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AAAS Annual Meeting General Information

Contact AAAS Meetings Staff

Newsroom HQ:
Washington Convention Center
Room 204A

Thursday,
17 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
18 - 20 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Monday,
21 February

7:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

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2010 Highlights

EurekAlert!

AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 94.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 1-Mar-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Berkeley scientists highlight challenges of meeting state energy goals by 2050
Energy efficiency, electrification and low carbon fuels are essential for California to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent below 1990 levels by the year 2050. While the challenges are great, they can be met, say Berkeley Lab scientists.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
New free, hands-on tool supports sustainable living choices
People who want to eat healthy and live sustainably have a new way to measure their impact on the environment: a Web-based tool that calculates an individual's "nitrogen footprint." The calculator is a project of the International Nitrogen Initiative, a global network of scientists who share research and data on the nitrogen dilemma.

Contact: Fariss Samarrai
fls4f@virginia.edu
434-924-3778
University of Virginia

Public Release: 21-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Sustainability solutions need the power of networks
The choices an individual makes about environmental issues are affected by family, friends and others in a person's social network. Michigan State University scientists are studying how to harness the power of social networks to better communicate sustainability science.

Contact: Jamie DePolo
depolo@msu.edu
609-354-8403
Michigan State University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS news briefs from UC Davis
UC Davis will present at AAAS this week on these topics: Greenhouse gases in fuels; predatory arms races; agricultural nitrogen; celestial superconductors; ocean invaders; making energy from manure; mosquito repellents.

Contact: Sylvia Wright
swright@ucdavis.edu
530-752-7704
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 21-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Plenary speech by HHMI professor highlights efforts of scientist-educators
HHMI professor Graham Walker will talk about running a science education research group and developing resources for MIT and the larger education community in a AAAS plenary talk.

Contact: Andrea Widener
widenera@hhmi.org
301-215-8807
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Public Release: 21-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Climate change affecting food safety
Climate change is already having an effect on the safety of the world's food supplies and unless action is taken it's only going to get worse, a Michigan State University professor told a symposium at this year's meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Tom Oswald
tom.oswald@ur.msu.edu
517-281-7129
Michigan State University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Antifungal compound found on tropical seaweed has promising antimalarial properties
A group of chemical compounds used by a species of tropical seaweed to ward off fungus attacks may have promising antimalarial properties for humans. The compounds are part of a unique chemical signaling system that seaweeds use to battle enemies -- and that may provide a wealth of potential new pharmaceutical compounds.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
How to leave your body
Leave your body and shake hands with yourself, gain an extra limb or change into a robot for a while. Swedish neuroscientist Henrik Ehrsson has demonstrated that the brain's image of the body is negotiable. Applications stretch from touch-sensitive prostheses to robotics and virtual worlds.

Contact: Sabina Bossi
sabina.bossi@ki.se
46-706-146-066
Karolinska Institutet

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Look after your brain
As the average life span becomes longer, dementia becomes more common. Swedish scientist Laura Fratiglioni has shown that everyone can minimize his or her risk of being affected. Factors from blood pressure and weight to the degree of physical and mental activity can influence cognitive functioning as one gets older.

Contact: Sabina Bossi
sabina.bossi@ki.se
46-706-146-066
Karolinska Institutet

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
One Health: From ideas to implementation, rhetoric to reality
The convergence of people, animals, and our environment has created a new dynamic in which the health of each group is inextricably and globally interconnected, without borders. It is against this background that One Health has emerged as a multidisciplinary effort to attain optimal health of humans, animals and our environment.

Contact: Barbara Hyde
bhyde@asmusa.org
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
New assessment of black carbon and tropospheric ozone's role in climate change
The Integrated Assessment of Black Carbon and Tropospheric Ozone, supported by UNEP and the World Meteorological Organization, brought together more than 70 experts to assess the state of science and existing policy options for addressing these pollutants. Among other conclusions, it was highlighted that specific measures could already have a positive impact on climate protection and public health. These measures do not replace those related to carbon dioxide, and their full implementation could reduce global warming by 0.5 degrees C.

Contact: Elena Gonzalez Verdesoto
elena.gonzalez-verdesoto@ec.europa.eu
0032-498-986-482
European Commission Joint Research Centre

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Journal of Abnormal Psychology
Research examines callous-unemotional traits, conduct problems in children
Research presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science highlights the importance of callous-unemotional traits in identifying children at risk of antisocial behavior and other adjustment problems.

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@indiana.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Better mapping of human settlements to support crisis management operations
The Global Human Settlements Layer, developed by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre, will soon provide this detailed information for the first time on a global scale. The breakthrough is new advanced algorithms, developed by the JRC, that allow automatic analysis of medium resolution data provided by European satellites.

