2009 AAAS Annual Meeting -- Advance news and information

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Hyatt Regency
Chicago
Acapulco Room, West Tower

Thursday,
12 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
13 - 15 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Monday,
16 February

7:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

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2009 Highlights

AAAS Annual Meeting Main Page

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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 122.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Animals successfully relearn smell of kin after hibernation
Animals can re-establish their use of smell to detect siblings, even following an interruption such as prolonged hibernation. Smell is an important animal survival tool. Female ground squirrel sisters bond for protection and use smell to recognize each other. Animals also need to recognize siblings to avoid inbreeding, which would have a negative effect on their genetic fitness. The research on how animals recognize kin is vital to helping plan conservation programs for endangered species.

Contact: William Harms
w-harms@uchicago.edu
773-702-8356
University of Chicago

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS Annual Meeting speakers report some success stories from marine science
Doom and gloom has become such a standard refrain when discussing the state of ocean ecosystems that it is easy to forget that some real progress is being made, says Jeremy B. C. Jackson of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California.

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Duke ecologist preaches 'natural' security for homeland defense
Global society is undergoing rapid political and socioeconomic changes, to which our security measures must adapt. Fortunately, we're surrounded by millions of examples of security measures from nature that do just that.

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Poly wants a pigment
"What you see is what you get" often is the mantra in the highly competitive life of birds, as they use brilliant displays of color to woo females for mating. Now researchers are finding that carotenoids -- the compounds responsible for amping up red, orange and yellow colors of birds -- also may play a role in color perception and in a bird's ability to reproduce, making it a cornerstone in birds' vitality.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Are people smarter than pigeons? AAAS Annual Meeting speakers report on animals with 'social smarts'
Emerging evolutionary studies are revealing that animals have "social smarts," too, with a range of behaviors that can enhance species survival, according to speakers at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, set for Feb. 12-16, 2009 in Chicago.

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Arizona environmental economist says invasive species is part of the price of doing business
When the sun rides low on the horizon and winter chills wrap us all in down and fleece, global trade brings blueberries from South America, oranges from Israel. But trade in exotic goods also comes with significant local economic costs, explains Charles Perrings, professor of environmental economics at Arizona State University.

Contact: Margaret Coulombe
margaret.coulombe@asu.edu
480-727-8934
Arizona State University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
African initiative trains students, explores geophysical mysteries
Earthquakes, volcanoes and the African superplume are only some of the phenomena under investigation through AfricaArray, a program that establishes geophysical observatories, trains African and American students and examines geophysical phenomena on the African continent.
National Science Foundation, National Research Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Pre-verbal number sense common to monkeys, babies, college kids
Elizabeth Brannon, an assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University, studies how human adults and infants, lemurs, and monkeys think about numbers without using language. She's looking for the brain systems that support number sense and trying to figure out how this cognitive skill develops.

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Evolutionary link to modern-day obesity, other problems
That irresistible urge for a cheeseburger has its roots in dramatic environmental changes that occurred some 2 million years ago. Higher quality, nutritionally dense diets became necessary to fuel high-energy demands of humans' exceptionally large brains and for developing the first rudimentary hunting and gathering economy. Today, the imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure is the root cause of obesity in the industrialized world, according to Northwestern University anthropologist William Leonard.

Contact: Pat Vaughan Tremmel
p-tremmel@northwestern.edu
847-491-4892
Northwestern University

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
ASU genetics research sheds light on evolution of the human diet
Diet -- and how it has shaped our genome -- occupies much of an evolutionary scientist's time. Anne Stone, associate professor of anthropology in Arizona State University's School of Human Evolution and Social Change, will discuss how diet holds keys to understanding who we are, how we live and form societies, and how we evolved from hunter-gatherers to agriculturists, all the way to modern urban dwellers, at the AAAS annual meeting.

Contact: Jodi Guyot
Jodi.Guyot@asu.edu
480-727-8739
Arizona State University

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Behavioral studies show baboons and pigeons are capable of higher-level cognition
It's safe to say that humans are smarter than animals, but a University of Iowa researcher is investigating the extent of that disparity in intelligence. And, it may not be as great a gap as you suspect, according to UI psychologist Ed Wasserman, who presents his findings at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting today in Chicago.

