2013 Fellowships for International Science Reporters

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AAAS Annual Meeting General Information

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Newsroom HQ:
Hynes Convention Center
Room 101

Thursday,
14 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
15 - 17 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Monday,
18 February

7:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

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2012 Highlights

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AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 91.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 19-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Engineering control theory helps create dynamic brain models
Models of the human brain, patterned on engineering control theory, may some day help researchers control such neurological diseases as epilepsy, Parkinson's and migraines, according to a Penn State researcher who is using mathematical models of neuron networks from which more complex brain models emerge.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 19-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
International space station plays host to innovative infectious disease research
Cheryl Nickerson, a microbiologist at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, is using the ISS platform to pursue new research into the effects of microgravity on disease-causing organisms.

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Artful science
There are "things hidden in plain sight" all around us. But art can help students see their world anew, unlocking discoveries in fields ranging from plant biology to biomedical imaging, according to University of Delaware professor John Jungck, who spoke on the topic at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston.

Contact: Andrea Boyle Tippett
aboyle@udel.edu
302-831-1421
University of Delaware

Public Release: 18-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
International space station plays host to innovative infectious disease research
Nickerson, a microbiologist at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, is using the ISS platform to pursue new research into the effects of microgravity on disease-causing organisms.
National Institutes of Health, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
joseph.caspermeyer@asu.edu
480-727-0369
Arizona State University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stem cell-based bioartificial tissues and organs
Surgeon Paolo Macchiarini has made his name by successfully transplanting bioengineered stem cell-based trachea, composed of both artificial and biological material. He now plans to use the technique to recreate more complex tissues, such as the esophagus and diaphragm or organs such as the heart and lungs. He has also made an experimental attempt to regenerate brain in mice and rats. This is part of the news he will be presenting during his seminar at the scientific AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston.

Contact: Sabina Bossi
sabina.bossi@ki.se
46-706-146-066
Karolinska Institutet

Public Release: 18-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
ASU professors study the social dynamics of scientific collaborations
Society currently faces profound social and environmental challenges that must be met to secure a sustainable future. A major challenge in achieving this goal is discovering how best to synthesize important findings and ideas from many disciplines and use them to produce scientifically informed social and environmental policy. New research by John Parker and Edward Hackett of Arizona State University works to identify types of research environments and social interactions that facilitate success in these collaborations.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Food science expert: Genetically modified crops are overregulated
University of Illinois professor emeritus of the department of food science and nutrition Bruce Chassy will present a talk in which he argues genetically modified foods are safe for consumption and overregulated.

Contact: Chelsey B. Coombs
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Media advisory: AAAS session addresses infrastructure design in a changing climate
As our climate changes, the way we engineer our cities must, too. That's the message that University of New Hampshire professor Paul Kirshen, an author of a recent report that assessed Boston's vulnerability to coastal flooding, will deliver at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting February 14-18, 2013, in Boston.

Contact: Beth Potier
beth.potier@unh.edu
603-397-7505
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Media advisory: AAAS session addresses city infrastructure design in a changing climate
As our climate changes, the way we engineer our cities must, too. That's the message that University of New Hampshire professor Paul Kirshen, an author of a recent report that assessed Boston's vulnerability to coastal flooding, will deliver at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting Feb. 14-18, 2013, in Boston.

Contact: Beth Potier
beth.potier@unh.edu
603-397-7505
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Get your brain fit
We all know the importance of keeping healthy and are familiar with the refrains of "exercise more," "eat better" and "get regular physicals." But what about our mental health? Professor Barbara Sahakian, best known for her expertise on cognitive enhancers, challenges society (and government) to prioritize mental health in the same way as we do physical health.

Contact: Genevieve Maul
gm349@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-65542
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Arrhythmia culprit caught in action
Using powerful X-rays, University of British Columbia researchers have reconstructed a crime scene too small for any microscope to observe -- and caught the culprit of arrhythmia in action.

Contact: Brian Lin
brian.lin@ubc.ca
604-818-5685
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
The quest for a better bionic hand
New implantable interfaces connect a hand prosthesis to the nerves, making for smarter prosthetics that feel and function more like the real thing.

