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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
ESA Frontiers November preview
Connectivity cost calculations for conservation corridors, crop companions, jellyfish and human well-being and micromanaging microbes.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Global Change Biology
Dartmouth study finds restoring wetlands can lessen soil sinkage, greenhouse gas emissions
Restoring wetlands can help reduce or reverse soil subsidence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to research in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta by Dartmouth College researchers and their colleagues.

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Scientific Reports
Reef-builders with a sense of harmony
Cold-water corals of the species Lophelia pertusa are able to fuse skeletons of genetically distinct individuals. On dives with JAGO, a research submersible stationed at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, scientists from Scotland and Germany made the first-ever discovery of branches of different colors that had flawlessly merged. The ability to fuse supports the reef stability and thus contributes to the success of corals as reef-builders of the deep sea.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Does it help conservation to put a price on nature?
Assigning an economic value to the benefits which nature provides might not always promote the conservation of biodiversity, and in some cases may lead to species loss and conflict, argues a University of Cambridge researcher.

Contact: Sarah Collins
sarah.collins@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-233-32300
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
New research show that bats will hang out with their friends this Halloween
New research has shown that despite moving house frequently, bats choose to roost with the same social groups of 'friends.' The study, published today in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, found that different social groups roost in separate, though adjacent, parts of woodland. The findings have important implications for conservation. The research was carried out by scientists from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, the University of Exeter and the University of Oxford.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Barnaby Smith
bpgs@ceh.ac.uk
44-079-202-95384
Centre for Ecology & Hydrology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Science casts light on sex in the orchard
Persimmons are among the small club of plants with separate sexes -- individual trees are either male or female. Now scientists at the UC Davis and Kyoto University in Japan have discovered how sex is determined in a species of persimmon, potentially opening up new possibilities in plant breeding.
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, US Department of Energy, UC Davis Genome Center

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Bird Conservation International
Smithsonian scientist discovers populations of rare songbird in surprising new habitat
With only 90,000 breeding individuals sparsely distributed across 15 US states, the Swainson's warbler is a species of high conservation concern that, for decades, has left conservationists with little confidence that its populations would ever be fully secure. New research reveals that populations of Swainson's warbler are increasing in a surprising new habitat found mostly on private lands -- pine plantations on nearly 16 million hectares on the coastal plain from eastern Texas to southeastern Virginia.
Smithsonian Institution/Research Opportunities Fund, Smithsonian Institution/Alexander Wetmore Fund, US Fish and Wildlife Service

Contact: Kathryn Sabella
sabellak@si.edu
202-633-2950
Smithsonian

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
One hormone, 2 roles: Sugars differentiate seasonality and metabolism
Scientists at ITbM, Nagoya University and the University of Chicago have discovered the mechanism on how a single hormone manages to trigger two different functions, i.e. seasonal sensing and metabolism, without any cross activity.

Contact: Ayako Miyazaki
press@itbm.nagoya-u.ac.jp
81-527-894-999
Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM), Nagoya University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
European salamanders and newts vulnerable to fungal disease from Asia
A skin-eating fungal disease brought to Europe by humans now poses a major threat to native salamanders and newts, scientists have warned.
Ghent University, Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp, Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs

Contact: An Martel
An.Martel@UGent.be
32-496-831-161
Ghent University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Emerging disease could wipe out American, European salamanders
A fungal disease from Asia wiped out salamanders in parts of Europe and will likely reach the US through the international wildlife trade in Asian newts sold as pets, say US experts. In an Oct. 31 Science paper, an international team reports the fungus arose in Asia 30 million years ago and is lethal to many European and American newt species. It has not yet been found in North American wild amphibians.
Ghent University Special Research Fund, University of Maryland-Smithsonian Institution Seed Grant, Illinois Department of Natural Resources State Wildlife Grant, National Science Foundation.

Contact: Heather Dewar
hdewar@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Plump turtles swim better: First models of swimming animals
For the first time, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Florida Atlantic University, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have measured the forces that act on a swimming animal and the energy the animal must expend to move through the water.
Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund, UW Foundation

Contact: Warren Porter
wpporter@wisc.edu
608-262-1719
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Report: 93 percent of mining, oil & gas, logging, agriculture developments involve inhabited land
In an analysis of almost 73,000 concessions in eight tropical forested countries, more than 93 percent of these developments were found to involve land inhabited by Indigenous Peoples and local communities. According to the research, conducted by The Munden Project, the total amount of land handed over by governments to the private sector for mining, logging, oil & gas drilling, and large-scale agriculture includes at least 40 percent of Peru and 30 percent of Indonesia.

Contact: Coimbra Sirica
csirica@burnesscommunications.com
Burness Communications

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
Why plants don't get sunburn
Plants rely on sunlight to make their food, but they also need protection from its harmful rays, just like humans do. Recently, scientists discovered a group of molecules in plants that shields them from sun damage. Now, in an article in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, one team reports on the mechanics of how these natural plant sunscreens work.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Smoke and haze over China
Smoke and haze hang over a large portion of eastern China in this image captured by the Aqua satellite on Oct. 29, 2014.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
BGI Tech and Hebei Agricultural University complete the genome sequencing of the jujube tree
BGI Tech and Hebei Agricultural University jointly announced the complete, high quality sequencing of the jujube genome. Jujube is the most economically important member of the Rhamnaceae family, and the jujube genome is particularly difficult to sequence due the high level of heterozygosity and other complicating factors. It is the first time that a genome in the Rhamnaceae, Buckthorn, family has been sequenced. This study has been recently published in Nature Communications.

