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AAAS Annual Meeting General Information

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Newsroom HQ:
Vancouver Convention Centre
Room 221

Thursday,
16 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
17 - 19 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Monday,
20 February

7:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 101.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 17-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
SomaLogic's breakthrough proteomic technology to be presented at AAAS Annual meeting
“Prediction” is only part of what is needed to realize the promise of personalized medicine: It is perhaps more critical to detect the early onset of disease in real time, when it is most likely to be successfully treated. Dr. Larry Gold, CEO of SomaLogic and Professor at CU Boulder, will present a breakthrough technology in a talk entitled "Unlocking Biomarker Discovery" on Feb. 17, 2012, at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada.

Contact: Fintan R. Steele, Ph.D.
fsteele@somalogic.com
720-214-3080
SomaLogic, Inc.

Public Release: 16-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
New study shows no evidence of groundwater contamination from hydraulic fracturing
Hydraulic fracturing of shale formations to extract natural gas has no direct connection to reports of groundwater contamination, based on evidence reviewed in a study released Thursday by the Energy Institute at the University of Texas at Austin.
Energy Institute/University of Texas at Austin

Contact: Gary Rasp
grasp@energy.utexas.edu
512-585-2084
The Energy Institute at UT Austin

Public Release: 16-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science Translational Medicine
Successful human tests for first wirelessly controlled drug-delivery chip
About 15 years ago, MIT professors Robert Langer and Michael Cima had the idea to develop a programmable, wirelessly controlled microchip that would deliver drugs after implantation in a patient's body. This week, the MIT researchers and scientists from MicroCHIPS Inc. reported that they have successfully used such a chip to administer daily doses of an osteoporosis drug normally given by injection. The results, published in the Feb. 16 online edition of Science Translational Medicine, represent the first successful test of such a device.
MicroCHIPS

Contact: Kimberly Allen
allenkc@mit.edu
617-253-2702
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science Translational Medicine
First successful human results achieved: Implantable wireless microchip drug delivery device
The first successful human study was announced for an implantable, wireless microchip device for drug delivery. The study validates the ability of the microchip device to deliver drug doses for a year or more, avoiding daily injections and enabling reliable management of disease. In the study, patients with osteoporosis received daily doses of the osteoporosis drug, teriparatide, through the implanted microchip, and results showed effective therapeutic levels of the drug with strong safety and tolerability.
MicroCHIPS Inc.

Contact: Kathryn Morris
kathryn@theyatesnetwork.com
914-204-6412
The Yates Network

Public Release: 16-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science Translational Medicine
Implantable microchip delivers medicine to women with osteoporosis
Osteoporosis patients could soon ditch daily injection pens for an implantable microchip that releases medication at the push of a remote-controlled button, reports new study appearing Feb. 16 2012 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-7088
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
Marine protected areas: changing climate could require change of plans
Marine protected areas may turn out to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. As a result of changing conditions, marine species have been on the move with observed shifts of as much as three kilometers per year over the past 50 years, and forecasts of shifts of as much as 300 kilometers in the coming 50 years.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Brad deYoung
bdeyoung@mun.ca
709-690-3318
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

Public Release: 16-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
Human Molecular Genetics
Common flame retardant linked to social, behavioral and learning deficits
Mice genetically engineered to be susceptible to autism-like behaviors that were exposed to a common flame retardant were less fertile and their offspring were smaller, less sociable and demonstrated marked deficits in learning and long-term memory when compared with the offspring of normal unexposed mice, a study by researchers at UC Davis has found.
National Institutes of Health, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, NIH/National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, Environmental Protection Agency/Center for Children's Environmental Health

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 16-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS workshop: Research collaborations with India and Brazil
This AUCC workshop will look at how Canada is positioning itself as a world leader in research and innovation -- in part through enhanced partnerships and collaborations with emerging nations -- and how this strategy fits with the country's ongoing mission of attracting the best and brightest minds from around the world to its universities.

Contact: Helen Murphy
hmurphy@aucc.ca
613-608-8749
Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada

Public Release: 16-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
Energy poverty creating a respiratory disease 'epidemic' for almost half the world's population
Limited access to clean sources of energy, known as energy poverty, makes nearly half the world's population reliant on burning wood, animal waste, coal or charcoal to cook. This leads to severe respiratory diseases that kill roughly two million people worldwide each year, a problem University of British Columbia researchers are trying to solve.

Contact: Basil Waugh
basil.waugh@ubc.ca
604-219-8077
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 16-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
Berkeley Lab researchers at AAAS
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab researchers will be presenting at this year's AAAS meeting in Vancouver.

