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AAAS Annual Meeting General Information

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Newsroom HQ:
San Diego Convention Center
Room 15B

Thursday,
18 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
19 - 21 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Monday,
22 February

7:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 87.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 24-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
OSA, APS highlight history and future of laser technology at 2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
As part of LaserFest, the yearlong celebration of the 50th anniversary of the first working laser, the Optical Society and the American Physical Society sponsored a special daylong seminar on the birth, growth and future developments in laser science and technology at the 2010 American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting. The seminar, titled "The History and Future of Laser Technology," took place Sunday, Feb. 21, in San Diego.

Contact: Angela Stark
astark@osa.org
202-416-1443
The Optical Society

Public Release: 22-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
CU-Boulder prof speaks on mass media role in climate change skepticism
Mass media have been a key vehicle by which climate change contrarianism has traveled, according to Maxwell Boykoff, a University of Colorado at Boulder professor and fellow of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, or CIRES.

Contact: Maxwell Boykoff
Boykoff@Colorado.edu
303-735-6316
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
The geography of violence
Douglas J. Wiebe, Ph.D., assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine will present portions of an ongoing study about the daily activities of youth and their risk of being violently injured.

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-459-0544
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
The role of sleep in brain development
Marcos Frank, Ph.D., associate professor of Neuroscience at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, will present information on early brain development and the importance of sleep during early life when the brain is rapidly maturing and highly changeable.

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-459-0544
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Genetic health risks in children of assisted reproductive technology
As a group, children born as a result of assisted reproductive technology are at greater risk of certain kinds of birth defects and being low birth weight.

Contact: Carmen Sapienza
sapienza@temple.edu
215-805-2853
Temple University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Biologists use mathematics to advance our understanding of health and disease
Math-based computer models are a powerful tool for discovering the details of complex living systems. John Tyson, professor of biology at Virginia Tech, is creating such models to discover how cells process information and make decisions.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Susan Trulove
strulove@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Cultural history colors thought about bioethics, evolution
Popularized ideas about evolution assume that some human groups are more evolved than other human groups. These cultural views of evolution can have important ethical implications, says a Duke University expert on theological and biomedical ethics.

Contact: Andrea Fereshteh
andrea.fereshteh@duke.edu
919-681-8055
Duke University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Where will the next food crisis strike and how to face it?
Satellite observation is the key instrument that will allow to double in 2010 the number of countries monitored in real time for detecting first indications of adverse agricultural outcomes. The new Integrated Phase Classification system facilitates and accelerates the reaction time to food security crises by allowing a common and internationally recognized classification of their severity.

Contact: Elena González Verdesoto
elena.gonzalez-verdesoto@ec.europa.eu
32-498-986-482
European Commission Joint Research Centre

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Marine reserves hit the spotlight in PNAS special issue, AAAS press briefing
Marine reserves are known to be effective conservation tools when they are placed and designed properly. This week, a special issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is dedicated to the latest science on marine reserves, with a focus on where and how reserves can most effectively help to meet both conservation and fisheries goals.

Contact: Gail Gallessich
gail.g@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
A midday nap markedly boosts the brain's learning capacity
If you see a student dozing in the library or a co-worker catching 40 winks in her cubicle, don't roll your eyes. New research from the University of California, Berkeley, shows that an hour's nap can dramatically boost and restore your brain power. Indeed, the findings suggest that a biphasic sleep schedule not only refreshes the mind, but can make you smarter.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Yasmin Anwar
yanwar@berkeley.edu
510-643-7944
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
More alcohol sales sites mean more neighborhood violence, new Indiana University research finds
More alcohol sales sites in a neighborhood equates to more violence, and the highest assault rates are associated with carry-out sites selling alcohol for off-premise consumption, according to new research released today (Feb. 21) by two Indiana University professors.

Contact: Steve Chaplin
stjchap@indiana.edu
812-856-1896
Indiana University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Arizona State epidemiologist to explore dynamics of Mexico's H1N1 pandemic
Influenza surveillance mechanisms in Mexico were adequate during the fast-spreading H1N1 outbreak in 2009, yet Mexico did not have the infrastructure to quickly identify the emergence of this novel strain, according to Arizona State University epidemiologist Carlos Castillo-Chavez, director of ASU's Mathematical, Computational and Modeling Sciences Center.

