
Arizona State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Iowa Staters talk biofuels, healthy oils and 'pharma crops' at AAAS meeting
Iowa State researchers discuss energy and agriculture, the economic risks of 'pharma crops' and the role plant breeders play in producing healthier foods during their presentations at the AAAS annual meeting in Boston.

Contact: Mike Krapfl
mkrapfl@iastate.edu
515-294-4917
Iowa State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Link between treating osteoporosis with bisphosphonates and incidence of bone necrosis examined
On Saturday, Feb. 16, at 10 a.m., in Hynes Convention Center Rm. 112, Columbia University's Dr. John Grbic will be part of an AAAS press conference in Boston that focuses on the pharmacology of bisphosphonates, with data supporting the use of BFs therapy in both oncology and non-oncology patients. He will later discuss these findings at a scientific symposia session from 1:45 p.m. – 3:15 p.m. in Rm. 206.

Contact: Susan Craig
sc2756@columbia.edu
212-203-8599
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
MIT program aids graduate students
An MIT PhD candidate in electrical engineering and computer science will describe a novel professional development program for graduate students and its impact at MIT at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston.

Contact: Elizabeth A. Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
MIT expert: How to toughen up environmental treaties
The Kyoto Protocol is one of more than 100 global environmental treaties negotiated over the past 40 years to address pollution, fisheries management, ocean dumping and other problems. But according to MIT Professor Lawrence Susskind, an expert in resolving complex environmental disputes, few of the agreements have done more than slow the pace of ecological damage, due to lack of ratification by key countries, insufficient enforcement and inadequate financial support.

Contact: Elizabeth Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
MIT professor to discuss future of biofuels
High oil prices, energy security considerations and fears about global warming have helped revive interest in renewable energy sources like biofuels. But there are a few catches. For example, the more corn is used in ethanol production, the less is available for food. MIT Professor Gregory Stephanopoulos will lead a discussion of how to overcome these limitations and make biofuels a significant part of the US energy supply.

Contact: Elizabeth Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Is that sea otter stealing your lunch -- or making it?
Hunted to near extinction, sea otters are making a steady comeback along the Pacific coast. Their reintroduction, however, is expected to reduce the numbers of several key species of commercially valuable shellfish dramatically, such as sea urchins and geoducks.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Doré Dunne
dore.dunne@nserc.ca
613-851-8677
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
MIT: Turning 'funky' quantum mysteries into computing reality
The strange world of quantum mechanics can provide a way to surpass limits in speed, efficiency and accuracy of computing, communications and measurement, according to research by MIT scientist Seth Lloyd.

Contact: Elizabeth Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Fish devastated by sex-changing chemicals in municipal wastewater
While most people understand the dangers of flushing toxic chemicals into the ecosystem through municipal sewer systems, one potentially devastating threat to wild fish populations comes from an unlikely source: estrogen. After an exhaustive seven-year research effort, Canadian biologists found that miniscule amounts of estrogen present in municipal wastewater discharges can decimate wild fish populations living downstream.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Doré Dunne
dore.dunne@nserc.ca
613-851-8677
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Showing releases 26-50 out of 99.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>