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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
TGen-Luxembourg scientific team conducts unprecedented analysis of microbial ecosystem
An international team of scientists from the Translational Genomics Research Institute and The Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine have completed a first-of-its-kind microbial analysis of a biological waste water treatment plant that has broad implications for protecting the environment, energy recovery and human health. The study, published Nov. 26 in the scientific journal Nature Communications, describes in unprecedented detail the complex relationships within a model ecosystem.

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
ZooKeys
The influence of the Isthmus of Panama in the evolution of freshwater shrimps in America
The molecular evolution of freshwater shrimps in America was studied based in the relationship between Pacific and Atlantic sister species that are separated by the Isthmus of Panama. Despite the high morphological similarities between each pair of species, it was concluded that all species are valid taxonomic entities, proving the efficiency of the Isthmus for the genetic isolation of the species. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Fernando L. Mantelatto
flmantel@usp.br
55-163-602-3656
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Frontiers in Marine Science
Toolkit for ocean health
One of the global leaders in ocean science, Professor Carlos Duarte has shared his insights on the future of the world's oceans in a paper published in the international open-access journal Frontiers in Marine Science.

Contact: David Stacey
david.stacey@uwa.edu.au
61-864-883-229
Frontiers

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Protecting the rainforest through agriculture and forestry
Conservationists are always looking for ways to halt the pace of deforestation in tropical rainforests. One approach involves recultivating abandoned agricultural land. An international team investigating this concept has just published its findings in Nature Communications. Working in the mountainous regions of Ecuador, the researchers found afforestation and intense pasturing to be particularly effective, clearly increasing the environmental and economic value of abandoned farmlands.
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Barbara Wankerl
barbara.wankerl@tum.de
49-892-892-2562
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Hydrothermal settlers
OIST researcher Yuichi Nakajima decodes barnacle genetics to understand how climate change impacts the deep ocean.

Contact: Kaoru Natori
kaoru.natori@oist.jp
81-989-662-389
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
The unbelievable underworld and its impact on us all
A new study has pulled together research into the most diverse place on earth to demonstrate how the organisms below-ground could hold the key to understanding how the worlds ecosystems function and how they are responding to climate change.

Contact: Jamie Brown
jamie.brown@manchester.ac.uk
01-612-758-383
University of Manchester

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Journal of Bacteriology
Another reason to be thankful: Turkeys may be lifesavers
While the turkey you eat on Thursday will bring your stomach happiness and could probably kick-start an afternoon nap, it may also save your life one day.

Contact: Todd Hollingshead
toddh@byu.edu
801-422-8373
Brigham Young University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
A warming world may spell bad news for honey bees
A bee parasites from exotic climates threatens UK bees. Research predicts that an exotic gut parasite could cause increasing damage to UK bees as climates warms. The spread of the parasite is linked to climate and its superior competitive ability.
Insect Pollinators Initiative, UK's Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Defra, Natural Environment Research Council, Scottish Government, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Rob Dawson
rob.dawson@bbsrc.ac.uk
07-557-487-865
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Ecological Indicators
Mining can damage fish habitats far downstream, study shows
Anglers across the nation wondering why luck at their favorite fishing spot seems to have dried up may have a surprising culprit: a mine miles away, even in a different state. Scientists at Michigan State University have taken a first broad look at the impacts of mines across the country and found that mining can damage fish habitats miles downstream, and even in streams not directly connected to the mines.
US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-0206
Michigan State University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Animal Biotelemetry
Endangered hammerhead shark found migrating into unprotected waters
The precise movements of a young hammerhead shark have been tracked for the first time and are published in the open access journal Animal Biotelemetry. The study, which ran over a 10-month period, reveals important gaps in current efforts to protect these endangered sharks and suggests key locations that should be protected to help the survival of the species.

Contact: Joel Winston
Joel.Winston@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22081
BioMed Central

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Scientists could save thousands of pounds with student's DIY microscope
Expensive tests for measuring everything from sperm motility to cancer diagnosis have just been made hundreds of thousands of pounds cheaper by a Ph.D. student from Brunel University London who hacked his own microscope.

Contact: Keith Coles
keith.coles@brunel.ac.uk
Brunel University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
PLOS Biology
International collaboration completes genome sequence of centipede
An international collaboration of scientists including Baylor College of Medicine has completed the first genome sequence of a myriapod, Strigamia maritima -- a member of a group venomous centipedes that care for their eggs -- and uncovered new clues about their biological evolution and unique absence of vision and circadian rhythm.

Contact: Glenna Picton
picton@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Circumstances are right for weed invasion to escalate, researchers say
What some farmers grow as pasture plants others view as weeds. But with the need to cheaply feed food animals rising, circumstances are right for the weed invasion to escalate, says Jacob Barney, an assistant professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and a Fralin Life Science Institute affiliate.

