2008 AAAS Fellowships for Reporters in Developing Regions, sponsored by Elsevier AAAS joins Science Debate 2008, calling for national candidates’ debate

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Hynes Convention Center
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Thursday,
14 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
15 - 17 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

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18 February

7:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

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2007 Highlights

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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-99 out of 99.

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Research News Release

Public Release: 14-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Animated tutors help remedial readers, language learners, autistic children
Tools developed by researchers exploring language and speech comprehension can be powerful aids for remedial readers, children with language challenges, and anyone learning a second language, according to psychology professor Dominic Massaro of the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Contact: Jennifer McNulty
jmcnulty@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 14-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
New studies reveal surprises about deep sea corals and their past
New research shows that the second most diverse group of hard corals first evolved in the deep sea, and not in shallow waters. This finding contradicts a long-established theory suggesting that corals evolved in shallow water before migrating into deeper habitats. A panel of researchers will discuss this and other new discoveries about deep-sea corals at a press conference at the 2008 American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting in Boston.

Contact: Matthew Wright
mwright@seaweb.org
617-835-9395
SeaWeb

Public Release: 14-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
NIH collaborates with EPA to improve the safety testing of chemicals
Testing the safety of chemicals ranging from pesticides to household cleaners will benefit from new technologies and a plan for collaboration, according to federal scientists from the National Institutes of Health and the Environmental Protection Agency, who today announced a new toxicity testing agreement. The concept behind this agreement is highlighted in the Feb. 15, 2008, issue of the journal Science.

Contact: Raymond MacDougall
macdougallr@mail.nih.gov
301-402-0911
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 14-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
First map of threats to marine ecosystems shows all the world's oceans are affected
As vast and far-reaching as the world's oceans are, every square kilometer is affected by human activities, according to a study in the journal Science by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and others.

Contact: Patric Lane
patric_lane@unc.edu
919-962-8596
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Public Release: 14-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Scientists reveal first-ever global map of total human effects on oceans
More than 40 percent of the world's oceans are heavily affected by human activities, and few if any areas remain untouched, according to the first global-scale study of human influence on marine ecosystems. By overlaying maps of 17 different activities such as fishing, climate change, and pollution, the researchers have produced a composite map of the toll that humans have exacted on the seas.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Gail Gallessich
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 14-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stanford researchers say living corals thousands of years old hold clues to past climate changes
Stanford researcher Brendan Roark to talk at AAAS meeting about discovery that deep-water corals off Hawaii are as old as 4,000 years. Coral may hold clues to ocean and climate changes of past centuries, and must be protected from devastation from fishing ships and coral harvesters.

Contact: Dan Stober
dstober@stanford.edu
650-721-6965
Stanford University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
NOAA science story tips -- AAAS 2008 edition
The following is a collection of marine science story ideas for reporters from the National Oceanographic Athmospheric Administration.

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 14-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
IdentiGEN founder says access to DNA from cloned animals should be made public
In order for meat producers and retailers to satisfy anticipated consumer desires to avoid meat and milk from cloned animals, access to DNA from every unique clone should be made public so that DNA traceability technology can be used, according to Patrick Cunningham of Dublin's Trinity College and chief scientific adviser to the government of Ireland, who will speak at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Boston on Feb. 15.

Contact: Michele Wells
mwells@indra.com
303-417-0696
Wells Communications, Inc.

Public Release: 14-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Map is first to track global human influences on ocean ecosystems
The first global map of human influences on marine ecosystems has been constructed by a team of researchers, including a Stanford University scientist among the principal investigators, by gathering and interpreting massive amounts of data from the professional literature and from researchers around the world. This study suggests that about 41 percent of oceans bear a serious human "footprint " and that few blue spots on our planet are likely pristine.
University of California-Santa Barbara, the National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Louis Bergeron
louisb3@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 11-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Penn childhood obesity researchers panelists at AAAS Town Hall Event
Shiriki Kumanyika, PhD, MPH, professor of epidemiology and associate dean for health promotion and health prevention, at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and Virginia A. Stallings, MD, PhD, the Jean A. Cortner Endowed Chair in Pediatric Gastroenterology at Penn and Professor of Pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, will be part of a panel at a special public session, "Understanding Obesity and Childhood" at the 2008 American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-459-0544
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Grant Announcement

Public Release: 25-Oct-2007
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Yale affiliates named AAAS fellows for distinction in Science
Ten renowned scientists and educators at Yale have been named as Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, an honor bestowed upon members of the organization by their peers.

