Books

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 51.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 > >>

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
Borderscaping helps understand social change
'Borders are more than just lines on a map; they are constructions and concepts that are constantly re-negotiated and maintained. Moreover, borders involve habits, attitudes and institutions that are used to create and maintain distinctions between 'us' and 'them',' says researcher Jussi Laine of the University of Eastern Finland, summing up the ideas of the recently published book 'Borderscaping: Imaginations and Practices of Border Making.'

Contact: Jussi Laine
jussi.laine@uef.fi
358-504-338-252
University of Eastern Finland

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
Social media technology rather than anonymity is the problem
Problems of anti-social behavior, privacy, and free speech on social media are not caused by anonymity but instead result from the way technology changes our presence.

Contact: Martin Herrema
M.J.Herrema@kent.ac.uk
University of Kent

Public Release: 20-Jan-2016
Young Muslim women from slums impact India's globalization: York University study
In her book, 'Young Muslim Women in India: Bollywood, Identity and Changing Youth Culture' (published by Routledge), York University Professor Kabita Chakraborty explores how they contribute to and are impacted by the changing youth culture in India. The children's Sstudies researcher spent nearly two years in the large city of Kolkata, West Bengal, as part of field research.

Contact: Gloria Suhasini
suhasini@yorku.ca
416-736-2100 x22094
York University

Public Release: 19-Jan-2016
New book on how to save forest elephants published as extinction crisis deepens
A newly published book focused on promoting research and conservation methods and strategies for the African forest elephant arrives at a crucial time for this species, which is being decimated by poaching, habitat loss, and other threats, according to authors from the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 19-Jan-2016
'Angels without Borders'
Angel investment is early-stage private investment that has high risks. 'Angel investors' provide small amounts of capital ($100,000-$3,000,000) to early stage, high-risk ventures. In recent years, they have not only grown in numbers and sophistication, they have garnered the attention of larger investors and governments throughout the world who are interested in the phenomenal power of start-ups to bring innovative products to consumers, create jobs and economic value, and sustain macroeconomic growth.

Contact: Amanda Yun
heyun@wspc.com.sg
646-65775 x446
World Scientific

Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
Caves and karst: Worlds within worlds across time
Karst aquifers are the world's most productive yet vulnerable groundwater systems, serving as the sole or primary water supply for more than one billion people worldwide. Karst systems have evolved dynamically across time, reflecting changes in climate and regional tectonism and the subsequent crustal scale hydrologic responses invoked by these processes. Caves are widely recognized as important geological features and, with karst, as distinctive and significant geologic systems covering approximately 20 percent of Earth's land surface.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
An invaluable guide to navigating the new revolution in health care
David Agus, M.D., the bestselling author of 'The End of Illness and A Short Guide to a Long Life,' has released 'The Lucky Years,' helping people navigate a new world of healthcare wherein you can live a much longer, much more enjoyable life than ever before.

Contact: Mary Dacuma
mary.dacuma@med.usc.edu
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 12-Jan-2016
New book highlights research in emerging field of video bioinformatics
The first book to review the emerging interdisciplinary field of video bioinformatics was published in December by Springer. Titled 'Video Bioinformatics: From Live Imaging to Knowledge,' the book was edited by Bir Bhanu, distinguished professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of California, Riverside, and Prue Talbot, professor of cell biology and director of the Stem Cell Center and Core at UCR.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah Nightingale
sarah.nightingale@ucr.edu
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 11-Jan-2016
Are workarounds ethical in health care systems?
'There is more than one 'clean hands' problem in health care work,' writes Nancy Berlinger, a Hastings Center research scholar and a specialist in health care ethics, at the opening of her new book, 'Are Workarounds Ethical? Managing Moral Problems in Health Care Systems,' published by Oxford University Press.

Contact: Susan Gilbert
gilberts@thehastingscenter.org
845-424-4040 x244
The Hastings Center

Public Release: 11-Jan-2016
When parents act badly: Book explores 'parental alienation'
In a new book, Colorado State University social scientists are shedding light on the understudied problem of parental alienation.

Contact: Anne Ju Manning
anne.manning@colostate.edu
970-491-7099
Colorado State University

Public Release: 8-Jan-2016
A medical pop-up book from the 17th century
Columbia University has digitized an important anatomical flap book -- an early attempt to represent the three dimensionality of the human body in the two dimensional format of the book.

Contact: Lucky Tran
lucky.tran@columbia.edu
212-305-3689
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 8-Jan-2016
Large meteorite impacts and planetary evolution
Impact cratering is one of the most fundamental geological processes. On many planets, impact craters are the dominant geological landform. On Earth, erosion, plate tectonics, and volcanic resurfacing continually destroy the impact cratering record, but even here, the geological, biological, and environmental effects of impact cratering are apparent.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 7-Jan-2016
Earth-science pioneer Don L. Anderson honored
This new GSA Special Paper is a memorial to Don L. Anderson, former director of the Seismological Laboratory at Caltech, recipient of the Crafoord Prize in Geosciences from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, the US National Medal of Science, and numerous other awards. A geophysicist extraordinaire, he contributed much to our understanding of the structure and dynamics of the interior of Earth.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 5-Jan-2016
A new GMO technology could prevent human disease or make designer babies
A new genetic modification technology called CRISPR has revolutionized many aspects of science. It has catalyzed novel research and raises the exciting possibility of preventing genetic diseases. But it also could be used to create people who are GMOs via designer babies, raising difficult issues such as eugenics. How do we balance the power of CRISPR to do amazing positive things with risks from more controversial applications?

