2009 AAAS Annual Meeting -- Advance news and information

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Thursday,
12 February

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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 122.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
US petroleum dependency factor of history
When the Drake Oil Well in Titusville, Pennsylvania began seeping crude oil 150 years ago, humanity allowed itself to become engulfed in the ecology of oil, according to a Penn State environmental historian. Now in the midst of an energy transition, the US and the world need to keep moving forward toward alternative methods of power generation.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Cosmologist Paul Davies explores notion of 'alien' life on Earth
Astrobiologists have often pondered "life as we do not know it" in the context of extraterrestrial life, says Paul Davies, an internationally acclaimed theoretical physicist and cosmologist at Arizona State University. But has there been a blind spot to the possibility of "alien" life on Earth? Davies will challenge the orthodox view that there is only one form of life in a lecture titled "Shadow Life: Life As We Don't Yet Know It" at the annual AAAS meeting.

Contact: Carol Hughes
carol.hughes@asu.edu
480-965-6375
Arizona State University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS Annual Meeting experts to explore the origin and evolution of planets
Within the past two decades, scientists have found more than 300 planets around stars beyond the sun -- most of them giant gas or ice planets, some of them possibly rocky giants, or "super-Earths."

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
'Petascale computing' may improve storm predictions, AAAS Annual Meeting speakers report
Scientific computing is rapidly moving to the petascale, a quadrillion arithmetic operations per second, according to speakers at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, scheduled for Feb. 12-16 in Chicago.

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Nanoparticle toxicity doesn't get wacky at the smallest sizes
The smallest nano-sized silica particles used in biomedicine and engineering likely won't cause unexpected biological responses due to their size, according to work presented today. The result should allay fears that cells and tissues will react unpredictably when exposed to the finest silica nanomaterials in industrial or commercial applications. The researchers concluded this by using total surface area as a measure of dose, rather than particle mass or number of particles.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Climate change may alter malaria patterns
Temperature is an important factor in the spread of malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases, but researchers who look at average monthly or annual temperatures are not seeing the whole picture. Global climate change will affect daily temperature variations, which can have a more pronounced effect on parasite development, according to a Penn State entomologist.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Breaking the barrier: Discovery of anti-resistance factors and novel ocean drugs
Investigations into coral disease, red tides and other marine environmental issues have led to discoveries of new chemicals as a source for pharmaceuticals. These chemicals function as antibiotics for microorganism providing survival advantages and may be usable in human health care. We believe that one could apply many of these chemical mechanisms or novel pharmaceuticals to human disease resulting in a number of alternatives to deal with growing antibiotic resistance.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
X-ray eyes bring us closer to early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease
It is estimated that 4 million people world-wide are suffering from Parkinson's, a complex disease that varies greatly among affected individuals. Understanding the brain chemistry that leads to the onset of Parkinson's is vital if we are to develop methods for early MRI diagnosis and new treatments for this devastating disease.

Contact: Sarah Bucknall
sarah.bucknall@diamond.ac.uk
0044-012-357-78639
Diamond Light Source

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Findings raise new questions about evolution of hormones in mammals
The recent developments of noninvasive techniques such as tracking mammals to gather feces, and sensitive assays for fecal hormone metabolites, have allowed the formulation of a more complete picture of the relationships among behavior, social systems and hormone function in mammals in the wild -- sometimes contradicting findings in the lab.

Contact: Michael Bruntz
mbruntz@sfsu.edu
415-338-1743
San Francisco State University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Diamond's latest results mark the first step towards a world reclassification of viruses
Prof. Dave Stuart, Director of Life Sciences at Diamond -- the UK national synchrotron -- and head of the Structural Biology Laboratory at Oxford's Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics will unveil the structure of a biological protein from the vaccinia virus at the prestigious American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago. This is a significant step towards unlocking effective therapies to treat viruses.

Contact: Sarah Bucknall
sarah.bucknall@diamond.ac.uk
44-012-357-78639
Diamond Light Source

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Figuring out green power -- MSU scientists speed up discovery of plant metabolism genes
Michigan State University researchers are dramatically speeding up identification of genes that affect the structure and function of chloroplasts, which could lead to plants tailored specifically for biofuel production or delivering high levels of specific nutrients.

Contact: Mark Fellows
mark.fellows@ur.msu.edu
517-819-5437
Michigan State University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
New resource for teachers, public on how to recognize science when you see it
How does science work? While scientists are often hard put to explain the process, a new resource called "Understanding Science" helps students, teachers and the public decide what is and is not science and understand the messy but fun adventure of science. Funded by NSF and built by UC Berkeley researchers, the Web site corrects the linear, cookbook-like approach commonly taught, instead showing the often circuitous route leading from idea to discovery.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
UK leading the way in corneal research
Extremely intense X-rays from Diamond - the UK's national synchrotron - are helping to advance research into the understanding and treatment of eye diseases. Due to the detailed nature of the experiments, researchers from Cardiff University are making discoveries about the eye that should help to advance laser surgeries such as LASIK and contribute to the eventual development of an artificial cornea.

