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AAAS Annual Meeting General Information

Contact AAAS Meetings Staff

Newsroom HQ:
Washington Convention Center
Room 204A

Thursday,
17 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
18 - 20 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Monday,
21 February

7:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

All times are US Eastern Standard Time (EST)

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2010 Highlights

EurekAlert!

AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 94.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Research News Releases

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
First certified reference material for nanoparticle size analysis
The European Commission's Joint Research Centre has developed the world's first certified nanoparticle reference material based on industry-sourced nanoparticles. This new material will help ensure the comparability of measurements worldwide, thereby facilitating trade, ensuring compliance with legislation and enhancing innovation.

Contact: Elena Gonzalez Verdesoto
elena.gonzalez-verdesoto@ec.europa.eu
32-498-986-482
European Commission Joint Research Centre

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Brown scientists to discuss best practices for the oceans
Brown University scientists will present ideas to help carry out President Obama's National Ocean Policy, which calls for better stewardship of the nation's oceans, coastal waters and the Great Lakes. Heather Leslie and Leila Sievanen will speak at the AAAS annual meeting in Washington, D.C., on the need to better understand the ocean's varied habitats and how they change over time, as well as the need to involve all constituencies in conservation and management discussions.

Contact: Richard Lewis
Richard_Lewis@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Biodiversity in danger: Which areas should be protected?
Biodiversity loss is a growing concern. Protected areas are a instrument to counteract this trend. But are protected areas really protected? Are they in the right place? Where should new protected areas be located? The European Commission's Joint Research Centre, in collaboration with other partners, is helping decision-makers to find their way through the vast amount of information needed to answer these and other questions by setting up a Digital Observatory for Protected Areas.

Contact: Elena Gonzalez Verdesoto
elena.gonzalez-verdesoto@ec.europa.eu
32-498-986-482
European Commission Joint Research Centre

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Doing good with operations research
Northwestern University's Karen Smilowitz has studied ways to optimize how freight is moved: how to reduce the distance of trucking routes, for example, or how to get companies to pool their resources and lower costs. More recently, she has taken that work and applied it to nonprofits both at a global and a local level, including finding equitable and efficient distribution of relief supplies in humanitarian logistics and improving operations for mobile delivery of asthma care.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
UC Santa Cruz scientist uses storm-chasing weather radar to track bat populations
A scientist at the University of California, Santa Cruz, working with meteorologists at the University of Oklahoma, is using mobile storm-chasing radars to follow swarms of bats as they emerge from their caves each night to forage on insects.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Guy Lasnier
lasnier@ucsc.edu
831-459-2955
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bad news/good news
A central challenge facing the planet is how to preserve forests while providing enough food to feed the world's population. It's really a "bad news/good news" story, says Eric Lambin of Stanford University and the University of Louvain.

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
EECoG may finally allow enduring control of a prosthetic or a paralyzed arm by thought alone
Washington University in St. Louis biomedical engineer Daniel Moran is developing brain-computer interfaces based on grids of electrodes that lie beneath the skull but outside the dura mater, the protective membrane that covers the brain. His next project is to slip a thin 32-electrode grid he designed with a colleague under a macaque's skill and to train the monkey to control -- strictly by thinking about it -- a computational model of a macaque arm.

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
OU researchers tapping the potential of radar technologies to advance aeroecology
OU researchers are part of a growing cross-disciplinary collaboration that seeks to tap the potential of radar technologies to advance aeroecology.

Contact: Jana Smith
jana.smith@ou.edu
405-325-1322
University of Oklahoma

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Syracuse University scientist to speak on evolution and Islam at AAAS Annual Meeting
Jason Wiles, assistant professor of biology in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences, will present "Teaching and Learning about Biological Evolution in the Muslim World," on Friday, Feb. 18 during the 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C., (Feb. 17-21).

Contact: Judy Holmes
jlholmes@syr.edu
315-443-8085
Syracuse University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Physicists build bigger 'bottles' of antimatter to unlock nature's secrets
Once regarded as the stuff of science fiction, antimatter -- the mirror image of the ordinary matter in our observable universe -- is now the focus of laboratory studies around the world. While physicists routinely produce antimatter with radioisotopes and particle colliders, cooling these antiparticles and containing them for any length of time is another story. Clifford Surko, a professor of physics at UC San Diego, is constructing what he hopes will be the world's largest antimatter container.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Juggling languages can build better brains
Once likened to a confusing tower of Babel, speaking more than one language can actually bolster brain function by serving as a mental gymnasium, according to researchers.

Contact: Matt Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
US will no longer dominate science and research
A shift in the global research landscape will reposition the United States as a major partner, but not the dominant leader, in science and technology research in the coming decade, according to a Penn State researcher. However, the US could benefit from this research shift if it adopts a policy of knowledge sharing with the growing global community of researchers.

