2008 AAAS Fellowships for Reporters in Developing Regions, sponsored by Elsevier AAAS joins Science Debate 2008, calling for national candidates’ debate

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Thursday,
14 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
15 - 17 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

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18 February

7:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

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2007 Highlights

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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 99.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Brain waves pattern themselves after rhythms of nature
The same rules of physics that govern molecules as they condense from gas to liquid, or freeze from liquid to solid, also apply to the activity patterns of neurons in the human brain. University of Chicago mathematician Jack Cowan will offer this and related insights on the physics of brain activity this week in Boston during the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
MIT researcher: Learning about brains from computers, and vice versa
For many years, Tomaso Poggio's lab at MIT ran two parallel lines of research. Some projects were aimed at understanding how the brain works, using complex computational models. Others were aimed at improving the abilities of computers to perform tasks that our brains do with ease. But recently Poggio has found that the two tasks have begun to overlap to such a degree, that it's now time to combine the two lines of research.

Contact: Elizabeth Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Coal gasification -- myths, challenges and opportunities
With demand for electricity expected to double by 2050 and renewable resources still years away from offsetting increased demand, it is clear -- coal is here to stay. But can "dirty" coal be used cleanly? The answer may be a resounding yes if gasification becomes common place, researchers said today at the 2008 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston.

Contact: Christy Lambert
christy.lambert@pnl.gov
206-914-3669
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
'Women and children first'
If you were a man on the Titanic, which side of the ship would have given you the best chance of making it into a lifeboat -- and surviving?

Contact: Doré Dunne
dore.dunne@nserc.ca
613-851-8677
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
New tool for resolving fisheries conflicts
One possible solution to fisheries bycatch, advanced by NSERC grantee Dr. Suzana Dragicevic of Simon Fraser University in British Columbia involves digital maps and mathematical analysis to visualize and better understand the location of the most vulnerable marine habitats.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Doré Dunne
dore.dunne@nserc.ca
613-851-8677
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Worldwide effort bringing ALMA telescope into reality
In the thin, dry air of northern Chile's Atacama Desert, at an altitude of 16,500 feet, an amazing new telescope system is taking shape, on schedule to provide the world's astronomers with unprecedented views of the origins of stars, galaxies, and planets. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array will open an entirely new "window" on the Universe, allowing scientists to unravel longstanding and important astronomical mysteries.

Contact: Dave Finley
dfinley@nrao.edu
575-835-7302
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Moving beyond tamoxifen: Drug discovery and the future of selective hormone receptor modulators
How did a failed contraceptive become the first targeted therapy for the treatment of breast cancer? The transformation of tamoxifen, from cast-off to lifesaver, laid the foundation for a new class of therapeutics -- selective estrogen receptor modulators. V. Craig Jordan, a researcher at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, Jordan reports on efforts to use the lessons from tamoxifen to develop new hormone receptor-related drugs for both women and men.

Contact: Greg Lester
gregory.lester@fccc.edu
215-316-8977
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Past greenhouse warming events provide clues to what the future may hold
Scientists studying an extreme period of global warming 55 million years ago are piecing together an increasingly detailed picture of its causes and consequences. Their findings describe what may be the best analog in the geologic record for the global changes likely to result from continued carbon dioxide emissions from human activities.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Ecology
Antarctic life hung by a thread during ice ages
A report published in the March issue of Ecology argues that the extreme cold and environmental conditions of past Ice Ages have been even more severe than seen today and changed life at the Antarctic, forcing the migration of many animals such as penguins, whales and seals. Understanding the changes of the past may help scientists to determine how the anticipated temperature increases of the future will work to further transform this continent.
British Antarctic Survey

Contact: Nadine Lymn
nadine@esa.org
202-833-8773
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Personalized medicine can cut breast cancer risk
The time has come for breast cancer risk assessment, counseling and genetic testing to move from cancer specialists to the realm of primary care. A growing body of evidence has documented the benefits of preventive measures for high-risk women including those with mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Referral for cancer-risk assessment and BRCA testing in the primary care setting is a necessary step towards personalized medicine for women at risk.

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-702-6241
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Religion colors Americans' views of nanotechnology
Is nanotechnology morally acceptable? For a significant percentage of Americans, the answer is no, according to a recent survey of Americans' attitudes about the science of the very small.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dietram Scheufele
scheufele@wisc.edu
608-262-1614
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
CIRA scientist among authors of book celebrating 50 years of Earth observations from space
Stan Kidder, a researcher at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere at Colorado State University, will talk about contributions satellites make to weather forecasting on Feb. 17 at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Boston.
National Academies

Contact: Emily Narvaes Wilmsen
Emily.Wilmsen@colostate.edu
970-491-2336
Colorado State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Panel identifies greatest technological research challenges of the 21st century
A panel of maverick thinkers, convened by the National Academy of Engineering, today identified what they consider to be the greatest technological research challenges facing society in the coming century. In the following Q&A, panel member Rob Socolow of Princeton University expands upon the NAE Grand Challenges project and the role that technological innovation plays in a vibrant society.
National Academy of Engineering

Contact: Teresa Riordan
triordan@princeton.edu
609-258-9754
Princeton University, Engineering School

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Bottom trawling impacts, clearly visible from space
Bottom trawling, an industrial fishing method that drags large, heavy nets across the seafloor stirs up huge, billowing plumes of sediment on shallow seafloors that can be seen from space.

