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2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
NEWSROOM
NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 78.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 17-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Environmental issues examined through cohesive efforts
Solving crucial environmental issues such as global warming and water supply involves managing competing interests, uncertainty and risk, and this is best done through meaningful collaboration in a neutral environment.

Contact: Julie Newberg
Julie.Newberg@asu.edu
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Outsmarting nature during disasters
The dramatic images of natural disasters, including hurricanes Katrina and Sandy and the Tohoku, Japan, earthquake and tsunami, show that nature, not the people preparing for hazards, often wins the high-stakes game of chance. Geophysicist Seth Stein of Northwestern University uses general principles and case studies to explore how communities can do better by taking an integrated view of natural hazards issues, rather than treating the relevant geoscience, engineering, economics and policy formulation separately.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Zoonotic diseases and global viral pandemics
Professor Malik Peiris, Chair Professor and Acting Director of School of Public Health, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, the University of Hong Kong is one of the speakers at the 2014 Annual Meeting in Chicago organized by The American Association for the Advancement of Science on Monday, Feb. 17, 2014.

Contact: Grace Ng
gracesk@hku.hk
852-281-99995
University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Finding common ground fosters understanding of climate change
Grasping the concept of climate change and its impact on the environment can be difficult. Establishing common ground and using models, however, can break down barriers and present the concept in an easily understood manner.

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Religious and scientific communities may be less combative than commonly portrayed
One of the largest surveys of American views on religion and science suggests that the religious and scientific communities may be less combative than is commonly portrayed in the media and in politics.

Contact: Kat Zambon
kzambon@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Global perspectives on human biology and health
The research will draw on data collected from field sites in North and South America, Asia, the South Pacific and Africa to generate insights into human immune function, reproductive aging, nutrition and metabolism and chronic disease.

Contact: Hilary Hurd Anyaso
h-anyaso@northwestern.edu
847-491-4887
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Nanoelectronics key to advances in renewable energy
An Arizona State University electrical engineer explains why advances in nanoelectronics will shape the future of renewable energy technologies.

Contact: Joe Kullman
joe.kullman@asu.edu
480-965-8122
Arizona State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
What is known about the pathway to aging well?
Through his research, Daniel Mroczek has found that personality traits have emerged as unique predictors of health, well-being and longevity across various segments of the adult lifespan.  

Contact: Hilary Hurd Anyaso
h-anyaso@northwestern.edu
847-491-4887
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Transfer of knowledge learned seen as a key to improving science education
Attendees of a workshop at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science will be immersed into "active learning," an approach inspired by national reports targeting US science education, in general, and, more specifically, the 60 percent dropout rate of students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Deep ocean needs policy, stewardship where it never existed
Plans to begin mining nodules of valuable metals from deep ocean deposits have oceanographers concerned about the lack of public awareness or international agreements governing these habitats. "The deep sea is out of sight, out of mind ... there's a whole level of concern that isn't being expressed when it comes to deep sea industrialization," said Cindy Van Dover of the Duke Marine Lab.

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Using crowdsourcing to solve complex problems
Northwestern University's Haoqi Zhang designs new forms of crowd-supported, mixed-initiative systems that tightly integrate crowd work, community process and intelligent user interfaces to solve complex problems that no machine nor person could solve alone. The systems can ease challenges in designing a custom trip or planning an academic conference, for example. Zhang created Mobi, a tool that uses crowd sourcing to plan custom trip itineraries, and Cobi, which enables an academic community to plan a conference by "community-sourcing."

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Obesity in Samoa: A global harbinger?
Solving the mystery of how the population of the Samoan archipelago developed one of the world's highest rates of obesity is important not only for addressing the problem but also possibly for predicting the course of obesity in other parts of the developing world. Brown University epidemiologist Stephen McGarvey, who has been studying the Samoan pandemic for years, will speak at the AAAS annual meeting in Chicago at 1:30 p.m. US CT Feb. 16, 2014.

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Thinking it through: Scientists seek to unlock mysteries of the brain
Pioneering researchers work to uncover the circuitry of human cognition, identify the genetic roots of disease, unlock the power of Big Data for diagnosis, build a new generation of computing hardware inspired by the brain, and perform revolutionary experiments on a realistic model of the brain.