Contact: Hillary Sanctuary
hillary.sanctuary@epfl.ch
41-797-034-809
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Forging a new periodic table using nanostructures
Northwestern University's Chad Mirkin has developed a new set of building blocks based on nanoparticles and DNA. Using these tools, scientists will be able to build -- from the bottom up, just as nature does -- new and useful structures. Mirkin has built more than 200 different crystal structures with 17 different particle arrangements. Some of the lattice types can be found in nature, but many are new structures that have no naturally occurring mineral counterpart.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
In the blink of an eye: X-ray imaging on the attosecond timescale
Berkeley Lab's Ali Belkacem has been using powerful laboratory-scale lasers to test whether multidimensional nonlinear x-ray spectroscopy on the attosecond timescale is practical for the light sources of the future -- and just what combination of beam characteristics is needed to define them. He'll discuss his work as part of the panel session titled "Attosecond Science in Chemical, Molecular Imaging, Spintronics, and Energy Science."

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Thirsty crops and hungry people: Symposium to examine realities of water security
Faced with an increasingly hungry world and limited supplies of water for food production, how do we ensure water security for future generations? That's the central question being addressed at an AAAS symposium on Sunday, Feb. 17.
American Society of Agronomy

Contact: Fred Vocasek
fredv@servitechlabs.com
620-338-2076
American Society of Agronomy

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
ASU professor sees Rachel Carson's early careers as a model for today's science journalism crisis
One area of Rachel Carson's career that is often overlooked is her time as a government employee. This is where she got her true start in journalism and it is the area G. Pascal Zachary, professor of practice with the Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes at Arizona State University, will be discussing at the 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Boston.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-0478
Arizona State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Evidence shows concussions require long-term follow-up for players
As the National Football League braces for lawsuits by 4000 former players alleging the league failed to protect them from the long-term consequences of concussions, game-changing research by a leading Canadian researcher shows damage to the brain can persist for decades after the original head trauma.
Canada Foundation for Innovation

Contact: Ryan Saxby Hill
ryansaxbyhill@innovation.ca
613-294-6247
Canada Foundation for Innovation

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
ArcticNet recommends practical solutions to improve standard of living in Canada's north
Northern communities are in the midst of a period of intense and rapid change brought on by modernization, industrialization and the realities of climate change. From preserving the means to hunt caribou to protecting stocks of arctic char - balancing development with a respect and preservation of traditional means of sustainability may be key to improving standards of living in the North.
Canada Foundation for Innovation

Contact: Ryan Saxby Hill
ryansaxbyhill@innovation.ca
613-294-6247
Canada Foundation for Innovation

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Canada's top water expert brings lessons on water resource management to AAAS
At the Global Institute for Water Security at the University of Saskatchewan, director Howard Wheater and his team use the Saskatchewan River Basin as a large-scale case study to generate the science underpinning the policies and practices governments, consumers and water users need to respond to rapid environmental change.
Canada Excellence Research Chairs

Contact: Ryan Saxby Hill
ryansaxbyhill@innovation.ca
613-294-6247
Canada Foundation for Innovation

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Wiring the ocean
For most people, the sea is a deep, dark mystery. That is changing, though, as scientists find innovative ways to track the movements of ocean-going creatures.

Contact: Bjorn Carey
bccarey@stanford.edu
Stanford University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Key to cleaner environment may be right beneath our feet
While many people recognize that clean water and air are signs of a healthy ecosystem, most do not realize that a critical part of the environment is right beneath their feet, according to a Penn State hydrologist.

Contact: Matthew Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Nature
Diamond sheds light on basic building blocks of life
The UK's national synchrotron facility, Diamond Light Source, is now the first and only place in Europe where pathogens requiring Containment Level 3 – including serious viruses such as those responsible for AIDS, Hepatitis and some types of flu – can be analyzed at atomic and molecular level using synchrotron light. Studying pathogens in this way has the potential to open up new paths for the development of therapeutic treatments and vaccines.

Contact: Isabelle Boscaro-Clarke
isabelle.boscaro-clarke@diamond.ac.uk
0044-079-907-97916
Diamond Light Source

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
US science policy should focus on outcomes not efficiencies, says ASU professor
Given the huge investment and power of science and technology in the US it is surprising that more attention isn't paid to the policy decisions that drive the enterprise, said Daniel Sarewitz, co-director of the Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes at Arizona State University. What appears to be missing from the equation, he added, is a focus on outcomes. Sarewitz was speaking at the 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting.

Contact: Skip Derra
Skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Microbes team up to boost plants' stress tolerance
While most farmers consider viruses and fungi potential threats to their crops, these microbes can help wild plants adapt to extreme conditions, according to a Penn State virologist.

Contact: Matthew Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Modern alchemy, fusion energy and more from Princeton
A possible Higgs boson of cancer and steps to give natural biodiversity a fighting chance will be among the topics Princeton University researchers will discuss during the 2013 AAAS annual meeting. All information is embargoed until the beginning of the respective session.

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 91.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>