Contact: Elliott Norse
elliott@mcbi.org
425-985-6355
SeaWeb

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Oregon researchers study widespread areas of low oxygen off northwest coast
A team of scientists, including NOAA's William Peterson, studying the California Current -- a slow-moving mass of cold water that travels south along the coast from British Columbia to Baja California -- are seeing increasing areas of water off Washington and Oregon with little or no oxygen, possibly resulting in the deaths of marine animals that cannot leave the low-oxygen areas.

Contact: Brian Gorman
brian.gorman@noaa.gov
206-526-6613
NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Nanotechnology's future depends on who the public trusts
When the public considers competing arguments about a new technology's potential risks and benefits, people will tend to agree with the expert whose values are closest to their own, no matter what position the expert takes. The same will hold true for nanotechnology, a key study has found.
National Science Foundation, Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies, Oscar M. Ruebahausen Fund

Contact: Colin Finan
colin.finan@wilsoncenter.org
202-691-4321
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars/Science and Technology Innovation Program

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Journal of Agricultural Economics
Policies key as ethanol 'revolution' links agriculture, energy sectors
The recent boom in production of ethanol from corn grain has tightly linked the agriculture and energy sectors in an unprecedented fashion. Purdue University researchers developed a model, based on a range of possible oil prices, that predicts impacts of federal economic policies on future consumer and government costs, ethanol production and many other aspects of the two sectors.

Contact: Douglas M. Main
dmain@purdue.edu
765-496-2050
Purdue University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
ASU researcher finds direct democracy in science too much of a good thing
Publicly funded science in America is accountable to the people and their government representatives. However, this arrangement raises questions regarding the effect such oversight has on science. It is a problem of particular relevance as the nation prepares for the end of the Bush administration, which has taken divisive stances on a number of issues, including stem cell research and global warming. Striking a balance is an essential question for Daniel Sarewitz of Arizona State University.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Nanotech's health, environmental impacts worry scientists and the public
Nanotechnology, which is making its way into products ranging from food storage containers to computers, is seen differently among scientists than the general public, with scientists appearing to be more concerned in some areas. This is among the findings of a recent survey that will be presented by Elizabeth Corley, an Arizona State University assistant professor, on Feb. 15 at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stanford's Bill Perry to speak at AAAS on engineering's 'Grand Challenges'
At the request of the National Academy of Engineering, Stanford's William Perry, an engineering professor and former secretary of defense, has led a team of leading technical thinkers who have put together a list of "Grand Challenges for Engineering in the 21st Century."

Contact: Dan Stober
dstober@stanford.edu
650-721-6965
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Parental intervention boosts education of kids at high risk of failure
An eight-week-long intervention program aimed at parents from low socioeconomic backgrounds reaped significant educational benefits in their preschool-aged children, a University of Oregon research fellow reported today at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Institute of Education Science

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
USC and second sight announce European clinical trial for Argus II retinal implant
Artificial retinal implant takes next step by expanding clinical trial.
NIH/National Eye Institute, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, W.M. Keck Foundation, Research to Prevent Blindness, Albaugh Family Trust

Contact: Jon Weiner
jon.weiner@usc.edu
323-442-2830
University of Southern California

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
MIT researcher addresses biomedical engineering challenges
Much of the work in MIT Institute Professor Robert Langer's prolific lab sounds like something straight from the pages of science fiction, but its products are already saving lives around the world in a variety of ways. Langer will speak about the great challenges facing biomedical engineering in the next century, at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston, on Friday afternoon, Feb. 15.

Contact: Elizabeth Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Dr. Caroline Wagner presents on dynamic self-organizing networks in higher education
SRI senior policy analyst Caroline Wagner, PhD, will deliver a talk titled Science, Ethics, and Institutional Traditions Around the World at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston from Feb. 14-18. Wagner's talk is based on research for her new book, The New Invisible College: Science for Development, which is being published in Spring 2008 by The Brookings Institution Press.

Contact: Ellie Javadi
ellie.javadi@sri.com
650-859-4874
SRI International

Public Release: 14-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
New study shows extent of harmful human influences on global ecosystems
More than 40 percent of the world's oceans are heavily impacted by human activities, including overfishing and pollution, according to a new study that will appear in tomorrow's peer-reviewed journal Science.
NOAA

Contact: John Leslie
john.leslie@noaa.gov
301-713-2087
NOAA Headquarters

Showing releases 51-75 out of 99.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>