2013 Fellowships for International Science Reporters

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AAAS Annual Meeting General Information

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Newsroom HQ:
Hynes Convention Center
Room 101

Thursday,
14 February

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Friday - Sunday,
15 - 17 February

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Monday,
18 February

7:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

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2012 Highlights

EurekAlert!

AAAS Annual Meeting

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 91.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Research News Releases

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
A new way of looking at drug discovery
Garret FitzGerald from Penn, has long said the current drug-development system in the United States is in need of change, "representing an unsustainable model." As the dominance of large pharma erodes and the process of drug discovery and development moves to a more modular approach, new initiatives are designed to enhance the ability of academia to play in this space. Novel approaches to raising capital and to distributing intellectual property are emerging.

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-459-0544
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Walking again after spinal injury
In the lab, rats with severe spinal cord injury are learning to walk -- and run -- again.

Contact: Hillary Sanctuary
hillary.sanctuary@epfl.ch
41-797-034-809
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Circulation
Rice University analysis links ozone levels, cardiac arrest
Researchers at Rice University, working with a massive data set unique to Houston, have found a direct correlation between out-of-hospital heart attacks and levels of air pollution and ozone.
Houston Endowment, City of Houston

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Brown University scientists to discuss resilience of coastal communities at AAAS
Heather Leslie and Leila Sievanen are members of an interdisciplinary research team focused on human-environment interactions in coastal regions. They will participate in a symposium titled, "Building Resilience of Coastal Communities to Environmental and Institutional Shocks," at the AAAS meeting in Boston.
National Science Foundation, Brown University/Environmental Change Initiative, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Fighting disease deep inside the brain
Mini, ultra-flexible electrodes could improve treatment of Parkinson's and other health issues.

Contact: Hillary Sanctuary
hillary.sanctuary@epfl.ch
41-797-034-809
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 17-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Briefing explores associations between air pollution and health outcomes
Health risks associated with high levels of air pollution may vary between neighborhoods across large urban populations.

Contact: Melva Robertson
melva.robertson@emory.edu
404-727-5692
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Seeing is believing: Biologists and physicists produce revealing images of cell organization, behavior
The leading edge of creative, interdisciplinary collaboration in microscopy will be explored in "Innovations in Imaging: Seeing is Believing," Saturday, Feb. 16, 1:30-4:30 PM at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston.

Contact: Diana Kenney
dkenney@mbl.edu
508-685-3525
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
The research is in: Physical activity enhances cognition
University of Illinois psychology professor and Beckman Institute director Art Kramer will present a talk about how physical activity boosts cognition and brain health at the 2013 AAAS meeting.

Contact: Chelsey B. Coombs
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mussels cramped by environmental factors
The fibrous threads helping mussels stay anchored -- in spite of waves that sometimes pound the shore with a force equivalent to a jet liner flying at 600 miles per hour -- are more prone to snap when ocean temperatures climb higher than normal.
Natinal Science Foundation

Contact: Sandra Hines
shines@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mussel-inspired 'glue' for surgical repair and cancer drug delivery
When it comes to sticking power under wet conditions, marine mussels are hard to beat. Northwestern University's Phillip Messersmith has created new materials that mimic mussel adhesive proteins for three medical applications: sealants for fetal membrane repair, self-setting antibacterial hydrogels, and polymers for cancer drug delivery and thermal destruction of cancer cells. All of his materials contain a synthetic form of the catecholic amino acid DOPA (dihydroxyphenylalanine), one of the keys to mussels' sticking power.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Strengthening speech networks to treat aphasia
Decades of research have helped scientists like Sheila Blumstein of Brown University understand how the brain produces speech. At the AAAS conference in Boston Feb. 16, 2013, she will speak about her efforts to translate those basic findings into a therapy for patients with aphasia.

