Contacts:

Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
215-418-2357 (Philadelphia Press Center, Aug. 21-24)
202-872-6042 (D.C. Office)

Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
k_cottingham@acs.org
215-418-2357 (Philadelphia Press Center, Aug. 21-24)
301-775-8455 (Cell)

The ACS Office of Public Affairs will provide a full range of media resources to assist in your coverage of the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the ACS, whether onsite or from your home base. There will be press releases and press conferences on abstracts chosen from more than 9,000 scientific papers.

News media covering the Philadelphia meeting can join live news briefings and ask questions online via YouTube streaming webcasts at: http://bit.ly/ACSlivephiladelphia. Anyone can view the press conferences, but to chat, you must first sign in with a Google account. The conferences will take place Monday, Aug. 22, through Wednesday, Aug. 24.

Modern chemistry may be the most multi-disciplinary science, and the Philadelphia meeting promises to include newsworthy topics spanning science's horizons. Thousands of scientists and others from around the world are expected to attend.

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

 

 

 

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-23 out of 23.

[ 1 ]

Research News Release

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Insulin pill could make diabetes treatment 'ouchless'
Millions of Americans with diabetes have to inject themselves regularly with insulin to manage their blood-sugar levels. But scientists are developing a new way of administering the medicine orally with tiny vesicles that can deliver insulin where it needs to go without a shot. Today, they share their in vivo testing results at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
ACS Central Science
New electrical energy storage material shows its power
A new material developed by Northwestern University chemist William Dichtel and his team could one day speed up the charging process of electric cars and help increase their driving range. The modified covalent organic framework (COF) material combines the ability to store large amounts of electrical energy or charge, like a battery, and the ability to charge and discharge rapidly, like a supercapacitor, into one device. The researchers built a prototype device capable of powering an LED for 30 seconds.
National Science Foundation, Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, US Army Research Office

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Selecting the right house plant could improve indoor air (animation)
Indoor air pollution is an important environmental threat to human health, leading to symptoms of 'sick building syndrome.' But researchers report that surrounding oneself with certain house plants could combat the potentially harmful effects of volatile organic compounds, a main category of these pollutants. The researchers present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Battery you can swallow could enable future ingestible medical devices
Non-toxic, edible batteries could one day power ingestible devices for diagnosing and treating disease. One team reports new progress toward that goal with their batteries made with melanin pigments, naturally found in the skin, hair and eyes. The researchers present their work today at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Stretchy supercapacitors power wearable electronics
A future of soft robots or smart T-shirts may depend on the development of stretchy power sources. But traditional batteries are thick and rigid -- not ideal properties for materials that would be used in tiny malleable devices. In a step toward wearable electronics, a team of researchers has produced a stretchy micro-supercapacitor using ribbons of graphene. The researchers present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
New device could help improve taste of foods low in fat, sugar and salt
Scientists may be closing in on a way to let consumers savor the sweet taste of cake, cookies and other delights without the sugar rush. They have isolated several natural aromatic molecules that could be used to trick our brains into believing that desserts and other foods contain more fat, sugar or salt than they actually do. The researchers present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Simple new test could improve diagnosis of tuberculosis in developing nations
The current test used in developing nations to diagnose tuberculosis is error-prone, complicated and slow. Furthermore, patients in these resource-limited areas can't easily travel back to a clinic at a later date to get their results. Chemists have now developed a simpler, faster and more accurate test. Trials of the new test began in Africa in June. The researchers will present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Nanoparticles that speed blood clotting may someday save lives
Whether severe trauma occurs on the battlefield or the highway, saving lives often comes down to stopping the bleeding as quickly as possible. Now, researchers have developed nanoparticles that congregate wherever injury occurs in the body to help it form blood clots, and they've validated these particles in test tubes and in vivo. The researchers present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
After the heart attack: Injectable gels could prevent future heart failure (video)
During a heart attack, clots or narrowed arteries block blood flow, harming or killing cells in the heart. But damage doesn't end after the crushing pain subsides. Instead, the heart's walls thin out, the organ becomes enlarged, and scar tissue forms. These changes can cause heart failure. Scientists now report they have developed injectable gels to prevent this damage. They present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Watching thoughts -- and addiction -- form in the brain
In a classic experiment, Ivan Pavlov conditioned dogs to salivate at the ringing of a bell. Now, scientists can see what happens in the brains of live animals during this experiment with a new technique. The approach could lead to a greater understanding of how we learn and develop addictions. Scientists will present this study and others related to the BRAIN Initiative at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Reducing tire waste by using completely degradable, synthetic rubber
Scrap tires pile up in landfills, have fed enormous toxic fires, harbor pests and get burned for fuel. Scientists trying to rid us of this scourge have developed a new way to make synthetic rubber. Once this material is discarded, it can be easily degraded back to its building blocks and reused in new tires and other products. They will present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
How cars could meet future emissions standards: Focus on cold starts
Car emissions is a high-stakes issue, as last year's Volkswagen scandal demonstrated. Wrongdoing aside, how are automakers going to realistically meet future, tougher emissions requirements to reduce their impact on the climate? Researchers report today that a vehicle's cold start -- at least in gasoline-powered cars -- is the best target for future design changes. The researchers present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Citrus fruits could help prevent obesity-related heart disease, liver disease, diabetes
Oranges and other citrus fruits are good for you -- they contain plenty of vitamins and substances, such as antioxidants, that can help keep you healthy. Now a group of researchers reports that these fruits also help prevent harmful effects of obesity in mice fed a Western-style, high-fat diet. The researchers are presenting their work today at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Paper-based device spots falsified or degraded medications (video)
The developing world is awash in substandard, degraded or falsified medications, which can either directly harm users or deprive them of needed treatment. And with internet sales of medications on the rise, people everywhere are increasingly at risk. So, a team of researchers has developed a simple, inexpensive paper-based device to screen suspicious medications. They present their work today at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Edible food packaging made from milk proteins (video)
Most foods at the grocery store come wrapped in plastic packaging. Not only does this create a lot of non-recyclable, non-biodegradable waste, but thin plastic films are not great at preventing spoilage. Scientists are now developing a packaging film made of milk proteins that addresses these issues -- and it is even edible. The researchers present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Fungi recycle rechargeable lithium-ion batteries
Rechargeable batteries in smartphones, cars and tablets don't last forever. Old batteries often wind up in landfills or incinerators, potentially harming the environment. And valuable materials remain locked inside. Now, a team of researchers is turning to fungi to drive an environmentally friendly recycling process to extract cobalt and lithium from tons of waste batteries. The researchers present their work today at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Stopping scars before they form
Most people start racking up scars from an early age with scraped knees and elbows. While many of these fade over time, more severe types such as keloids and scars from burns are largely untreatable, and can carry the stigma of disfigurement. Now scientists are developing new compounds that could stop scars from forming in the first place. The researchers present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Squid, jellyfish and wrinkled skin inspire materials for anti-glare screens and encryption
What do squid and jellyfish skin have in common with human skin? All three have inspired a team of chemists to create materials that change color or texture in response to variations in their surroundings. These materials could be used for encrypting secret messages, creating anti-glare surfaces, or detecting moisture or damage, they say. The researchers are presenting their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 19-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
New study challenges assumption of asbestos' ability to move in soil
A new study led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego scientist Jane Willenbring challenges the long-held belief that asbestos fibers cannot move through soil. The findings have important implications for current remediation strategies aimed at capping asbestos-laden soils to prevent human exposure of the cancer-causing material.
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Award Announcement

