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AAAS Annual Meeting General Information

Contact AAAS Meetings Staff

Newsroom HQ:
Washington Convention Center
Room 204A

Thursday,
17 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
18 - 20 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Monday,
21 February

7:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

All times are US Eastern Standard Time (EST)

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2010 Highlights

EurekAlert!

AAAS Annual Meeting

program

Interview with Dr. Terry Hazen

Terry Hazen is a microbial ecologist with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory where he heads both the Ecology Department and the Center for Environmental Biotechnology. In addition he is a principal investigator with both the Joint BioEnergy Institute and the Energy Biosciences Institute, where he spearheads the search for new microbes and their organic-degrading enzymes in Puerto Rican rain forests and other exotic locales.

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Recent Research Papers | About Dr. Terry Hazen


Recent Research Papers

Hazen, T. C., E. A. Dubinsky, T. Z. DeSantis, G. L. Andersen, Y. M. Piceno, N. Singh, J. R. Jansson, A. Probst, S. E. Borglin, J. L. Fortney, W. T. Stringfellow, M. Bill, M. S. Conrad, L. M. Tom, K. L. Chavarria, T. R. Alusi, R. Lamendella, D. C. Joyner, C. Spier, M. Auer, M. L. Zemla, R. Chakraborty, E. L. Sonnenthal, P. D'haeseleer, H.-Y. N. Holman, S. Osman, Z. Lu, J. D. Van Nostrand, Y. Deng, J. Zhou., and O. U. Mason.
2010. Deep-sea oil plume enriches psychrophilic oil-degrading bacteria.
Science 330:204-208. LBNL-3989E. (25.940, 1)

Wu, C. H., B. Sercu, L. C. Van De Werfhorst, J. Wong, T. Z. DeSantis, E. L. Brodie, T. C. Hazen, P. A. Holden, and G. L. Andersen.
2010. Characterization of Coastal Urban Watershed Bacterial Communities Leads to Alternative Community-Based Indicators.
PLoS ONE 5(6): e11285. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0011285

Byrne-Bailey, K. G., K. C. Wrighton, R. A. Melnyk, P. Agbo, T. C. Hazen, and J. D. Coates.
2010. Draft genome sequence of Therminicola potens strain JR.
J. Bacteriol. doi:10.1128/JB.00044-10

Zhou, A., Z. He, A.M. Redding, A. Mukhopadhyay, C. L. Hemme, M. P. Joachimiak, K. S. Bender, J. D. Keasling, D. A. Stahl, M. W. Fields, T. C. Hazen, A. P. Arkin, J. D. Wall, and J. Zhou.
2010. Distinctive oxidative stress responses to hydrogen peroxide in sulfate reducing bacteria. Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.
Environ. Microbiol. doi:10.1111/j.1462-2920.2010.02234.x LBNL-2535E. (4.909, 0)

About Dr. Terry Hazen

Terry Hazen is a microbial ecologist with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory where he heads both the Ecology Department and the Center for Environmental Biotechnology. In addition he is a principal investigator with both the Joint BioEnergy Institute and the Energy Biosciences Institute, where he spearheads the search for new microbes and their organic-degrading enzymes in Puerto Rican rain forests and other exotic locales.

He received his Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Interdepartmental Biology from Michigan State University, and his Ph.D. in Microbial Ecology from Wake Forest University. He has authored more than 220 scientific publications and is one of only four U.S. Department of Energy Distinguished Scientists.

A leading authority on environmental microbiology, especially as it relates to bioremediation, water quality and bioenergy, Terry Hazen has studied numerous oil-spill sites in the past, and cleaned up a large number of oil contaminated sites.

When a deepwater oil plume was formed in the aftermath of the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico this past summer, Terry Hazen led a team that was able to directly study the microbial activity within the oil plume. His report that the oil had been degraded to virtually undetectable levels within a few weeks after the damaged wellhead was finally sealed made headlines across the country.