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-326-2092
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
Paving the way to Canada's next big industry -- the quantum information frontier
Canada's quantum leaders, including Raymond Laflamme, will be participating at this week's annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, starting with the Canada Foundation for Innovation, Dialogues at UBC Robson Square, this Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 6 p.m.
Canada Foundation for Innovation

Contact: Ryan Saxby Hill
ryansaxbyhill@innovation.ca
613-294-6247
Canada Foundation for Innovation

Public Release: 15-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS-SFU research: Vancouver, unique space for innovation
A new study co-authored by SFU communication professor Adam Holbrook says national, provincial and local economic development policy makers need to pay closer attention to Vancouver's uniqueness as a space for economic innovation. Holbrook says: "Vancouver must build on its economic, social and natural advantages. Otherwise, Vancouver could lose its global edge as an innovator in the development of knowledge-based high tech industries." Holbrook will elaborate on his findings in a presentation at the AAAS.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
X-ray microscopy seen as next wave in structural biology research
Researchers will explore how X-ray imaging can surpass X-ray crystallography for gathering detailed structural and functional information.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
Working together to bounce back from disaster
While examining two of the world's largest environmental crises in recent history – the 2011 Japanese earthquake, tsunami and nuclear emergency and the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the US's Gulf of Mexico – a group of experts will discuss how communities can better bounce back from disasters.

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
Integrating society with climate science, stabilizing carbon dioxide levels
Researchers will discuss innovative ways to make climate research more approachable and understandable for society at a Friday AAAS symposium.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Award Announcement

Public Release: 15-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
Research probing a quantum phase transition wins the 2011 AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize, supported by Affymetrix
A method to observe individual atoms in an ultra-cold gas as they transitioned from one quantum state to another won the 2011 Newcomb Cleveland Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Affymetrix

Contact: Ginger Pinholster or Natasha D. Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 8-Jan-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
Utah biologist wins 2011 AAAS Public Engagement with Science Award
The American Association for the Advancement of Science has named Nalini M. Nadkarni of the University of Utah as the recipient of the 2011 AAAS Public Engagement with Science Award, recognizing "her unique, persistent and innovative public engagement activities that have served to raise awareness of environmental and conservation issues with a broad and exceedingly diverse audience."
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Contact: Lee Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-581-8993
University of Utah

Public Release: 9-Dec-2011
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS and University of South Florida announce 2011 Fellows
Four faculty members from the University of South Florida, Tampa Bay, have been named Fellows of the AAAS. Yogi Goswami for his distinguished contributions to research, development and education in renewable energies; Alan Hevner for his contributions to the field of computer sciences; Robert Tykot for his contributions to archaeological materials science; Michael Zaworotko for his contributions to solid-state chemistry and crystal engineering.

Contact: Judy Lowry
jhlowry@usf.edu
813-974-3181
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Science Business News Release

Public Release: 13-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
More than 40 UBC researchers present leading Canadian research at global science conference
The University of British Columbia community has come out in full force to take part in the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the largest general scientific gathering in the world.

Contact: Brian Lin
brian.lin@ubc.ca
604-822-2234
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 3-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
SFU scientists seek teaching excitement at AAAS
Thousands of scientists, including many from SFU, will descend upon Vancouver, Feb. 16-20 to not only share research discoveries but also hone their skills as science educators. They will share their teaching trade secrets at the 2012 American Association for the Advancement of Science conference, known as the world's largest science fair. SFU's Faculty of Science is sponsoring 10 faculty members, two staff and two graduate students to attend the AAAS' symposium on education.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Meeting Announcement

Public Release: 19-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS 2012 talks from the Earth Institute
Scientists at Columbia University’s Earth Institute will present important new work on global climate, air pollution, agriculture and other issues at the Feb. 16-20 meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in Vancouver, BC.

Contact: Kevin Krajick
kkrajick@ei.columbia.edu
212-854-9729
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 10-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
SFU health scientist joins governor general's roundtable at AAAS
Kate Tairyan, an SFU health scientist and director of public health at Next Generation University, will use a meeting with Canada's governor general at the AAAS conference to promote the world's first free university.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 10-Feb-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
SFU cell biologist Lynne Quarmby will address top-flight American high school science students at AAAS conference in Vancouver
Lynne Quarmby, a Simon Fraser University cell biologist with a passion for promoting science, will deliver a talk to 30-top flight American high school science students and their teachers about the importance of basic science. Quarmby will be the keynote speaker at the Feb. 16 AJAS meeting at SFU Burnaby. It strategically brings together the crème de la crème of young American science students during the AAAS meeting in Vancouver.

Contact: Carol Thorbes (SFU PAMR)
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 31-Jan-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
Advisory: University of Louisville faculty at AAAS Annual Meeting
University of Louisville faculty will conduct sessions on efforts to tackle infectious diseases across specialties and in tobacco harm reduction to reduce illness and death at the 178th American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting, one of the largest gatherings of scientists from around the world. The meeting features thousands of top scientists, engineers, educators, policymakers and science journalists from 50 nations and a full spectrum of disciplines.

Contact: Jill Scoggins
jill.scoggins@louisville.edu
502-852-7461
University of Louisville

Public Release: 27-Jan-2012
2012 AAAS Annual Meeting
SFU scientists to wow non-scientists at AAAS
Three Simon Fraser University researchers known for generating passion about science -- Nancy Forde, Sophie Lavieri and Sarah Johnson -- will be talking up science to non-scientists at the 2012 AAAS. Forde will demonstrate how her research into building biological molecular motors is akin to building toys with LEGO. Lavieri and Johnson will put science in action by mounting colourful experiments showcasing superconductors and lasers.

Contact: Carol Thorbes (SFUPAMR)
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Showing releases 76-100 out of 101.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>