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mentoring models to move minorities to majorities in STEM
Evidence of a shift in US demographics and importance of minorities took center stage during the Presidential election, but how do those growing toward majority acquire representation in our educational and technological communities?
National Science Foundation

Contact: Margaret Coulombe
margaret.coulombe@asu.edu
602-702-2415
Arizona State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Using transportation data to predict pandemics
In a world of increasing global connections, predicting the spread of infectious diseases is more complicated than ever. Using network theory and transportation data, Northwestern University's Dirk Brockmann developed a computational model that can generate with high accuracy the origin of an outbreak and the predicted arrival times of a pandemic in specific locations. His work shows that cities with a very high level of connectedness, such as London, are important epicenters for tracking the spread of diseases.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Brain prostheses create a sense of touch
Infrared sensing might be built into a whole-body prosthesis for paraplegics so patients wearing the "exoskeleton" could have sensory information about where their limbs are and how objects feel when they touch them.

Contact: Ashley Yeager
ashley.yeager@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
When good habits go bad
Duke University neurologist and neuroscientist Nicole Calakos studies what happens when synaptic connections aren't as adaptable as they should be in the basal ganglia, the brain's "command center" for turning information into actions.

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Going negative: Stanford scientists explore new technologies that remove atmospheric CO2
Reducing carbon dioxide emissions may not be enough to curb global warming, say Stanford University scientists. The solution could require carbon-negative technologies that actually remove large amounts of CO2 from the atmosphere.
Global Climate and Energy Project, Stanford University

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Preparing for climate change-induced weather disasters
The news sounds grim: Mounting scientific evidence indicates climate change will lead to more frequent and intense extreme weather that affects larger areas and lasts longer. However, we can reduce the risk of weather-related disasters with a variety of measures, according to Stanford scientist Chris Field.

Contact: Bjorn Carey
bccarey@stanford.edu
Stanford University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Flow of research on ice sheets helps answer climate questions
Just as ice sheets slide slowly and steadily into the ocean, researchers are returning from each trip to the Arctic and Antarctic with more data about climate change, including information that will help improve current models on how climate change will affect life on the earth, according to a Penn State geologist.

Contact: Matthew Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Academics grapple with balancing their research with the need to communicate it to the public
Researchers today more than ever focus their work on real-world problems, often times making their research relevant to the public locally, regionally and nationally. But engaging the public in their research can be a daunting task for researchers both professionally and personally. Leah Gerber, an Arizona State University professor, has identified impediments to productive science communication and she shared her recommendations at the 2013 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Modern life may cause sun exposure, skin pigmentation mismatch
As people move more often and become more urbanized, skin color -- an adaptation that took hundreds of thousands of years to develop in humans -- may lose some of its evolutionary advantage, according to a Penn State anthropologist.

Contact: Matthew Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Malawi's bountiful harvests and healthier children
In Malawi, the fields are full -- and so are the children. Through research led by Michigan State University, crop yields have increased dramatically. The children of Ekwendi, Malawi, also have gained weight and are taller. These improvements bring smiles to Sieglinde Snapp, MSU ecologist, and other researchers who have worked in Malawi for many years.
National Science Foundation, McKnight Foundation, US Agency for International Development

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Studying networks to help women succeed in science
Northwestern University's Noshir Contractor is using his network expertise to help women succeed in research. He has examined both the determinants that help women persist in networks and the role of social networks among women who work in the specialized area of gender and sustainability. Using data from Facebook and LinkedIn pages and interviews, Contractor now is working to implement a social media recommender system for this group that will enhance cross-cultural mentoring.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Teaching the brain to speak again
"Use it or lose it," says stroke and brain damage researcher Cynthia Thompson, who has played a key role in demonstrating the brain's plasticity. On Feb. 16, she presents her groundbreaking research that offers hope to chronic sufferers of aphasia (a disorder affecting one million Americans). "Language training focused on principles of normal language processing stimulates the recovery of neural networks that support language even 10 or more years post-stroke," she says.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Wendy Leopold
w-leopold@northwestern.edu
847-491-4890
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Evolution helped turn hairless skin into a canvas for self-expression
Hairless skin first evolved in humans as a way to keep cool -- and then turned into a canvas to help them look cool, according to a Penn State anthropologist.

Contact: Matthew Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 16-Feb-2013
2013 AAAS Annual Meeting
Historic legacy of lead pollution persists despite regulatory efforts
Efforts to reduce lead pollution have paid off in many ways, yet the problem persists and will probably continue to affect the health of people and animals well into the future, according to experts speaking at the AAAS meeting in Boston.

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Showing releases 26-50 out of 91.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>