Contact: Matt Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
'Telecoupling' explains why it's a small (and fast) world, after all
Understanding and managing how humans and nature sustainably coexist is now so sweeping and lightning fast that it's spawned a concept to be unveiled at a major scientific conference today. Meet "telecoupling," which describes how distance is shrinking and connections are strengthening between nature and humans.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-282-1093
Michigan State University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
BU's Kunz to introduce new discipline of aeroecology at AAAS symposium
A team of research biologists headed by Thomas H. Kunz, professor of biology and director of the Center of Ecology and Conservation Biology at Boston University, will conduct a symposium on the emerging scientific discipline of aeroecology at this year's American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting.

Contact: Lindsay Grossman
lrg@bu.edu
617-353-6982
Boston University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Taking brain-computer interfaces to the next phase
You may have heard of virtual keyboards controlled by thought, brain-powered wheelchairs, and neuro-prosthetic limbs. But powering these machines can be downright tiring, a fact that prevents the technology from being of much use to people with disabilities, among others. Professor José del R. Millán and his team at the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland have a solution: engineer the system so that it learns about its user, allows for periods of rest, and even multitasking.
Defitech

Contact: Michael Mitchell
michael.mitchell@epfl.ch
41-798-103-107
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 17-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Bears uncouple temperature and metabolism for hibernation, new study shows
New findings show that although black bears only reduce their body temperatures slightly during hibernation, their metabolic activity drops dramatically, slowing to about 25 percent of their normal, active rates. This feat leads researchers to believe that, in the future, the data collected in this study might be applied to a very wide range of endeavors -- from improving medical care to pioneering deep space travel.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Dr. Todd Kuiken, pioneer of bionic arm control at RIC, to present latest advances at AAAS meeting
Todd Kuiken, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Center for Bionic Medicine and Director of Amputee Services at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, will present the latest in targeted muscle reinnervation, a bionic limb technology, during the opening press briefing and a subsequent symposium at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

Contact: Gillian Roberts
gillian.roberts@edelman.com
312-240-2874
Edelman Public Relations

Public Release: 17-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
The real avatar
That feeling of being in, and owning, your own body is a fundamental human experience. Now, Professor Olaf Blanke, a neurologist with the Brain Mind Institute at EPFL and the Department of Neurology at the University of Geneva in Switzerland, announces an important step in decoding the phenomenon. By combining techniques from cognitive science with those of virtual reality and brain imaging, he and his team are narrowing in on the first experimental, data-driven approach to understanding self-consciousness.

Contact: Michael Mitchell
michael.mitchell@epfl.ch
41-798-103-107
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 17-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mayo researchers, Rochester educators, students to present at science conference
America's largest general science conference will be the setting next week for seven presentations on how zebrafish changed the classroom in Rochester.

Contact: Robert Nellis
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 17-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
NASA highlights at American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting
NASA researchers will discuss a wide range of scientific and space exploration topics at the 2011 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The meeting takes place Feb. 17-21 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, 801 Mount Vernon Pl. NW, Washington, D.C.

Contact: Trent Perrotto
Trent.j.perrotto@nasa.gov
202-358-0321
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Improving microscopy by following the astronomers' guide star
A corrective strategy used by astronomers to sharpen images of celestial bodies can now help scientists see with more depth and clarity into the living brain of a mouse. Eric Betzig will present his team's latest work using adaptive optics for biology at the 2011 AAAS meeting.

Contact: Andrea Widener
widenera@hhmi.org
301-215-8807
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Public Release: 17-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Canadian brainpower at AAAS in Washington
Three leading Canadian language and speech specialists will take center stage in discussions about the latest in speech research at this year's annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Contact: Arnet Sheppard
arnet.sheppard@nserc-crsng.gc.ca
613-293-3502
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 17-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
New Pitt projects will test brain computer interfaces for people with spinal cord injury
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have been awarded funding for two projects that will place brain-computer interfaces in patients with spinal cord injuries to test if it is possible for them to control external devices, such as a computer cursor or a prosthetic limb, with their thoughts.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Stacey Simon
SimonSL@upmc.edu
412-586-9772
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Grant Announcements

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
NIFA announces grants to study the effects of climate change on agricultural and forest production
USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today awarded three Coordinated Agriculture Projects (CAP) representing a major scientific investment in studying the effects of climate change on agriculture and forest production. NIFA Director Roger Beachy made the announcement today at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C.
US Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Contact: Jennifer Martin
jmartin@nifa.usda.gov
202-720-8188
United States Department of Agriculture - Research, Education and Economics

Public Release: 18-Feb-2011
2011 AAAS Annual Meeting
Recipe for success
The ability to stay ahead of climate change is vital to the agricultural industry -- crops thrive or diminish based upon climate variables. Research collaboration between the University of Idaho, Washington State University and Oregon State University -- all western land-grant institutions -- aims to help agriculture anticipate climate change and protect and increase yields. The research, led by Idaho, is funded by a $20 million grant from the USDA.
US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Tania Thompson
taniat@uidaho.edu
208-310-1368
University of Idaho

Showing releases 51-75 out of 94.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>