Contacts:

Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
303-228-8406 (Denver Press Center, March 21-25)
202-872-6042(D.C. Office)

Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
k_cottingham@acs.org
303-228-8406 (Denver Press Center, March 21-25)
301-775-8455 (Cell)

The ACS Office of Public Affairs will provide a full range of media resources to assist in your coverage of the event, whether onsite or from your home base. There will be press releases and press conferences on abstracts chosen from nearly 11,000 scientific papers.

News media covering the Denver meeting from their home bases can join live news briefings and ask questions online via YouTube streaming webcasts at: http://bit.ly/ACSLiveDenver.  Anyone can view the press conferences, but to chat, you must first sign in with a Google account. The conferences will take place all day starting on Monday, March 23, at 8:30 a.m. MDT and Tuesday, March 24. They will end at about noon MDT on Wednesday, March 25.

Modern chemistry may be the most multi-disciplinary science, and the Denver meeting promises to include newsworthy topics spanning science's horizons. Thousands of scientists and others from around the world are expected to attend.

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 158,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 29.

[ 1 | 2 ]

Research News Release

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Novel plastic could spur new green energy applications, 'artificial muscles'
A plastic used in filters and tubing has an unusual trait: It can produce electricity when pulled or pressed. This ability has been used in small ways, but now researchers are coaxing fibers of it to make even more electricity for a wider range of applications from green energy to 'artificial muscles.' They will report progress on a novel form of this plastic at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Food additive could serve as a safer, more environmentally friendly antifreeze
The sweet taste and smell of antifreeze tempts children and animals to drink the poisonous substance, resulting in thousands of accidental poisonings in the United States every year. But today researchers will describe a new, nontoxic product based on a common food additive that could address this health issue and help the environment at the same time. The presentation will take place here at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Algae from clogged waterways could serve as biofuels and fertilizer
Water-borne algal blooms from farm fertilizer runoff can destroy aquatic life and clog rivers and lakes, but scientists will report today that they are working on a way to clean up these environmental scourges and turn them into useful products. The algae could serve as a feedstock for biofuels, and the feedstock leftovers could be recycled into fertilizer. The presentation will take place at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Fat turns from diabetes foe to potential treatment
A new weapon in the war against type 2 diabetes is coming in an unexpected form: fat. Researchers have discovered a new class of potentially therapeutic lipids, called FAHFAs, that are at low levels in people with insulin resistance, a risk factor for diabetes. FAHFAs improved glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in diabetic mice. The team will describe their approach at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
More flavorful, healthful chocolate could be on its way
Chocolate has many health benefits -- it can potentially lower blood pressure and cholesterol and reduce stroke risk. But just as connoisseurs thought it couldn't get any better, there's this tasty new tidbit: researchers have found a way to make the treat even more nutritious -- and sweeter. They will describe their research here today at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Looking to space to quantify natural gas leaks on Earth
Increasing natural gas production could provide a bridge to a lower carbon future. However, methane that is leaked into the atmosphere from this process could speed global warming and climate change. And there is controversy over just how much methane is lost. Researchers today will present new methods to determine methane's leakage rate and problems inherent in discovering and assessing leakage at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
New low-calorie rice could help cut rising obesity rates
Scientists have developed a new, simple way to cook rice that could cut the number of calories absorbed by the body by more than half, potentially reducing obesity rates, which is especially important in countries where the food is a staple. The presentation will take place in Denver at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Sewage -- yes, poop -- could be a source of valuable metals and critical elements
Poop could be a goldmine -- literally. Surprisingly, treated solid waste contains gold, silver and other metals, as well as rare elements such as palladium and vanadium that are used in electronics and alloys. Researchers will describe their efforts to identify and recover the metals at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Kavli Lecture: Mining the secrets of carbohydrates for new leads on antibiotics (Video)
Laura Kiessling, Ph.D., will present new findings that could exploit differences between human and microbial carbohydrates to fight infections during today's 'The Fred Kavli Innovations in Chemistry Lecture' at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Popular artificial sweetener could lead to new treatments for aggressive cancers
Saccharin, the artificial sweetener that is the main ingredient in Sweet 'N Low, Sweet Twin and Necta, could do far more than just keep our waistlines trim. This popular sugar substitute could potentially lead to the development of drugs capable of combating aggressive, difficult-to-treat cancers with fewer side effects. They will present their work today at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Kavli Lecture: Mimicking nature's chemistry to solve global environmental problems
Theodore Betley, Ph.D., will present his pioneering work in catalysis, which could help harness greenhouse gases, during today's 'The Kavli Foundation Emerging Leader in Chemistry Lecture' at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Legalizing marijuana and the new science of weed (video)
