2009 AAAS Annual Meeting -- Advance news and information

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Newsroom HQ:
Hyatt Regency
Chicago
Acapulco Room, West Tower

Thursday,
12 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
13 - 15 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Monday,
16 February

7:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 122.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 6-Mar-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Synthetic biology can help extend anti-malaria drug effectiveness
Synthetic biology can not only provide a simple and much less expensive means of making artemisinin, the most powerful anti-malaria drug in use today, but can also help extend the drug's effectiveness. Bundling microbial-based artemisinin as part of an anti-malarial drug "cocktail" rather than selling it as a monotherapy should delay or even prevent malaria parasites from developing resistance.
US Department of Energy, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Video game Everquest 2 provides new way to study human behavior, says U of Minnesota researcher
A research study by a University of Minnesota computer scientist and colleagues from across the country shows that online, interactive gaming communities are now so massive that they mirror traditional communities.

Contact: Ryan Mathre
mathre@umn.edu
612-625-0552
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 17-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Anthropologist's studies of childbirth bring new focus on women in evolution
Contrary to the TV sitcom where the wife experiencing strong labor pains screams at her husband to stay away from her, women rarely give birth alone. Assisted birth has likely been around for millennia, possibly dating as far back as 5 million years ago when our ancestors first began walking upright, according to University of Delaware paleoanthropologist Karen Rosenberg. She says that social assistance during childbirth is just one aspect of our evolutionary heritage that makes us distinctive as humans.

Contact: Tracey Bryant
tbryant@udel.edu
302-831-8185
University of Delaware

Public Release: 16-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Arizona State's Lawrence Krauss predicts a 'miserable future' for our universe
Our picture of the universe has changed more in the past decade or so than it did in the past century. The changes have had a significant effect upon our understanding of the future of the universe and life within it.

Contact: Nikki Staab
nstaab@asu.edu
480-727-9329
Arizona State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet melting, rate unknown
The Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets are melting, but the amounts that will melt and the time it will take are still unknown, according to Richard Alley, Evan Pugh professor of geosciences, Penn State.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 16-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
State of the steric sea level rise, 1955-2003
Based on a detailed analysis of ocean vertical temperature profiles for the 1955-2008 period, Sydney Levitus, lead author, talks about the change of global average sea level induced by the observed warming of the world ocean during the past 53 years. The warming of the world ocean is consistent with the amount of warming expected as a result of the observed increase in greenhouse gases in earth's atmosphere.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 16-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Accelerating urbanization presents daunting engineering challenge
Ensuring the world's fast-growing urban regions function efficiently in the future will demand a much more complex public infrastructure than anything yet designed. Engineers are facing challenges of not only dealing with information, communication and public-utility systems that are themselves becoming more complicated, but must develop the technological advances necessary to effectively interconnect and control these systems on larger scales than anything achieved to date.

Contact: Joe Kullman
joe.kullman@asu.edu
480-965-8122
Arizona State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Cosmologists aim to observe first moments of universe
During the next decade, a delicate measurement of primordial light could reveal convincing evidence for the popular cosmic inflation theory, which proposes that a random, microscopic density fluctuation in the fabric of space and time gave birth to the universe in a hot big bang approximately 13.7 billion years ago.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 16-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Food counterfeiting, contamination outpace international regulatory systems
Intentionally contaminated Chinese milk killed several children and sickened 300,000 more, causing concern around an increasingly connected world economy. Demand for inexpensive products virtually guarantees future repeats of food adulteration and counterfeiting from overseas, Michigan State University researchers said, as trade volumes overwhelm regulatory oversight.

Contact: Mark Fellows
mark.fellows@ur.msu.edu
517-819-5437
Michigan State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
College science requirements keep US ahead of world, MSU researcher argues
Despite frequent warnings of the inadequacy of education in the United States, citizens here are still among the world's most scientifically literate, a Michigan State University researcher said. You can thank those general education requirements that force English majors to sit through biology classes and budding engineers to read Hemingway, Jon Miller said.