Contact: Carol Hughes
carol.hughes@asu.edu
480-965-6375
Arizona State University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Will coral reefs disappear?
NSERC-funded researcher Dr. Simon Donner, an assistant professor in the department of geography at the University of British Columbia, will be talking about the vulnerability of coral reefs to climate change due to higher ocean temperatures.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Simon Donner
simon.donner@geog.ubc.ca
604-561-7284
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Word learning in deaf children with cochlear implants
Indiana University School of Medicine researcher reports at 2010 AAAS meeting that deaf children's word-learning skill was strongly affected by early auditory experience, whether that experience was through normal means or with a cochlear implant. Children who received implant by age 13 months performed similarly to normal-hearing counterparts while children who received a cochlear implant later performed, on average, more poorly than their normal-hearing peers.
NIH/National Institute for Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Deafness Research Foundation

Contact: Mary L. Hardin
mhardin@iupui.edu
317-274-7722
Indiana University School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Biotech, nanotech and synthetic biology roles in future food supply explored
Some say the world's population will swell to 9 billion people by 2030, presenting significant challenges for agriculture to provide enough food to meet demand, says University of Idaho animal scientist Rod Hill. Hill and Larry Branen, a University of Idaho food scientist, organized a symposium during the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting Sunday to explore ways biotechnology could provide healthy and plentiful animal-based foods to meet future demands.

Contact: Bill Loftus
bloftus@uidaho.edu
208-301-3566
University of Idaho

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
New insights into helping marine species cope with climate change
Marine reserves are increasingly important for species that are being forced by climate change to move to a new home, adapt to new conditions or die. Stanford biologist Steve Palumbi compares the relative benefits of large and small protected areas in perpetuating populations. He also has found a coral species that has developed the "skills" to cope with rising temperatures.

Contact: Louis Bergeron
louisb3@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
World-class protection boosts Australia's Great Barrier Reef
Australia's Great Barrier Reef is showing an extraordinary range of benefits from the network of protected marine reserves introduced there five years ago, according to a comprehensive new study published in PNAS. "Our data show rapid increases of fish inside no-take reserves, in both reef and non-reef habitats ," says Professor Terry Hughes speaking at the AAAS meeting, San Diego. "Critically, the reserves also benefit overall ecosystem health and resilience," says author Dr Laurence McCook.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Laurence McCook
l.mccook@gbrmpa.gov.au
61-074-750-0787
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Participation 'important for healthy marine parks'
The involvement of locals is a key ingredient in the success of marine parks which protect coral reefs and fish stocks. The largest-scale study to date of how coastal communities influence successful outcomes in marine reserves has found that human population pressure was a critical factor in whether or not a reserve succeeded in protecting marine resources -- but so too was local involvement in research and management.
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

Contact: Dr. Joshua Cinner
Joshua.Cinner@jcu.edu.au
805-452-3625
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
ASU researcher outlines strategies to curb urban heat island
Protect yourself from the summer sun is good advice to children who want to play outside on a hot summer day and it is good advice to cities as a way to mitigate the phenomenon known as urban heat island, said Harvey Bryan, an ASU professor of architecture.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Call made for better metrics for energy savings
A Michigan State University professor says if the world is to make better decisions when it comes to developing new energy sources, it needs to have better methods of measuring progress toward its energy goals.

Contact: Tom Oswald
tom.oswald@ur.msu.edu
517-281-7129
Michigan State University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Governments 'misjudging' scale of CO2 emissions
Policymakers are markedly underestimating the changes needed to mitigate CO2 emission required to prevent dangerous climate change because they work in "silos." Dr. Sebastian Carney, from the University of Manchester, discovered that the lack of communication between government departments, NGOs and other authorities has resulted in significant differences over who is responsible for what. He will describe his work at the 2010 AAAS Annual Meeting.

Contact: Mike Addelman
44-161-275-0790
University of Manchester

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Damage to threatened Gulf of California habitats can be reversed
Once described by Jacques Cousteau as the "world's aquarium," the marine ecosystems of the Gulf of California are under threat. Destructive new fishing methods are depleting the sea's habitats, creating areas that are ghosts of their former existences.

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Babies and sleep: Another reason to love naps
UA psychologists have found that infants need adequate sleep, including regular naps, in order to effectively learn about the new world they live in.

Contact: Lynn Nadel
nadel@email.arizona.edu
520-621-7449
University of Arizona

Public Release: 21-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
CU physicists use ultra-fast lasers to open doors to new technologies unheard of just years ago
For nearly half a century, scientists have been trying to figure out how to build a cost-effective and reasonably sized X-ray laser that could, among other things, provide super high-resolution imaging. And for the past two decades, University of Colorado at Boulder physics professors Margaret Murnane and Henry Kapteyn have been inching closer to that goal.

Contact: Margaret Murnane
murnane@jila.colorado.edu
303-492-7839
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 20-Feb-2010
2010 AAAS Annual Meeting
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Can math and science help solve crimes?
UCLA scientists working with the Los Angeles Police Department to analyze crime patterns report that criminal "hotspots" come in at least two different types -- one of which can be suppressed by police. They believe their findings apply to cities worldwide.

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Showing releases 1-25 out of 87.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>