2009 AAAS Annual Meeting -- Advance news and information

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Hyatt Regency
Chicago
Acapulco Room, West Tower

Thursday,
12 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
13 - 15 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Monday,
16 February

7:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 122.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Iowa State researchers talk chemistry education at major science meeting
Two Iowa State chemists recently offered their views for improving science education during the 2009 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Mike Krapfl
mkrapfl@iastate.edu
515-294-4917
Iowa State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Beauty and grooming science evolves
P&G Beauty & Grooming scientists are presenting research at the AAAS Annual Meeting that offers evidence of science's role in evolving beauty and grooming product efficacy. Five studies -- with subjects ranging from color optics to skin aging genomics to razor engineering -- will be on display.

Contact: Lauren Harris
lharris@spectrumscience.com
214-773-6644
Spectrum

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Experts explore 'languages without ancestors' during the 2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
People who are deaf create their own languages in a variety of circumstances, according to experts who will be discussing this phenomenon during the 2009 AAAS Annual Meeting, taking place Feb. 12-16, 2009 in Chicago.

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Deaf children use hands to invent own way of communicating
Deaf children are able to develop a language-like gesture system by making up hand signs and using homemade systems to increase their communication as they grow, just as children with conventional spoken language.

Contact: William Harms
w-harms@uchicago.edu
773-702-8356
University of Chicago

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Execretion analysis aids primate social studies
The arrival of molecular genetic analysis of both genes and hormones is providing scientists unexpected and unprecedented information about animals -- provided the researchers can find ways to get acceptable samples, said Duke University biology professor Susan Alberts.

Contact: Monte Basgall
monte.basgall@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
One of history's biggest biological rescue efforts to save 100,000 crop varieties from extinction
Only two years after launching an ambitious effort to save endangered crop species, the Global Crop Diversity Trust announced today it is on track to save from extinction 100,000 different varieties of food crops from 46 countries, making it one of the largest and most successful biological rescue efforts ever undertaken.
Global Crop Diversity Trust

Contact: Jeff Haskins
jhaskins@burnesscommunications.com
254-729-871-422
Burness Communications

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Teaching science: Is discovery better than telling?
Western Michigan University researchers have discovered that in the academic debate over whether young science students learn more through experimenting or direct instruction, there's little difference. Neither teaching approach provides a significant advantage for middle school science students, according to research by three Western Michigan University faculty who will present their findings at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting Feb. 12-16 in Chicago.

Contact: Dr. William Cobern
bill.cobern@wmich.edu
269-387-5407
Western Michigan University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Study finds recession associated with increases in minority victims of crime
The victimization of both female and male blacks and Latinos increases during or after periods of economic recession, according to a study by researchers Karen Heimer of the University of Iowa and Janet Lauritsen of the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
New monitoring stations detect 'silent earthquakes' in Costa Rica
After installing an extensive network of monitoring stations in Costa Rica, researchers have detected slow slip events (also known as "silent earthquakes") along a major fault zone beneath the Nicoya Peninsula. These findings are helping scientists understand the full spectrum of motions occurring on the fault and may yield new insights into the events that lead to major earthquakes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 15-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Ultracold gas mimics ultrahot plasma
A low density, ultra-cold gas cloud behaves strikingly similar to a dense, very hot plasma. Both are near perfect fluids.

Contact: Monte Basgall
monte.basgall@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Michigan State University prof calls for more metro, regional science councils
If science education is to flourish and if science is to be better understood by the general public, then scientists need to think more locally, Michigan State University professor Jon Miller said. Miller and several other academics spoke at a special symposium -- "C2ST: The Nation's First Metropolitan Science Council" -- today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting.

Contact: Mark Fellows
mark.fellows@ur.msu.edu
517-819-5437
Michigan State University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Internet emerges as social research tool
For the past two decades, the Internet has been used by many as an easy-to-use tool that enables the spread of information globally. Increasingly, the Web is moving beyond its use as an electronic "Yellow Pages" and online messaging platform to a virtual world where social interaction and communities can inform social science and its applications in the real world.

Contact: Mark Fellows
mark.fellows@ur.msu.edu
517-819-5437
Michigan State University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Climate change likely to be more devastating than experts predicted, warns top IPCC scientist
Without decisive action, global warming is likely to accelerate at a much faster pace and cause more environmental damage than predicted, says Stanford scientist Chris Field, a leading member of the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Field warns that higher temperatures could ignite tropical forests and melt the Arctic tundra, releasing billions of tons of greenhouse gas that could raise temperatures even more -- a vicious cycle that could spiral out of control.

