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2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
NEWSROOM
NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 78.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Research News Release

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science is used to reveal masterpiece's true colors
Northwestern University chemist Richard Van Duyne, in collaboration with conservation scientists at the Art Institute of Chicago, has been using a powerful scientific method to investigate masterpieces by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Winslow Homer and Mary Cassatt. He recently identified the chemical components of paint, now partially faded, used by Renoir in his painting "Madame Léon Clapisson." The artist used carmine lake, a brilliant but light-sensitive red pigment. The scientific investigation is the cornerstone of a new exhibition at the Art Institute.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Stanford, NOAA scientists discover mechanism of crude oil heart toxicity
While studying the impact of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill on tuna, a research team led by Barbara Block, a professor of marine sciences, discovered that crude oil interrupts a molecular pathway that allows fish heart cells to beat effectively. The components of the pathway are present in the hearts of most animals, including humans.
NOAA, Stanford University and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Foundation

Contact: Randall Kochevar, Stanford Department of Biology, Block Lab
kochevar@stanford.edu
831-655-6225
Stanford University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
NOAA researcher says Arctic marine mammals are ecosystem sentinels
As the Arctic continues to see dramatic declines in seasonal sea ice, warming temperatures and increased storminess, the responses of marine mammals can provide clues to how the ecosystem is responding to these physical drivers.
NOAA

Contact: Monica Allen
monica.allen@noaa.gov
202-379-6693
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Conservation science partnership thrives, expands
For nearly a decade, Northwestern University and the Art Institute of Chicago have been partners in conservation science, unlocking secrets about the museum's masterpieces and developing new methods and technologies to investigate art. The partnership recently established a national center, and one of its first projects is with The Guggenheim. Northwestern and Art Institute scientists will be showcasing the types of problems that can benefit from the center's approach to conservation science at the AAAS meeting in Chicago.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Builder bots ditch blueprints for local cues
Termites inspired researchers to design smart robots. Without the coordinated strategy or detailed communication plan that humans building buildings require, these robots can build complex structures.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Cat parasite found in western Arctic Beluga deemed infectious
University of British Columbia scientists have found for the first time an infectious form of the cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii in western Arctic Beluga, prompting a health advisory to the Inuit people who eat whale meat.

Contact: Brian Lin
brian.lin@ubc.ca
604-818-5685
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science
Robotic construction crew needs no foreman
Computer scientists and engineers at Harvard University have created an autonomous robotic construction crew. The system needs no supervisor, no eye in the sky, and no communication: just simple robots -- any number of robots -- that cooperate by modifying their environment.
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University

Contact: Caroline Perry
cperry@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Psychological Inquiry
Marriage's 'haves' and 'have nots'
Today Americans are looking to their marriages to fulfill different goals than in the past -- and although the fulfillment of these goals requires especially large investments of time and energy in the marital relationship, on average Americans are actually making smaller investments in their marital relationship than in the past, according to new research from Northwestern University.

Contact: Hilary Hurd Anyaso
h-anyaso@northwestern.edu
847-491-4887
Northwestern University

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Targeting tumors: Ion beam accelerators take aim at cancer
Hear the latest in the development of particle accelerators for delivering cancer-killing beams from a physicist, a radiobiologist, and a clinical oncologist, and participate in a discussion about cost, access, and ethics.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Award Announcement

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Early career women scientists from developing countries honored for research
Five chemists are being honored with Elsevier Foundation Awards for Early Career Women Scientists in the Developing World, each for research that looks to nature for ways to address cancer, malaria and other medical problems.

Contact: Ylann Schemm
newsroom@elsevier.com
31-623-982-359
Elsevier

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Steven Strogatz receives the 2013 AAAS Public Engagement with Science Award
The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has named Steven Strogatz as the recipient of the 2013 AAAS Public Engagement with Science Award, recognizing "his exceptional commitment to and passion for conveying the beauty and importance of mathematics to the general public." Strogatz, the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor of Applied Mathematics at Cornell University, has contributed widely to the popularization and public understanding of mathematics through his newspaper articles, books, radio and television appearances, documentaries and public lectures.

Contact: Katharine Zambon
kzambon@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
2013 AAAS Award for Science Diplomacy goes to Siegfried Hecker
Siegfried Hecker, director emeritus of Los Alamos National Laboratory and an internationally recognized expert in plutonium science, global threat reduction, and nuclear security, has been chosen by the American Association for the Advancement of Science to receive the 2013 Award for Science Diplomacy. Hecker was honored for his "lifetime commitment to using the tools of science to address the challenges of nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism and his dedication to building bridges through science during the period following the end of the Cold War."

Contact: Katharine Zambon
kzambon@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
2013 AAAS Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award goes to Hoosen Coovadia
Hoosen Coovadia, a South African pediatrician and research scientist, and international authority on HIV/AIDS, particularly mother-to-child transmission, has been named recipient of the 2013 Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Coovadia was honored for "his unwavering belief, in the face of opposition from his government, that sound science should guide public policy and his devotion to the health of the most vulnerable."