Contact: Press Office
huwen@genomics.cn
BGI Shenzhen

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
British Journal of Nutrition
New scientific review reveals emerging and established health benefits of whole grain oats
According to a new, wide-reaching collection of scientific reviews published in the October 2014 supplement issue of the British Journal of Nutrition, oats may play an important role in improving satiety, diet quality and digestive, cardiovascular and general metabolic health. In the supplement, entitled 'Oats, More Than Just a Whole Grain,' scientists explore the oat from agriculture and sustainability to nutrition policy and opportunity and new insights in nutritional science that go beyond cardiovascular health.
Quaker Oats Co.

Contact: Korinne Leonardis
kleonardis@pollock-pr.com
212-941-1414
Pollock Communications

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
New frog discovered inhabiting I-95 corridor from Connecticut to North Carolina
More than a half century after claims that a new frog species existed in New York and New Jersey were dismissed, a Rutgers researcher and team of scientists have proven that the frog is living in wetlands from Connecticut to North Carolina and are naming it after the ecologist who first noticed it.

Contact: Robin Lally
rlally@ucm.rutgers.edu
732-932-0557
Rutgers University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
CHORI scientists identify key factor in relationship between diet, inflammation and cancer
A team of Children's Hospital and Research Center Oakland researchers has found that a category of lipids known as sphingolipids may be an important link in the relationship between diet, inflammation and cancer.
Chidlren's Hospital Oakland Research Institute

Contact: Melinda Krigel
mkrigel@mail.cho.org
510-428-3069
Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UC Davis scientists discover exact receptor for DEET that repels mosquitoes
The odorant receptor that makes DEET repellant to mosquitoes has been identified by a research team led by the University of California, Davis.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Pat Bailey
pjbailey@ucdavis.edu
530-752-9843
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Tea and citrus products could lower ovarian cancer risk, new UEA research finds
Tea and citrus fruits and juices are associated with a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer, according to new research from the University of East Anglia. The team found that those who consumed food and drinks high in flavonols -- found in tea, red wine, apples and grapes -- and flavanones -- found in citrus fruit and juices -- were less likely to develop the disease.

Contact: Laura Potts
laura.potts@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-93007
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Fish 'personality' linked to vulnerability to angling
Individual differences in moving activity in a novel environment are linked to individual differences in vulnerability to angling, according to an experimental study completed at the University of Eastern Finland and the Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute. The study used novel, long-term observations of individual behavior in groups and authentic angling trials to analyze if behaviors predict the vulnerability to fishing in brown trout reared in traditional and enriched hatchery rearing environments.

Contact: Laura Härkönen
laura.harkonen@oulu.fi
358-503-436-918
University of Eastern Finland

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New study uses DNA sequences to look back in time at key events in plant evolution
Scientists from North America, Europe and China have published a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that reveals important details about key transitions in the evolution of plant life on our planet. From strange and exotic algae, mosses, ferns, trees and flowers growing deep in steamy rainforests to the grains and vegetables we eat and the ornamental plants adorning our homes, all plant life on Earth shares over a billion years of history.

Contact: Press Office
huwen@genomics.cn
BGI Shenzhen

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Nutrition Today
Spices and herbs: Improving public health through flavorful eating -- a call to action
Spices and herbs can play a significant role in improving America's health by helping to reduce sodium, calorie and fat intake while making healthy eating more appealing, conclude the authors of a scientific supplement published this month in the peer-reviewed journal Nutrition Today.

Contact: Stefanie Woodhouse
stefanie_woodhouse@mccormick.com
410-527-8743
Weber Shandwick Chicago

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Trends in Plant Science
Salt-loving plants may be key to global efforts for sustainable food production
Farmland is vanishing in part because the salinity in the soil is rising as a result of climate change and other man-made phenomena. In an Opinion piece publishing in the Cell Press journal Trends in Plant Sciences, researchers propose a new concept for breeding salt- tolerant plants as a way to contribute to global efforts for sustainable food production.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Systematic Entomology
What's in a name? Everything -- if you're a fruit fly
This study confirms that four of the world's most destructive agricultural pests, the Oriental, Philippine, Invasive and Asian Papaya fruit flies, are actually one and the same. The study took a multidisciplinary and integrated approach involving over 40 researchers from more than 20 countries and has major implications for global plant biosecurity, including reduced barriers to international trade, improved fundamental research and enhanced food security for some of the world's poorest nations.
Queensland University of Technology, Plant Biosecurity Cooperative Research Centre, Mahidol University

Contact: Tony Steeper
t.steeper@pbcrc.com.au
61-417-697-470
Plant Biosecurity Cooperative Research Centre