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Artificial cells, simple model for complex structure
A simple, chemical materials model may lead to a better understanding of the structure and organization of the cell according to a Penn State researcher.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Panel ponders healthy donuts, education during AAAS nano-biotechnology session
European food companies already use nanotechnology in consumer products, but few voluntarily inform consumers, said Dutch food scientist Frans Kampers of Wageningen University and Research Center Feb. 14 at the AAAS symposium "From Donuts to Drugs: Nano-Biotechnology Evolution or Revolution." "All of us as scientists are being impacted by nano-bioscience and there are many issues. The interdisciplinary aspect is just one of them," said Rod Hill, a University of Idaho professor and symposium organizer.

Contact: Bill Loftus
bloftus@uidaho.edu
208-301-3566
University of Idaho

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Iowa student engineers develop hand-held water sanitizer for a thirsty world
A presentation by University of Iowa faculty member Craig Just on Feb. 14 at the 2009 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago featured the work of 15 College of Engineering students who won a 2008 US EPA award for their project to design a $5, hand-held device to sanitize water in developing countries.
US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
New data suggest 'jumping genes' play a significant role in gene regulatory networks
Research performed at the UC Santa Cruz Center for Biomolecular Science & Engineering suggests that mobile repetitive elements -- also known as transposons or "jumping genes" -- do indeed affect the evolution of gene regulatory networks.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Mary Trigiani
mtrigiani@soe.ucsc.edu
831-459-4495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Exploring planets in distant space and deep interiors
In recent years researchers have found hundreds of new planets beyond our solar system, raising questions about the origins and properties of these exotic worlds -- not to mention the possible presence of life. Speaking at a symposium titled "The Origin and Evolution of Planets" held at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, two Carnegie Institution scientists will present their perspectives on the new era of planetary exploration.

Contact: Alan Boss
boss@dtm.ciw.edu
202-478-8858
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Decisive action needed as warming predictions worsen, says expert
Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere are rising more rapidly than expected, increasing the danger that without aggressive action to reduce emissions the climate system could cross a critical threshold by the end of the century, warns a leading member of the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Studies indicate that greenhouse warming could trigger a vicious cycle of feedback, in which carbon dioxide released from thawing tundra and increasingly fire-prone forests drives global temperatures even higher.

Contact: Chris Field
cfield@ciw.edu
650-462-1047 x201
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Radioimmunotherapy: Promising treatment for HIV infection and viral cancers
Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have piggybacked antibodies onto radioactive payloads to deliver doses of radiation that selectively target and destroy microbial and HIV-infected cells. The experimental treatment -- called radioimmunotherapy, or RIT -- holds promise for treating various infectious diseases, including HIV and cancers caused by viruses.

Contact: Michael Heller
sciencenews@aecom.yu.edu
718-430-4186
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Biofuels boom could fuel rainforest destruction, Stanford researcher warns
Farmers across the tropics might raze forests to plant biofuel crops, according to new research by Holly Gibbs, a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford's Woods Institute for the Environment. "If we run our cars on biofuels produced in the tropics, chances will be good that we are effectively burning rainforests in our gas tanks," she warned.
David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellowship

Contact: Louis Bergeron
louisb3@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mixed population provides insights into human genetic makeup
Genetic diseases and genetically mixed populations can help researchers understand human diversity and human origins according to a Penn State physical anthropologist.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Biologist discusses sacred nature of sustainability
The hot topics of global warming and environmental sustainability are concerns that fit neatly within the precepts of religious naturalism, according to Ursula Goodenough, Ph.D., professor of biology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. In addition to being a renowned cell biologist, Goodenough is a religious naturalist and the author of The Sacred Depths of Nature, a bestselling book on religious naturalism that was published in 1998.

Contact: Ursula Goodenough
goodenough@wustl.edu
314-935-6836
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Surprising results: Virtual games players stick close to home
Northwestern University researchers have analyzed a "gold mine" of networking data from EverQuest II, a fantasy massive multiplayer online role-playing game, along with a survey of 7,000 players. Their findings include that many players underestimate the amount of time they spend playing the games, the number of players who say they are depressed is disproportionately high -- and surprisingly -- most people played with people in their general geographic area.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Molecules self-assemble to provide new therapeutic treatments
By tailoring peptide amphiphiles, small synthetic molecules developed at Northwestern University, and combining them with other molecules, Northwestern researchers can make a wide variety of structures that may provide new treatments for medical issues including spinal cord injuries, diabetes and Parkinson's disease. Combining the PA molecules with hyaluronic acid, a biopolymer found in the human body in places like joints and cartilage, resulted in an instant membrane structure in the form of self-assembling sacs.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Showing releases 26-50 out of 122.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>