More than a year into Colorado's experiment legalizing marijuana, labs testing the plants are able for the first time to take stock of the drug's potency and contaminants -- and openly paint a picture of what's in today's weed. At the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, one such lab will present trends -- and some surprises -- that its preliminary testing has revealed about the marijuana now on the market.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Squid-inspired 'invisibility stickers' could help soldiers evade detection in the dark
Squid are the ultimate camouflage artists, blending flawlessly into their backgrounds so that unsuspecting prey can't detect them. Using a protein that's key to this process, scientists have designed 'invisibility stickers' that could one day help soldiers disguise themselves, even when sought by enemies with tough-to-fool infrared cameras. They present their work today at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Air pollutants could boost potency of common airborne allergens
A pair of air pollutants linked to climate change could also be major contributors to the unparalleled rise in the number of people sneezing, sniffling and wheezing during allergy season. The gases, nitrogen dioxide and ground-level ozone, appear to provoke chemical changes in certain airborne allergens that may increase their potency. That, in combination with changes in global climate could help explain why allergies are becoming more common.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Turning packing peanuts into energy-storing battery components (video)
One person's trash literally could become another's high-tech treasure, according to researchers who have developed a way to turn discarded packing peanuts into components for rechargeable batteries that could outperform the ones we use currently. They will report on the process for the first time today at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Chlorine use in sewage treatment could promote antibiotic resistance
Chlorine, a disinfectant used in most wastewater treatment plants, may be failing to eliminate pharmaceuticals from wastes. As a result, trace levels get discharged from the treatment plants into waterways. Now, scientists are reporting that chlorine treatment may encourage the formation of new, unknown antibiotics that could enter the environment, potentially contributing to the problem of antibiotic resistance. They will present the research at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
A molecule from plants and trees could make our roads and roofs 'greener'
Construction crews may someday use a plant molecule called lignin in their asphalt and sealant mixtures to help roads and roofs hold up better under various weather conditions and make them more environmentally friendly. The research will be presented today at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Opossum-based antidote to poisonous snake bites could save thousands of lives
Scientists will report in a presentation today that they have turned to the opossum to develop a promising new and inexpensive antidote for poisonous snake bites. They predict it could save thousands of lives worldwide without the side effects of current treatments. The presentation will take place here at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Vitamin D may keep low-grade prostate cancer from becoming aggressive
Taking vitamin D supplements could slow or even reverse the progression of less aggressive, or low-grade, prostate tumors without the need for surgery or radiation, a scientist will report today at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Special microbes make anti-obesity molecule in the gut
Microbes may just be the next diet craze. Researchers have programmed bacteria to generate a molecule that, through normal metabolism, becomes a hunger-suppressing lipid. Mice that drank water laced with the programmed bacteria ate less, had lower body fat and staved off diabetes -- even when fed a high-fat diet -- offering a potential weight-loss strategy for humans. The team will describe their approach at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
New lead against HIV could finally hobble the virus's edge
Since HIV emerged in the '80s, drug 'cocktails' transformed the deadly disease into a manageable one. But the virus is adept at developing resistance to drugs, and treatment regimens require tweaking that can be costly. Now scientists at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society are announcing new progress toward affordable drugs that could potentially thwart the virus's ability to resist them.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Award Announcement

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Dasgupta receives American Chemical Society's J. Calvin Giddings Award
Purnendu 'Sandy' Dasgupta, the Jenkins Garrett Professor of Chemistry at the University of Texas at Arlington, has received the 2015 American Chemical Society Division of Analytical Chemistry J. Calvin Giddings Award for Excellence in Education.

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Meeting Announcement

Public Release: 22-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
ACS recognizes the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons
The Board of Directors of the American Chemical Society will recognize the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons for its tireless efforts in promoting the peaceful use of chemistry at the Society's 249th National Meeting & Exposition.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Highlights for American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition March 22-26, Denver
Journalists registering for the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 249th National Meeting & Exposition this spring will have a wealth of new scientific information available for their news stories. Nearly 11,000 presentations are planned on a wide range of topics from health to the environment. The meeting, one of the largest scientific conferences of the year, will be held March 22-26 in Denver.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
220-287-26042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
Press registration opens for 2015 spring national meeting of the American Chemical Society
Journalists may now apply for press credentials for the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 249th National Meeting & Exposition. One of the largest scientific conferences of the year, it will be held March 22-26 in Denver.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Showing releases 1-25 out of 29.

[ 1 | 2 ]


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