Contact: Katharine Zambon
kzambon@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
OU professor recognized by AAAS for pioneering efforts to advance ecological forecasting
A University of Oklahoma professor has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for distinguished contributions to the field of global change ecology, particularly for pioneering development and application of data assimilation for ecological forecasting. Models or forecasts similar to those produced for weather will allow ecologists to predict how changes in the environment will alter an entire ecosystem in the future.

Contact: Jana Smith
jana.smith@ou.edu
405-325-1322
University of Oklahoma

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
2013 AAAS Mentor Award goes to Paul B. Tchounwou of Jackson State University
The 2013 Mentor Award of the American Association for the Advancement of Science will be bestowed upon Paul B. Tchounwou "for his transformative impact and contributions towards the production of African American doctorates in the field of environmental sciences." Tchounwou, associate dean of graduate studies and international programs in the College of Science, Engineering and Technology at Jackson State University in Jackson, Miss., will receive his award during a 14 February ceremony at the 2014 AAAS Annual Meeting in Chicago, Ill.

Contact: Katharine Zambon
kzambon@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mapping the mind of a mating male
A comprehensive reconstruction of the neuronal circuits for mating behaviors in the adult male roundworm won the 2013 Newcomb Cleveland Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Fodor Family Trust

Contact: Natasha D. Pinol
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Neimark Award winners study statistics, chemistry, plant sciences, astrophysics and linguistics
The five winners of the 2013 Joshua E. Neimark Memorial Travel Assistance Award study biostatistics, molecular and environmental plant sciences, chemistry, particle astrophysics, and second language acquisition.

Contact: Kat Zambon
kzambon@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Science awards best paper of the year to Albert Einstein College of Medicine
A study led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researcher Dr. Scott Emmons has been named the most outstanding Science paper published last year by AAAS. Dr. Emmons' paper describes the complete wiring diagram for the part of the nervous system that controls mating behavior in male roundworms.

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
2013 AAAS Lifetime Mentor Award goes to Andrew Tsin of the University of Texas at San Antonio
Andrew Tsin has been awarded the 2013 Lifetime Mentor Award of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for his efforts in "facilitating dramatic education and research changes at his institution, leading to a significant production of Hispanic American doctorates in the biological sciences." Tsin is a professor of biology and director of the Center for Research and Training in the Sciences at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Contact: Katharine Zambon
kzambon@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS Early Career Award for Public Engagement goes to Mary Helen Immordino-Yang
The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has honored Mary Helen Immordino-Yang with the AAAS Early Career Award for Public Engagement with Science for her "sustained commitment and novel approach to integrating public engagement with science into her extensive research and scholarly activities and for using public interactions to inform her research."

Contact: Katharine Zambon
kzambon@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
2013 AAAS Philip Hauge Abelson Prize
Lewis M. Branscomb, a prominent American physicist, policy advisor and research manager, has been chosen by the American Association for the Advancement of Science to receive the 2013 Philip Hauge Abelson Prize. He was honored "for his prolific and distinguished career in science, technology, innovation, and policy" and "for his achievements in academia, in business, in government, and as a philanthropist."

Contact: Katharine Zambon
kzambon@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
2014 AAAS/Subaru Science Books & Film winners announced
Four engaging books that explore the inner workings of a school garden, the discovery of two-million-year-old fossils, the joys and possibilities of backyard bird watching, and the practical and ethical implications of biotechnology on our relationships with domesticated animals and wildlife have earned top honors in the 2014 AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prizes for Excellence in Science Books competition.

Contact: Katharine Zambon
kzambon@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
2013 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge winners announced
Dramatic video that shows how our Sun's heat energy is driving Earth's climate and weather is among the first place winners of the annual 2013 International Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge, sponsored jointly by the journal Science and the US National Science Foundation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Natasha D. Pinol
npinol@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Meeting Announcement

Public Release: 14-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Can a virtual brain replace lab rats?
Testing the effects of drugs on a simulated brain could lead to breakthrough treatments for neurological disorders such as Parkinson's, Huntington's and Alzheimer's disease. Researchers from the University of Waterloo in Canada hope Spaun, the world's largest functioning model of the brain, will be used to test new drugs that lead to medical breakthroughs for brain disorders.

Contact: Nick Manning
nmanning@uwaterloo.ca
226-929-7627
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 14-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Stanford computer scientist to discuss how online networks can be used to study social interactions
Jure Leskovec, assistant professor of computer science at Stanford University. His research focuses on mining and modeling large social and information networks, their evolution, and diffusion of information and influence over them.

Contact: Bjorn Carey
bccarey@stanford.edu
207-749-8698
Stanford University

Showing releases 51-75 out of 78.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>