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Lehigh chemist recognized for work on immunotherapy to fight bacteria
Marcos Pires, assistant professor of chemistry at Lehigh University, is pioneering a promising alternative to antibiotics that would allow the immune system do the dirty work. He will be recognized for his work on immunotherapy to fight bacteria with an inaugural ACS Infectious Diseases Young Investigator's Award acknowledging 'outstanding early career researchers.' Recipients will be honored at a symposium on Tuesday, Aug. 23 in Philadelphia held in conjunction with the ACS Fall National Meeting.

Contact: Lori Friedman
lof214@lehigh.edu
610-758-3224
Lehigh University

Meeting Announcement

Public Release: 21-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Chemical & Engineering News celebrates 'The Talented 12': Young science trailblazers
Chemical & Engineering News magazine is blowing the cover of 12 'secret agents' working to save us from the world's most intractable science problems. At an event today at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society and in its feature issue, C&EN will reveal the identifies of 'The Talented 12,' a group of young, rising stars in chemistry.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 4-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
American Chemical Society national meeting features presidential events
American Chemical Society (ACS) President Donna J. Nelson, Ph.D., will emphasize her theme of buildŽing communities in chemistry at the ACS 252nd National Meeting & Exposition, Aug. 21 to 25, in Philadelphia. The presidential events, which will also include other subjects of broad interest, will be held at the Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott. All times listed are in EDT.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Jun-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Highlights for American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition Aug. 21-25
Journalists registering for the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 252nd National Meeting & Exposition will have an abundance of new scientific information available for their news stories. More than 9,000 presentations are planned on a wide range of topics from health to the environment. The meeting, one of the largest scientific conferences of the year, will be held August 21-25 in Philadelphia.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Press Conference

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society's 252nd National Meeting & Exposition press conference schedule
Attend press conferences live -- online at http://bit.ly/ACSlivephiladelphia or in person -- at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. Press conferences will be held Monday, Aug. 22, through Wednesday, Aug. 24. Below is the schedule, which will be updated as needed.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Showing releases 1-23 out of 23.

[ 1 ]


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