EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
24-Oct-2014 08:52
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

AAAS Annual Meeting General Information

Contact AAAS Meetings Staff

Newsroom HQ:
Washington Convention Center
Room 204A

Thursday,
17 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
18 - 20 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Monday,
21 February

7:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

All times are US Eastern Standard Time (EST)

Accessibility Option On

Links

Newsroom Main

Newsroom Information

Webcasts
 •  Watch live press briefings
 • 

View schedule

Speaker Interviews
Listen to/view extended interviews with meeting speakers

Press Program
Download Preliminary Press Program (PDF)

Family Science Days
Download stage presentation schedule

Program

Hotel Information

Credentialing

Special Events

Science Journalism Awards

Contact Press Staff

2010 Highlights

EurekAlert!

AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 94.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 19-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mimicking photosynthesis path to solar-derived hydrogen fuel
Inexpensive hydrogen for automotive or jet fuel may be possible by mimicking photosynthesis, according to a Penn State materials chemist, but a number of problems need to be solved first.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 19-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Turning to nature for inspiration
Northwestern University's Chang Liu is using insights from nature as inspiration for both touch and flow sensors -- areas that currently lack good sensors for recording and communicating the senses.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Enhancing nuclear security: Training and international collaboration
While a world free of nuclear weapons remains a goal for governments around the world, nuclear security constitutes a major challenge for the 21st century, as recognized at the 2010 nuclear security summit in Washington. Citizens are generally aware of international efforts to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons, but they are often unaware of nuclear security research and the important role science in this field. A new European nuclear security training center and enhanced international collaboration are good examples.

Contact: Elena Gonzalez Verdesoto
elena.gonzalez-verdesoto@ec.europa.eu
32-498-986-482
European Commission Joint Research Centre

Public Release: 19-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Climate projections show human health impacts possible within 30 years
A panel of scientists speaking today at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) unveiled new research and models demonstrating how climate change could increase exposure and risk of human illness originating from ocean, coastal and Great Lakes ecosystems, with some studies projecting impacts to be felt within 30 years.

Contact: John Ewald
john.ewald@noaa.gov
240-429-6127
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 19-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
A new high-resolution method for imaging below the skin using a liquid lens
University of Rochester optics professor Jannick Rolland has developed an optical technology that provides unprecedented images under the skin's surface. The aim of the technology is to detect and examine skin lesions to determine whether they are benign or cancerous without having to cut the suspected tumor out of the skin and analyze it in the lab.

Contact: Alan Blank
alan.blank@rochester.edu
585-275-2671
University of Rochester

Public Release: 19-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS Symposium: New research facilitates scientific knowledge transfer
A defining feature of a scientific discovery is replication by others. In today's age of computational science, this means higher standards of communication of discoveries -- making available the data that generated the results along with the published research paper. Doing this makes the technology behind the finding widely accessible, facilitating re-use and verification of results.

Contact: Beth Kwon
beth.kwon@columbia.edu
212-854-6581
Columbia University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
'Universal standards' for research integrity may have unintended consequences
The global scientific community is capable of policing its own behavior and should resist creation of a central oversight body to enforce "universal standards" that may have unintended consequences, a renowned physicist and director of the Energy Institute at the University of Texas at Austin said Saturday.

Contact: Gary Rasp
grasp@energy.utexas.edu
512-585-2084
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 19-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Tip sheet: Caltech researchers presenting at AAAS
At this year's American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Washington, D.C., Feb. 17-21, Caltech researchers will present topics ranging from solar and renewable energy solutions to the latest advancements in bioengineering. Caltech's Alice S. Huang, AAAS president, will deliver the President's Address at the opening ceremony, highlighting this year's AAAS theme, "Science Without Borders."

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 19-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Super-sharp radio 'eye' remeasuring the universe
New observations with the Very Long Baseline Array have made the farthest direct distance measurement ever, a key step toward understanding the mysterious Dark Energy that constitutes some 70 percent of the Universe. Other observations are redrawing the map of our home Galaxy and promise to revise our understanding of extrasolar planets.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dave Finley
dfinley@nrao.edu
575-835-7302
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Public Release: 19-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Plants that can move inspire new adaptive structures
The Mimosa plant, which folds its leaves when they're touched, is inspiring a new class of adaptive structures designed to twist, bend, stiffen and even heal themselves. University of Michigan researchers are leading their development.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 19-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
When fingers start tapping, the music must be striking a chord
According to University of Toronto psychologist Luc De Nil the beat could be revealing much more, for example how children master one of the most complex tasks of all -- speech. "The rapid and precise muscle movements of speech must be the most intricate, yet poorly understood, of all the sensory-motor skills," says De Nil.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Contact: Arnet Sheppard
arnet.sheppard@nserc-crsng.gc.ca
613-293-3502
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Europe attracts American researchers
One of the goals of the European Research Council, ERC, is to bring the world's leading researchers to work in Europe. American Juleen Zierath is one of those who have received funds from the ERC. She found the best environment for her research at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.