Contact: Amanda Yun
heyun@wspc.com.sg
646-65775 x446
World Scientific

Public Release: 5-Jan-2016
Energy: Sources, Utilization, Legislation, Sustainability, Illinois as Model State
Energy was written to educate its readers about all aspects of energy -- including energy sources, energy utilization, and legislation related to better use and the move towards renewable energy and sustainability. This book, serves as an educational guide to students of energy, as well as a road map for energy planners and policy makers, energy-related engineers and scientists, and citizens and community leaders, who are concerned about energy in general.

Contact: Amanda Yun
heyun@wspc.com.sg
646-65775 x446
World Scientific

Public Release: 4-Jan-2016
New guide highlights the properties of diverse drug targets
The new Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/2016 provides a valuable and unique overview of the key properties of more than 1,700 human drug targets, focusing on those exploited currently in the clinic or with future therapeutic potential.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 4-Jan-2016
Ben-Gurion U. researcher reveals that self-criticism can be lethal in new book
Throughout the book, Professor Shahar identifies the mechanisms through which self-criticism confers vulnerability to psychopathology. Self-criticism propels people to involve themselves in stressful events such as rejection by others, relationship breakups and professional failures to avoid engaging in the positive life experiences they feel they do not deserve. This form of dangerous self-criticism is psychologically different from the transient 'fish for compliments' type, which he argues is not pathological, unlike its more harmful counterpart.

Contact: Andrew Lavin
andrewlavin@alavin.com
516-944-4486
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Public Release: 28-Dec-2015
The entire history of the universe for curious minds of all education levels
Astrophysicist and award-winning writer Ethan Siegel recounts the entire development of modern cosmology, including relativity, the expanding universe, stellar nucleosynthesis, the Big Bang, as well as dark matter, dark energy, inflation and baryogenesis in a beautifully illustrated, equation-free book designed to revolutionize astronomy education for experts and non-experts alike.

Contact: Amanda Yun
heyun@wspc.com.sg
646-65775 x446
World Scientific

Public Release: 23-Dec-2015
Medical anthropologist explores reproductive travel in 'Fertility Holidays'
New research from Dr. Amy Speier, assistant professor of medical anthropology at The University of Texas at Arlington, explores the growing number of North Americans traveling to Central Europe for low-cost in vitro fertilization treatments to create a particular kind of family -- one with blonde-haired, blue-eyed babies.

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Unusual central Nevada geologic terranes
This new Special Paper from The Geological Society of America is a product of nearly 25 years of geologic investigations. It is a detailed exposition of two small areas, both less than 25 km east of the Mississippian Roberts Mountains allochthon, but each displaying a different, unique geologic terrane, previously undocumented in Nevada and perhaps in North America.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
Understanding the wicked problem of climate change
Frank Incropera the H. Clifford and Evelyn A. Brossey Professor Emeritus of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and former Matthew H. McCloskey Dean of the University of Notre Dame's College of Engineering, is the author of a new book titled 'Climate Change: A Wicked Problem.'

Contact: Frank Incropera
Frank.Incropera.1@nd.edu
574-631-3095
University of Notre Dame

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
New book on 'Aging: The Longevity Dividend' from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
'Aging: The Longevity Dividend' from CSHLPress, examines the biological basis of aging, strategies that may extend health span, and the societal implications of delayed aging. Contributors discuss genetic variants that accelerate or protect against aging, biochemical pathways that modulate longevity (e.g., mTOR), biological consequences of aging (e.g., decline in stem cell function), and various animal models used to study aging processes. They emphasize that age-delaying interventions will yield greater health and vitality than disease-specific treatments.

Contact: Robert Redmond
rredmond@cshl.edu
516-422-4101
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
From 9/11 to 7/7 and beyond: Islamist terrorism in the US and UK explained
Based on a sample of nearly 800 American and British jihadists, this book provides an extensive yet lucid analysis of one of the greatest security concerns facing the world today. From the first proponents of 'global jihad' to the recent wave of 'foreign fighters' flocking to the so-called 'Islamic State,' 'Home-Grown Jihad' sheds new light on who the terrorists are, how and why they do what they do, and how security services are tracking them.

Contact: Jason Lim
cjlim@wspc.com.sg
646-65775 x247
World Scientific

Public Release: 15-Dec-2015
Molecules in small spaces are keys to applications in nanochemistry and molecular machines
This monograph traces the research of the past two decades on molecules confined to closed containers -- capsules -- barely large enough to accommodate them. The capsules are stabilized by hydrogen bonds; they self-assemble in organic solvents and function on the nanometer scale.
National Institutes of Health, Skaaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, 1000 Talents Program of China

Contact: Jason Lim
cjlim@wspc.com.sg
646-65775 x247
World Scientific

Public Release: 15-Dec-2015
Diseases that cause skin problems also can trigger serious neurological conditions
Diseases such as lupus that cause rashes and other skin problems also can trigger migraine headaches, strokes and other serious neurological conditions, according to an article in a new volume of the Handbook of Clinical Neurology.

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Showing releases 26-50 out of 51.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 > >>