Contact: Janet Emanuel
janet.emanuel@yale.edu
203-432-2157
Yale University

Award Announcement

Public Release: 20-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
NOVA documentary about Percy Julian wins AAAS Science Journalism Award
"Forgotten Genius," a two-hour documentary about the life of chemist Percy Julian, funded in part by the National Science Foundation has received a prestigious award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Maria C. Zacharias
mzachari@nsf.gov
703-292-8070
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 14-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Merck and AAAS announce 2008 Winners of Outstanding Undergraduate Research Programs
Fourteen colleges and universities have been selected for awards from the Merck/AAAS Undergraduate Science Research Program. Sponsored by the Merck Institute for Science Education and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the program awards provide up to $60,000, paid over three years, for use by the biology and chemistry departments at the recipient institution.

Contact: Molly McElroy
mmcelroy@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS honors climate scientist James Hansen
James Hansen, a government scientist who has spoken forcefully about human influence on global climate despite pressure to alter his message, is the recipient of the 2007 AAAS Award for Scientific Freedom and Responsibility.

Contact: Molly McElroy
mmcelroy@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Authors, illustrator Win AAAS/Subaru SB&F
Four authors and an illustrator of children's science books have won the 2008 AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prize for Excellence in Science Books, a prize intended to promote science literacy by drawing attention to the importance of good science writing and illustration. AAAS and Subaru co-sponsor these prizes for recently published works that are scientifically sound and foster an understanding and appreciation of science in readers of all ages.

Contact: Molly McElroy
mmcelroy@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
2007 AAAS Philip Hauge Abelson Prize Awarded to Burton Richter
Burton Richter, a Nobel laureate in physics and former director of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, has been awarded the 2007 AAAS Philip Hauge Abelson Prize for his outstanding contributions to science and its use in shaping of public policy.

Contact: Molly McElroy
mmcelroy@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
2007 AAAS Mentor Award goes to Carlos Castillo Chavez of Arizona State University
Carlos Castillo Chavez, a professor of mathematics, statistics and life sciences at Arizona State University, has been honored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for his efforts to help underrepresented students earn doctoral degrees in the sciences.

Contact: Molly McElroy
mmcelroy@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Neil deGrasse Tyson receives 2007 AAAS Public Understanding of Science and Technology Award
The American Association for the Advancement of Science has named astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, as winner of the 2007 AAAS Public Understanding of Science and Technology Award.

Contact: Molly McElroy
mmcelroy@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
2007 AAAS International Scientific Cooperation Award
The American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world's largest general scientific society, has named the pioneering climate scientist Robert Watson from the United Kingdom as winner of the 2007 AAAS International Scientific Cooperation Award.

Contact: Molly McElroy
mmcelroy@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 28-Jan-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS/EurekAlert! build bridges with Middle Eastern science community through journalism fellowships
EurekAlert!, the global science news service operated by AAAS, in cooperation with the National Association of Science Writers in the United States and the Arab Science Journalists Association, is happy to announce the recipients of the 2008 AAAS Fellowships for Reporters in Developing Regions, sponsored by Elsevier. The award will allow the four fellowship recipients to cover the latest research and mingle with their fellow science writers from around the world at the AAAS Annual Meeting, Feb. 14-18, in Boston.
Elsevier

Contact: Rahman A. Culver
rculver@aaas.org
202-326-6213
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 25-Oct-2007
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS and Brandeis University announce 2007 Fellows
Michael Rosbash, PhD, of Brandeis University has been awarded the distinction of Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as a Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. This year 471 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

Contact: Laura Gardner
gardner@brandeis.edu
781-736-4204
Brandeis University

Meeting Announcement

Public Release: 17-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Symposium on drug-resistant diseases set for annual AAAS conference
Drug resistance is a major public health concern, and the problem of resistance continues to grow. Recently, infectious disease modelers have begun to develop mathematical models for predicting the evolutionary dynamics of drug resistance. This symposium brings together experts in the real world of infectious diseases and mathematical modelers. Speakers show how models can be designed and analyzed so that theoretical work can have a significant effect on informing medical and public health decision-making processes.

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 13-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Singapore's BIOPOLIS and FUSIONOPOLIS on stage in Boston this week
Singapore's focused transformation into a scientific powerhouse in the biomedical sciences and physical sciences and engineering will stage a presence this week in Boston at the annual meetings of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences and the Fulbright Academy of Science and Technology.

Contact: Cathy Yarbrough
sciencematter@yahoo.com
858-243-1814
Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore

Public Release: 12-Feb-2008
2008 AAAS Annual Meeting
Poverty and the Brain
Dr. Martha Farah, director of Penn's Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, will present Poverty and Brain Development: Correlations, Mechanisms and Societal Implications at the 2008 American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting.

Contact: Jordan Reese
jreese@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Showing releases 76-99 out of 99.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4