Contact: Mark Fellows
mark.fellows@ur.msu.edu
517-819-5437
Michigan State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Carbon accounting from atmospheric measurements -- the aircraft perspective
The NOAA/ESRL aircraft network has embarked on many recent intensive efforts to explore processes at the 10 to 100 km scale. In particular, air mass-following experiments using small aircraft can be used to observe ground emission or uptake of CO2 in a single air mass as it moves across an agricultural or urban landscape. The net result is a validation of ground-level emissions estimates by direct measurements of changes in atmospheric CO2.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Past trends in hurricane activity and inferences for the future
Knutson will discuss analysis of historical ship track records suggesting that reporting coverage of was too sparse to detect all tropical storms and therefore tropical storm counts do not have any significant trends between 1878 and 2006.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Using satellites to monitor climate change: Progress and challenges
Many of the early research and meteorological satellites were either not designed for climate-quality measurements, or were not succeeded at the end of their lifetimes. The resulting patchwork of quality data has required extraordinary scientific effort to yield credible climate information.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Penn genetics researcher presents on evolutionary history of modern humans in Africa
Sarah A. Tishkoff, PhD, David and Lyn Silfen University Associate Professor, will present "Evolutionary History of Modern Humans in Africa. In honor of Darwin's 200th birthday on February 12, Tishkoff's talk will focus on the process of evolution due to natural selection using examples from recent human evolution.

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Leading edge facility to strip history bare
A new facility opening later this year at the Diamond synchrotron is set to revolutionize world heritage science. A new research platform soon to be available at the leading UK science facility, Diamond Light Source, will help uncover ancient secrets that have been locked away for centuries. For the first time ever, cultural heritage scientists will be able to scan and image large relics and artifacts up to two tons in weight in incredible precision.

Contact: Sarah Bucknall
sarah.bucknall@diamond.ac.uk
0044-012-357-78639
Diamond Light Source

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Synthetic biology yields clues to evolution and the origin of life
Researchers in the field of synthetic biology are still a long way from being able to assemble living cells from scratch in the laboratory. But according to UC Santa Cruz biochemist David Deamer, their efforts are yielding clues to the mystery of how life began on Earth.
NASA

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Evolution education for K-12 teachers needs beefing up, says CU-Boulder professor
A failure to grasp the fundamentals of biological systems may be leaving K-12 teachers and students vulnerable to claims by intelligent design creationists, new-age homeopaths and other "hucksters," according to a University of Colorado at Boulder biology professor.

Contact: Mike Klymkowsky
Michael.Klymkowsky@colorado.edu
303-919-4874
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Locations of strain, slip identified in major earthquake fault
Deep-sea drilling into one of the most active earthquake zones on the planet is providing the first direct look at the geophysical fault properties underlying some of the world's largest earthquakes and tsunamis.

Contact: Harold Tobin
htobin@wisc.edu
505-550-1026
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stanford: Using synchrotron X-rays to tease the hidden secrets of dinosaurs and old documents
Stanford researchers use powerful X-rays to find elemental traces of dinosaur tissue next to fossilized bones.

Contact: Dan Stober
dstober@stanford.edu
650-721-6965
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Cosmological simulations key to understanding the universe
Tiziana Di Matteo, associate professor of physics at Carnegie Mellon University is harnessing the power of supercomputing to recreate how galaxies are born, how they develop over time and, ultimately, how they collapse.

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-600-0029
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Caltech's Colin Camerer makes a game of economic theory
How game theory and insights from cognitive psychology can shed light on the economic choices people and corporations make will be the focus of a topical lecture presented by California Institute of Technology behavioral economist Colin Camerer at the 2009 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Lori Oliwenstein
lorio@caltech.edu
626-395-3631
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Clemson chemists present revolutionary teaching concepts
Clemson University researchers want to strengthen chemistry skills starting at the molecular level and are introducing revolutionary ways for high school- and college-level educators to do that for students.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Melanie Cooper
cmelani@clemson.edu
864-650-2755
Clemson University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
When fish farms are built along the coast, where does the waste go?
Commercial fish pens are placed in the open waters of oceans and bays with no reliable method of predicting where the waste plume will be carried by winds, currents and tides. This can lead to damage to fragile coastline environments. As state and federal regulators begin to draw up rules for fish pens, Stanford's fluid dynamics modeling system can provide answers.

Contact: Dan Stober, Stanford News Service
dstober@stanford.edu
650-721-6965
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Researchers shed new light on connection between brain and loneliness
Social isolation affects how people behave as well as how their brains operate, a new shows. The research, presented Sunday at a briefing at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, is the first to use fMRI scans to study connections between perceived social isolation (or loneliness) and activity in the brain. Combining fMRI scans with data relevant to social behavior is part of an emerging field examining brain mechanisms.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: William Harms
w-harms@uchicago.edu
773-702-8356
University of Chicago

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientist models the mysterious travels of greenhouse gas
The global travel logs of greenhouse gases are based on atmospheric sampling locations sprinkled over the Earth and short towers that measure the uptake or release of carbon from a small patch of forest. But those measurements don't agree with current computer models of how plants and soils behave. A University of Michigan researcher is developing a unique way to reconcile these crucial data.
NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Sue Nichols
suenic@umich.edu
517-282-1093
University of Michigan

Showing releases 1-25 out of 122.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>