Contact: Elena Gonzalez Verdesoto
elena.gonzalez-verdesoto@ec.europa.eu
32-498-986-482
European Commission Joint Research Centre

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
How many will we be? Are population estimates off the mark?
In 2011 the Earth's population will reach 7 billion. The UN reports that the total number of people will climb to 9 billion in 2050, peak at 9.5 billion, stabilize temporarily, and then decline. Despite the confidence with which these projections are presented, the Population Council's John Bongaarts says that the trajectory is highly uncertain. If we make larger investments in family planning now, the population could be closer to 8 billion.
Population Council

Contact: Diane Rubino
212-339-0617
Population Council

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Too hot, too cold, just right: Testing the limits of where humans can live
On an isolated segment of islands in the Pacific Ring of Fire, residents endure volcanoes, tsunamis, dense fog, steep cliffs and long and chilly winters. Ben Fitzhugh, from the University of Washington, studies the history of human settlement on the Kuril Islands. Understanding how residents survived the islands' severe environment could inform how we adapt to modern vulnerabilities, including climate change. The findings also have implications for how we rebound from contemporary catastrophes.
National Science Foundation, University of Washington, Russian Academy of Sciences, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

Contact: Molly McElroy
mollywmc@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Arizona State University archaeologist models past and future landscapes
Arizona State University archaeologist C. Michael Barton says it takes a revolution in thought, along with the newest methods of modeling, to produce a comprehensive picture of the past that can help inform land-use decisions for our future. He will speak on "Looking for the Future in the Past: Long-Term Change in Socioecological Systems" at the AAAS annual meeting on Feb. 20.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Carol Hughes
carol.hughes@asu.edu
480-965-6375
Arizona State University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Water, water, everywhere... but is it safe to drink?
Barbara Sherwood Lollar is taking part in the THINK CANADA Press Breakfast Sunday at AAAS. Her research examines society's efforts to reverse and stop groundwater pollution, and the effectiveness of bioremediation technologies—using microbes to clean up organic contaminants such as petroleum hydrocarbons (oil, gasoline or diesel) or chemicals used in the electronics or transportation industries.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Michael Adams
michael.adams@sshrc-crsh.gc.ca
613-219-7523
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
How we manage water resources has a direct impact on our health, says Canada Research Chair
For Margot Parkes, Canada Research Chair in Health, Ecosystems and Society at the University of Northern British Columbia, watersheds are living systems that are essential for healthy communities.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Contact: Michael Adams
michael.adams@sshrc-crsh.gc.ca
613-219-7523
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Arizona State University geographer calls for complexity in sustainability science models
Tropical deforestation is intimately linked with urban dynamics and needs to be considered along with the role and effect of national and regional policies on land use decisions, and the dynamics of economic globalization in the next generation of sustainability science research, according to Arizona State University geographer B.L. Turner II, speaking at the AAAS annual meeting.

Contact: Carol Hughes
carol.hughes@asu.edu
480-965-6375
Arizona State University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
It's time to take a unified approach toward measuring sustainability
Ask any political leader if they are in favor of sustainability, and the pat answer is typically a resounding, "Yes." Evaluating its effectiveness, however, is a much trickier endeavor. Thomas Dietz, a sociology and environmental science and policy professor at Michigan State University, took steps to indentify a universal framework to evaluate sustainability at a national gathering of scientists Feb. 20.

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@ur.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stanford researchers develop new technology for cheaper, more efficient solar cells
Applying an organic layer less than a nanometer thick improves the efficiency of certain solar cells three-fold. The technology could lead to cheaper, more efficient solar panels.

Contact: Louis Bergeron
louisb3@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Spent nuclear fuel is anything but waste
Failure to pursue a program for recycling spent nuclear fuel has put the US far behind other countries and represents a missed opportunity to enhance the nation's energy security and influence other countries, the former chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Sunday.

Contact: Gary Rasp
grasp@energy.utexas.edu
512-585-2084
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Family planning programs have success in developing countries, but need to be expanded
While many researchers generally credit the desire for smaller families for the decline in fertility rates in developing, low-income countries, new research suggests that prevention of unwanted births may actually be a larger factor. The advent of safe and more effective birth control means that people have better control of when and if they have children, said John Casterline, director of the Initiative in Population Research at Ohio State University.

Contact: John Casterline
Casterline.10@sociology.osu.edu
614-247-2519
Ohio State University

Public Release: 20-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Is the link between poverty and water-related disease making rich people sick?
Vanier Canada Graduate Scholar Kate Mulligan presents her research on the connection between cities, water and health at the THINK CANADA Press Breakfast at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference. Her research examines why dengue fever, a severe flu-like illness spread through the bite of mosquitoes, continues to threaten urban populations in many developing countries.
Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship Program

Contact: Michael Adams
michael.adams@sshrc-crsh.gc.ca
613-219-7523
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 19-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Chemical Geology
The world’s oldest water?
New evidence bolsters the notion that deep saline groundwaters in South Africa's Witwatersrand Basin may have remained isolated for many thousands, perhaps even millions, of years. The study, recently accepted for publication in Chemical Geology, found the noble gas neon dissolved in water in three-kilometre deep crevices.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Barbara Sherwood Lollar
bslollar@chem.utoronto.ca
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Showing releases 1-25 out of 94.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>