Contact: Sarah Bucknall
sarah.bucknall@diamond.ac.uk
44-012-357-78639
Diamond Light Source

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Biofuels, like politics, are local
Field work and computer simulations in Michigan and Wisconsin are helping biofuels researchers understand the basics of getting home-grown energy from the field to consumers. Preliminary results presented today from the US Department of Energy's Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center suggest that incorporating native, perennial plants during biofuels production reduces emissions of greenhouse gases, improves water quality and enhances biodiversity. The results are part of an experimental effort to make biofuels economically and environmentally sustainable.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Dealing with taxonomic uncertainty for threatened and endangered species
As part of a symposium on "Defining species for threatened and endangered protection" Barbara Taylor, Ph.D., NOAA Fisheries Service, will discuss the need to explicitly consider uncertainty in taxonomy in conservation decisions. Species concepts continue to be a contentious, but largely philosophical debate among academic biologists. How differences between groups of organisms are identified, however, can have real, on-the-ground policy implications for which species receive legal protection under the federal Endangered Species Act.
NOAA

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Swimmers at public beaches show increased risk of exposure to contagious staph bacteria
University of Miami's Oceans and Human Health Center along with Florida DOH, CDC and EPA jointly sponsor a first-ever epidemiological study of sub-tropical ocean beaches and present preliminary findings at the AAAS meeting in Chicago. Swimmers at public beaches show increased risk of exposure to contagious staph bacteria.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Miami, Florida Department of Health & Environmental Protection, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Barbra Gonzalez
barbgo@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Engineers create intelligent molecules that seek-and-destroy diseased cells
Current treatments for diseases like cancer typically destroy nasty malignant cells, while also hammering the healthy ones. Using new advances in synthetic biology, researchers are designing molecules intelligent enough to recognize diseased cells, leaving the healthy cells alone. "We basically design molecules that actually go into the cell and do an analysis of the cellular state before delivering the therapeutic punch," said Christina Smolke, assistant professor of bioengineering who joined Stanford University in January.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Department of Defense and the Beckman Foundation.

Contact: Louis Bergeron
louisb3@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
What biology and evolution can teach us about our safety: A tribute to Darwin
What do biology and evolution teach us about our own security? In a symposium Feb. 13 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago, paying tribute to Charles Darwin, UCLA behavioral ecologist Daniel T. Blumstein, shares lessons and insights from Darwin that can be applied to our own safety.

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
The science suggests access to nature is essential to human health
Considerable research supports the idea that nature is essential to the physical, psychological and social well-being of the human animal.

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
When it comes to elephant love calls, the answer lies in a bone-shaking triangle
Caitlin O'Connell-Rodwell, an ecologist and consulting assistant professor in otolaryngology at Stanford University School of Medicine, has been studying elephant communication for more than 15 years. During that time she's puzzled over which or their two seismic sensing systems -- either bone conduction or somatosensory reception -- elephants use most often in locating the source of a call. In her most recent field season last summer, she finally got an answer.

Contact: Louis Bergeron
louisb3@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mass media often failing in its coverage of global warming, says climate researcher
"Business managers of media organizations, you are screwing up your responsibility by firing science and environment reporters who are frankly the only ones competent to do this," said climate researcher and policy analyst Stephen Schneider, in assessing the current state of media coverage of global warming and related issues. Schneider is a coordinating lead author of chapter 19 in the report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change published in 2007.

Contact: Louis Bergeron
louisb3@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Tracking the digital traces of social networks
Northwestern University researchers have studied the massive online virtual world Second Life to test whether or not certain social theories are true. Having access to huge amounts of data gave them a way to answer how networks are created. Searching through anonymized data from Teen Grid, where only teenage players can socialize, the researchers found that teens' online friendships were disproportionately with people in their immediate geographic area -- likely with people they already knew.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Antibiotic resistance: A rising concern in marine ecosystems
A team of scientists, speaking today at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, called for new awareness of the potential for antibiotic-resistant illnesses from the marine environment, and pointed to the marine realm as a source for possible cures of those threats.

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
202-253-5256
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS Symposium: Emerging threats to tropical, temperate and ocean ecosystems
Three conservation scientists describe new threats and research needs for tropical, temperate and ocean ecosystems.

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
202-503-6010
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Seeing the forest and the trees helps cut atmospheric carbon dioxide
Putting a price tag on carbon dioxide emitted by different land use practices could dramatically change the way that land is used, according to research presented today at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting. When all carbon emissions -- fossil fuel, industrial and land-use change emissions -- are included in a global management plan, deforestation slows and could reverse, managers place limits on the expansion of biofuels production, and emission control becomes cheaper.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing releases 51-75 out of 122.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>