Contact: Hillary Sanctuary
Hillary.sanctuary@epfl.ch
41-797-034-809
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Loneliness is a major health risk for older adults
Feeling extreme loneliness can increase an older person's chances of premature death by 14 percent, according to research by John Cacioppo, professor of psychology at the University of Chicago.

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
ASU professor explores the ethics of scientific research and why they matter
Discovery and innovation are important to science, but how are they connected to each other, and how can they be fostered to benefit the wider public? Jason Robert, the Lincoln Chair in Ethics and Dean's Distinguished Professor of Life Sciences at Arizona State University discussed that question today (Feb. 16) at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Misconceptions of science and religion found in new study
The public's view that science and religion can't work in collaboration is a misconception that stunts progress, according to a new survey of more than 10,000 Americans, scientists and evangelical Protestants.

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Archaeologists lend long-term perspective to food security and climate shock
What role does pre-existing vulnerabilities play for people who experience a climate shock? Does it amplify the effects of the climate shock or is effect negligible? Four Arizona State University archaeologists are looking into this as part of an international team examining how people can be most resilient to climate change when it comes to food security.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Scientists call for new stewardship of the deep ocean: Earth's last frontier
Humans are encroaching more vigorously into the ocean's deep regions, exploiting its resources and putting its habitats and natural services at risk. Lisa Levin of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego believes a new "stewardship mentality" across disciplines is required for the future health and integrity of the deep ocean. Levin and several other experts will describe this need Feb. 16 during a news briefing and symposium at the AAAS meeting in Chicago.
Deep-Ocean Stewardship Initiative, Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation at Scripps

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
New study shows growing opposition to animal tests
Americans' moral opposition to animal testing has grown significantly since 2001, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the prestigious American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago.
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

Contact: Tasgola Bruner
TasgolaB@peta.org
404-907-4172
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Iowa State University's Wintersteen talks partnerships at national science meeting
Wendy Wintersteen, dean of Iowa State University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, spoke on Sunday of the importance of public-private partnerships in strengthening global food security during the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago.

Contact: Fred Love
fredlove@iastate.edu
515-294-0704
Iowa State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Journal of Urban Health
Repeal of Missouri's background check law associated with increase in state's murders
Missouri's 2007 repeal of its permit-to-purchase (PTP) handgun law, which required all handgun purchasers to obtain a license verifying that they have passed a background check, contributed to a sixteen percent increase in Missouri's murder rate, according to a new study from researchers with the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research.
Joyce Foundation

Contact: Alicia Samuels
alsamuel@jhsph.edu
914-720-4635
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 15-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Arizona State researcher explores responsible innovation
While it may be difficult to foresee, the work of scientists and engineers often has a societal impact. Arizona State University professor Erik Fisher is interested in helping them think about these impacts before it's too late.

Contact: Skip Derra
skip.derra@asu.edu
480-965-4823
Arizona State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Making biodiverse agriculture part of a food-secure future
Is biodiverse agriculture an anachronism? Or is it a vital part of a food-secure future? Given the need to feed an estimated 2.4 billion more people by the year 2050, the drive toward large-scale, single-crop farming around the world may seem inexorable. But there's an important downside to this trend, argues Timothy Johns, Professor of Human Nutrition at McGill University in Montreal.

Contact: Chris Chipello
christopher.chipello@mcgill.ca
514-717-4201
McGill University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Research on urban ghettos must recognize differences among cities
Research on urban neighborhoods must take into account differences among cities and rely on some techniques that have not been used extensively by sociologists studying neighborhood effects, according to Mario Small, professor of sociology at the University of Chicago.

Contact: Jann Ingmire
jingmire@uchicago.edu
773-702-2272
University of Chicago

Public Release: 15-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Longer commutes disadvantage African-American workers
African-Americans spend more time than any other group getting to work and in some cases spend about 15 minutes more a day than whites commuting, according to research by Virginia Parks, associate professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration.

Contact: Jann Ingmire
jingmire@uchicago.edu
773-702-2272
University of Chicago

Showing releases 1-25 out of 78.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>