Contacts:

Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
619-525-6215 (San Diego Press Center, March 13-16)
202-872-6042 (D.C. Office)

Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
k_cottingham@acs.org
619-525-6215 (San Diego Press Center, March 13-16)
301-775-8455 (Cell)

The ACS Office of Public Affairs will provide a full range of media resources to assist in your coverage of the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the ACS, whether onsite or from your home base. There will be press releases and press conferences on abstracts chosen from more than 12,500 scientific papers.

News media covering the San Diego meeting can join live news briefings and ask questions online via YouTube streaming webcasts at: http://bit.ly/ACSliveSanDiego. Anyone can view the press conferences, but to chat, you must first sign in with a Google account. The conferences will take place Monday, March 14, through Wednesday, March 16.

Modern chemistry may be the most multi-disciplinary science, and the San Diego meeting promises to include newsworthy topics spanning science's horizons. Thousands of scientists and others from around the world are expected to attend.

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 158,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

 

 

 

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 27.

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Research News Release

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Generating electricity with tomato waste
A team of scientists is exploring an unusual source of electricity -- damaged tomatoes that are unsuitable for sale at the grocery store. Their pilot project involves a biological-based fuel cell that uses tomato waste left over from harvests in Florida. The researchers present their work at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
3-D printing could one day help fix damaged cartilage in knees, noses and ears (video)
Athletes, the elderly and others who suffer from injuries and arthritis can lose cartilage and experience a lot of pain. Researchers are now reporting, however, that they have found a way to produce cartilage tissue by 3-D bioprinting an ink containing human cells, and they have successfully tested it in an in vivo mouse model. The researchers present their work at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
New material could make aircraft deicers a thing of the past
Instead of applying a deicing agent to strip ice from an aircraft's wings before winter takeoffs, airport personnel could in the future just watch chunks slide right off. Scientists report they have developed a slippery substance that is secreted from a film on the wing's surface as temperatures drop below freezing and retreats back into the film as temperatures rise. Researchers will present their findings at the 251st National Meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Cellular 'backpacks' could treat disease while minimizing side effects
Drug therapies for many conditions end up treating the whole body even when only one part needs it. But this generalized approach can hurt healthy cells, causing nasty side effects. To send drugs to specific disease locations, researchers developed cellular 'backpacks' that are designed to carry a therapeutic cargo only to inflamed disease sites. The researchers present their work at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
New technique could more accurately measure cannabinoid dosage in marijuana munchies
As more states decriminalize recreational use of marijuana and expand its medical applications, concern is growing about inaccurate dosage information listed on edible products. So, scientists have developed a technique that can more precisely measure cannabis compounds in gummy bears, chocolates and other foods made with marijuana. They say this new method could help ensure product safety. The researchers present their research today at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
How a pill could improve breast cancer diagnoses
The ongoing debate about breast cancer diagnostics has left many women confused -- particularly over what age they should get mammograms and who needs treatment. An issue with current methods is that they often identify lumps but cannot conclusively pinpoint which ones are cancerous. So, researchers have developed a pill that could improve imaging, lighting up only cancerous tumors. They report their work at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Insect wings inspire antibacterial surfaces for corneal transplants, other medical devices
Someday, cicadas and dragonflies might save your sight. The key to this power lies in their wings, which are coated with a forest of tiny pointed pillars that impale and kill bacterial cells unlucky enough to land on them. Now, scientists report they have replicated these antibacterial nanopillars on synthetic polymers that are being developed to restore vision. The researchers present their work at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Eggshell nanoparticles could lead to expanded use of bioplastic in packaging materials
Placed on end, eggshells are as strong as the arches supporting ancient Roman aquaducts. Yet they readily crack in the middle, and once that happens, we discard them. But now scientists report that adding tiny shards of eggshell to bioplastic could create a first-of-its-kind biodegradable packaging material that bends but does not easily break. The researchers present their work today at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 14-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Spongy material helps repair the spine (video)
Remember those colorful 'grow capsules' that blossom into animal-shaped sponges in water? Using a similar idea, scientists have developed biodegradable polymer grafts that, when surgically placed in damaged vertebrae, should grow to be just the right size and shape to fix the spinal column. The researchers present their work at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 14-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Artificial 'nose' sniffs out pollution to protect Disney art on international tour
When original drawings and sketches from Walt Disney Animation Studio's more than 90-year history traveled internationally last summer, conservators had the opportunity to monitor the artwork with a new state-of-the-art sensor. A team of researchers developed a super-sensitive artificial 'nose,' customized specifically to detect pollutants before they could irreversibly damage the artwork. The researchers report on their efforts at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 13-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Blueberries, the well-known 'super fruit,' could help fight Alzheimer's
The blueberry, already labeled a 'super fruit' for its power to potentially lower the risk of heart disease and cancer, also could be another weapon in the war against Alzheimer's disease. The researchers present their work today at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 13-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
A step toward a birth control pill for men
Women can choose from many birth control methods, including numerous oral contraceptives, but there's never been an analogous pill for men. That's not for lack of trying: For many years, scientists have attempted to formulate a male pill. Finally, a group of researchers has taken a step toward that goal by tweaking some experimental compounds that show promise. The researchers present their work at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 13-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Tying lipstick smears from crime scenes to specific brands (video)
It's a common TV show trope: detectives find a lipstick mark at a crime scene, they send a sample to the lab, and suddenly they have a lead. Real-life analyses aren't nearly as fast or straightforward, but scientists are developing a better method for lifting lipstick samples and analyzing them. The researchers present their work at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 13-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Getting closer to using beer hops to fight disease
Hops, those little cone-shaped buds that give beer its bitter flavor, pack a surprisingly healthful punch. They are widely studied for their ability to halt bacterial growth and disease. Now, researchers report that they are close to synthesizing the healthful hops compounds in the lab, which could help scientists more easily create medicines from these compounds. The researchers present their work at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 13-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Desert cactus purifies contaminated water for aquaculture, drinking and more (video)
Farm-grown fish are an important source of food with significant and worldwide societal and economic benefits, but the fish that come from these recirculating systems can have unpleasant tastes and odors. To clean contaminated water for farmed fish, drinking and other uses, scientists are now turning to an unlikely source -- the mucilage or inner 'guts' of cacti. Researchers will be presenting their latest findings at the 251st National Meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 13-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Nanomotors could help electronics fix themselves
As electronics grow ever more intricate, so must the tools required to fix them. Anticipating this challenge, scientists turned to the body's immune system for inspiration and have now built self-propelled nanomotors that can seek out and repair tiny scratches to electronic systems. They could one day lead to flexible batteries, electrodes, solar cells and other gadgets that heal themselves. The researchers present their work at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 13-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
DNA 'origami' could help build faster, cheaper computer chips
Electronics manufacturers constantly hunt for ways to make faster, cheaper computer chips, often by cutting production costs or by shrinking component sizes. Now, researchers report that DNA, the genetic material of life, might help accomplish this goal when it is formed into specific shapes through a process reminiscent of the ancient art of paper folding.The researchers present their work at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 13-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
A nanoparticle does double duty, imaging and treating atherosclerosis
Atherosclerosis, a disease in which plaque builds up inside arteries, is a prolific and invisible killer, but it may soon lose its ability to hide in the body. Scientists have developed a nanoparticle that mimics high-density lipoprotein. It can simultaneously light up and treat atherosclerotic plaques that clog arteries, which could someday help prevent heart attacks and strokes. The researchers present their findings at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Plenaries at American Chemical Society meeting will focus on computers in chemistry
Scientists, in four plenary talks, will explore a variety of subjects related to the 'Computers in Chemistry' theme of the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. The meeting will take place March 13-17 in San Diego.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Kavli Lectures: Computers for drug discovery, clean energy
Harnessing the power of computers to find new medicines and to explore the viability of alternative clean energy strategies will be the topics of a pair of Kavli Lectures at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. The meeting will take place March 13-17 in San Diego.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Award Announcement