Contact: Sabina Bossi
sabina.bossi@ki.se
46-706-146-066
Karolinska Institutet

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Deep brain stimulation helps severe OCD, but pioneer advises caution
For patients most severely afflicted with obsessive-compulsive disorder, electrical stimulation of a brain network can re-balance their emotional state, helping them respond to conventional therapy when it never worked before. New long-term results show that patients' improvements remain if the treatment continues. But, as with other OCD treatments, DBS is not a cure and can have side effects.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Crossing borders in language science: What bilinguals tell us about mind and brain
Sonja Kotz leads the Minerva research group "Neurocognition of Rhythm in Communication" at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig. She will present evidence from neuroimaging on the impact of cognitive functions on bilingual processing at the AAAS symposium "Crossing Borders in Language Science: What Bilinguals Tell Us About Mind and Brain".

Contact: Sonja A. Kotz
kotz@cbs.mpg.de
49-341-994-02231
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Multiple approaches necessary to tackle world's food problems
Researchers need to use all available resources in an integrated approach to put agriculture on a path to solve the world's food problems while reducing pollution, according to a Penn State biologist. Changes in national and international regulations will be necessary to achieve this goal.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Research universities play a major role in national security
The United States' preoccupation with national security, including counterterrorism, counterintelligence and cyber security, is also a concern of higher education, according to Graham Spanier, president of Penn State University.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Green chemistry offers route towards zero-waste production
Novel green chemical technologies will play a key role helping society move towards the elimination of waste while offering a wider range of products from biorefineries, according to professor James Clark, Director of the Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, at the University of York.

Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-190-432-2153
University of York

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
What a rat can tell us about touch
Northwestern University's Mitra Hartmann uses the rat whisker system as a model to understand how the brain seamlessly integrates the sense of touch with movement.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Cost-effectiveness research needs to be considered in developing new medical technology
Cost-effectiveness analysis should play a bigger role in the health care system, argued a University of Chicago researcher Friday at the conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. "The effects of science and technology on health care costs depend on the policy context in which those technologies are developed and applied," said David Meltzer, Associate Professor of Medicine, in the talk "Policies to Mobile Technology and Science for Health Care Cost Control."

Contact: William Harms
w-harms@uchicago.edu
773-702-8356
University of Chicago

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Chemist focuses on education for real-world sustainability challenges
Introductory college science classes need to improve their coverage of issues related to sustainability, a noted chemistry educator told the American Association for the Advancement of Science today.

Contact: Catherine Middlecamp
chmiddle@wisc.edu
608-263-5647
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
How disordered proteins spread from cell to cell, potentially spreading disease
Misfolded proteins can get into cells and form large aggregates by recruiting normal proteins. These aggregates are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Stanford biology Professor Ron Kopito has found that the protein linked to Huntington's can spread from one cell to another. His research may explain how these diseases spread through our brains, an understanding that might lead to the development of drugs to target the misfolded proteins.

Contact: Louis Bergeron
louisb3@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
How nature's patterns form
Alan Newell of the University of Arizona will give the talk, "The Universal Nature of Fibonacci Patterns," on Friday, Feb. 18 at the 2011 AAAS annual meeting at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. as part of the symposium, "The Growth of Form in Mathematics, Physics and Biology." The symposium begins at 8 a.m. EST and Newell's presentation is scheduled for 9 a.m.

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Fishing down food web leaves fewer big fish, more small fish in past century: UBC research
Predatory fish such as cod, tuna and groupers have declined by two-thirds over the past 100 years, while small forage fish such as sardine, anchovy and capelin have more than doubled over the same period, according to University of British Columbia researchers.

Contact: Brian Lin
brian.lin@ubc.ca
604-818-5685
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Infants raised in bilingual environments can distinguish unfamiliar languages: UBC research
Infants raised in households where Spanish and Catalan are spoken can discriminate between English and French just by watching people speak, even though they have never been exposed to these new languages before, according to University of British Columbia psychologist Janet Werker.

Contact: Brian Lin
brian.lin@ubc.ca
604-818-5685
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Asthma through the eyes of a medical anthropologist
Asthma diagnosis and management vary dramatically around the world, said David Van Sickle, an honorary associate fellow at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, during a presentation today at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: David Van Sickle
vansickle@wisc.edu
608-729-5940
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Showing releases 26-50 out of 94.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>