Contact: Nicole Riehl
nicole-riehl@uiowa.edu
319-384-0070
University of Iowa

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Changing ocean conditions turning penguins into long-distance commuters
Magellanic penguins, like most other species of the flightless birds, are having their survival challenged by wide variability in conditions and food availability, a University of Washington biologist has found.
Wildlife Conservation Society

Contact: Vince Stricherz
vinces@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Fish and Fisheries
US Atlantic cod population to drop by half by 2050
A University of British Columbia researcher put a number to the impact of climate change on world fisheries at today's Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago.

Contact: Brian Lin
brian.lin@ubc.ca
604-818-5685
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS Annual Meeting news: Dining habits of early humans
With obesity on the rise and popular diet gurus claiming to understand the dining preferences of prehistoric people, speakers at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science will attempt to help sort fact from fiction -- or at least identify areas of scientific uncertainty.

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Children's early gesture have important link to school preparedness
Children who convey more meanings with gestures at age 14 months have much larger vocabularies at 54 months than children who convey fewer meanings and are accordingly better prepared for school, according to research to be published in the journal Science on Friday, Feb. 13. The research showed that the differences particularly favored children from higher-income families with well-educated parents and may help explain the disadvantages some children from low-income families face upon entering school.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: William Harms
w-harms@uchicago.edu
773-702-8356
University of Chicago

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Draft version of the Neanderthal genome completed
The Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, in Leipzig, Germany, and the 454 Life Sciences Corp., in Branford, Conn., will announce on Feb. 12 during the 2009 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and at a simultaneous European press briefing that they have completed a first draft version of the Neanderthal genome.
Max Planck Society

Contact: Sandra Jacob
49-341-355-0119
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Astronomers unveiling life's cosmic origins
The foundations for life on Earth were laid by the processes of star and planet formation, and the production of complex, prebiotic molecules in interstellar space. Those processes are yielding their secrets to astronomers with powerful research tools and better tools are on the way.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dave Finley
dfinley@nrao.edu
575-835-7302
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS plenary: Intrepid explorers and the search for the origin of species
Evolution, we know, is the guiding thread of biology and explains life as we know it. But how that big idea was inspired and expanded over two centuries of natural history is really a tale of the adventures of a handful of intrepid scientists whose derring-do, perseverance and intellectual curiosity sparked a revolution that forever changed our view of the living world.

Contact: Terry Devitt
trdevitt@wisc.edu
608-219-4575
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Penguins marching into trouble
A combination of changing weather patterns, overfishing, pollution, and other factors have conspired to drive penguin populations into a precipitous decline, according to long-term research funded by the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Contact: Stephen Sautner
ssautner@wcs.org
718-220-3682
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
NSERC at 2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada is pleased to feature Canadian science and engineering research excellence during the American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting from Feb. 12-16, 2009, in Chicago.

Contact: Shannon Cobb
shannon.cobb@nserc-crsng.gc.ca
613-992-8192
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
High-tech tests allow anthropologists to track ancient hominids across the landscape
Dazzling new scientific techniques are allowing archaeologists to track the movements and menus of extinct hominids through the seasons and years as they ate their way across the African landscape, helping to illuminate the evolution of human diets.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Sponheimer
msponheimer@gmail.com
303-898-5307
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 12-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Fish and Fisheries
New findings on climate change and fisheries
Scientists have for the first time calculated the likely impact of climate change on the distribution of more than 1,000 species of fish around the globe.
Pew charitable trust

Contact: Simon Dunford
s.dunford@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92203
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 9-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Fermilab scientists speak on Project X, Higgs race and dark matter search at AAAS
Scientists working at the Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory will present talks on plans for the proposed Project X accelerator at Fermilab; the latest Higgs search results from the Tevatron collider experiments; and an update on the search for dark matter using a bubble chamber. The talks will take place Feb. 12-16 in Chicago at the annual conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science at the Hyatt Regency Hotel.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-531-8071
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Award Announcement

Public Release: 16-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Case Western Reserve physics chair named APS Fellow, AAAS speaker
Dan Akerib, chair of the Case Western Reserve University department of physics, has been elected a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) in honor of his work in the area of astrophysics. He also will speak at the annual conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago on Monday, Feb. 16.

Contact: Jason A. Tirotta
jason.tirotta@case.edu
216-368-6890
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2009
2009 AAAS Annual Meeting
Male fertility expert Marvin Meistrich elected AAAS Fellow
Illuminating the molecular details of normal sperm development, demonstrating how chemotherapy or radiation can leave a man or boy sterile, and pursuing ways to restore fertility have earned a major honor for a scientist at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

Contact: Scott Merville
smerville@mdanderson.org
713-792-0661
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Showing releases 76-100 out of 122.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>