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Akron polymer engineer receives prestigious Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings
Dr. Mark Soucek, a professor in the Department of Polymer Engineering at The University of Akron, will be awarded the prestigious American Chemical Society's Division of Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE) Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings. Dr. Mark Soucek is being honored for his pioneering work in several areas including drying oil, alkyd, and reactive diluent technologies. His support and dedication is also evident in the students he trained in cutting-edge coatings technology, who have become new leaders in the field.

Contact: Lisa Craig
lmc91@uakron.edu
330-972-7429
University of Akron

Meeting Announcement

Public Release: 14-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
How science can help tackle global water scarcity
Millions of people around the world lack access to clean drinking water, and experts predict the situation could get worse unless new solutions are implemented. A panel of scientists addressing the issue outlines strategies that could help curb this humanitarian crisis in a new white paper, "Chemistry and Water: Challenges and Solutions in a Changing World." They discuss the report today at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
ACS national meeting online press conferences begin Monday, March 14
All press conferences from the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 251st National Meeting & Exposition in San Diego will be accessible via YouTube streaming webcasts starting on Monday, March 14, 2016 at 9 a.m. PDT. The link is http://bit.ly/ACSliveSanDiego.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 28-Jan-2016
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Highlights for 2016 national meeting of world's largest scientific society
Journalists registering for the American Chemical Society's 251st National Meeting & Exposition this spring will have a wealth of new scientific information available for their news stories. More than 12,500 presentations are planned on a wide range of topics from health to the environment. The meeting, one of the largest scientific conferences of the year, will be held March 13-17 in San Diego.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 15-Dec-2015
American Chemical Society 251st National Meeting & Exposition
Press registration opens for 2016 spring national meeting of the American Chemical Society
Journalists may now apply for press credentials for the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 251st National Meeting & Exposition, one of the largest scientific conferences of the year. It will be held March 13-17 in San Diego.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Showing releases 1-25 out of 27.

[ 1 | 2 ]


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