Contact: Lindsay Taylor Key
ltkey@vt.edu
540-231-6594
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Soil Science Society of America Journal
Study finds way to conserve soil and water in world's driest wheat region
In the world's driest rainfed wheat region, Washington State University researchers have identified summer fallow management practices that can make all the difference for farmers, water and soil conservation, and air quality. Wheat growers in the Horse Heaven Hills of south-central Washington farm with an average of 6-8 inches of rain a year. Wind erosion has caused blowing dust that exceeded federal air quality standards 20 times in the past 10 years.
WSU Agricultural Research Center, USDA-NIFA

Contact: Bill Schillinger
william.schillinger@wsu.edu
509-235-1933
Washington State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
CT scans of coral skeletons reveal ocean acidity increases reef erosion
For coral reefs to persist, rates of reef construction must exceed reef breakdown. Prior research has largely focused on the negative impacts of ocean acidification on reef growth, but new research this week from scientists at the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology, based at the University of Hawai'i - Mānoa, demonstrates that lower ocean pH also enhances reef breakdown: a double-whammy for coral reefs in a changing climate.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Science Foundation, Sigma-Xi, and University of Hawai'i Sea Grant College Program

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Biology trumps chemistry in open ocean
Scientists laid out a new framework based on in situ observations that will allow them to describe and understand how phytoplankton assimilate limited concentrations of phosphorus, a key nutrient, in the ocean in ways that better reflect what is actually occurring in the marine environment. This is important because nutrient uptake is a property of ocean biogeochemistry, and in many regions controls carbon dioxide fixation, which ultimately can play a role in mitigating climate change.

Contact: Darlene Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-2567 x103
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Animal Ecology
Grasshoppers signal slow recovery of post-agricultural woodlands, study finds
By comparing grasshoppers found at woodland sites once used for agriculture to similar sites never disturbed by farming, UW-Madison researchers Philip Hahn and John Orrock show that despite decades of recovery, the numbers and types of species found in each differ, as do the understory plants and other ecological variables, like soil properties.
Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, US Department of Agriculture Forest Service, UW-Madison Department of Zoology

Contact: Phil Hahn
pghahn@wisc.edu
608-262-5868
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
USGS Open-File Report
Climate change could affect future of Lake Michigan basin
Climate change could lengthen the growing season, make soil drier and decrease winter snowpack in the Lake Michigan Basin by the turn of the century, among other hydrological effects.

Contact: Marisa Lubeck
mlubeck@usgs.gov
303-202-4765
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
The living, breathing ocean
The ocean is a complex ecosystem. The ocean carbon cycle is governed by the relationship among carbon, nutrients and oxygen, and the ratio between certain elements is key to understanding ocean respiration.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Animal Ecology
Lionfish analysis reveals most vulnerable prey as invasion continues
Findings of a study on lionfish predation behavior, which may also apply to some other fish and animal species, have shed some new light on which types of fish are most likely to face attack by this invasive predator, which has disrupted ecosystems in much of the Caribbean Sea and parts of the Atlantic Ocean.
Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada, David H. Smith Conservation Research Program

Contact: Stephanie Green
Stephanie.green@science.oregonstate.edu
778-808-0758
Oregon State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society
Avoiding ecosystem collapse
Three new studies describe concrete actions to prevent or reverse abrupt ecological shifts.

Contact: Kristen Weiss
kristenw@stanford.edu
831-333-2077
Stanford University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
ZooKeys
Italian natural history museums on the verge of collapse?
Are Italian natural history museums on the verge of collapse? A new study published in the open-access journal ZooKeys points out that these institutions are facing a critical situation and proposes an innovative solution in the face of a virtual structure acting as a 'metamuseum.'

Contact: Franco Andreone
franco.andreone@regione.piemonte.it
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Fisheries
Endangered Idaho salmon regaining fitness advantage
Endangered Snake River sockeye salmon are regaining the fitness of their wild ancestors, with naturally spawned juvenile sockeye returning from the ocean at a much higher rate than others from hatcheries, a new analysis has found. Biologists believe the increased return rate is high enough for the species to eventually sustain itself in the wild again.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Trends in Parasitology
Can stress management help save honeybees?
Honeybee populations are clearly under stress -- from the Varroa mite, insecticides, and other factors -- but it's been difficult to pinpoint any one of them as the root cause of devastating losses in honeybee hives. Researchers in a new paper say that the problem likely stems from a complex and poorly understood interplay of stresses and their impact on bee health. It's a situation they suspect might be improved through stress management and better honeybee nutrition.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Journal of the Botanical Research Institute of Texas
Rare new species of plant: Stachys caroliniana
University of South Carolina professor John Nelson knows you don't have to travel to a remote Amazon rainforest to discover a new species of plant. He and alumnus Douglas Rayner uncovered a rare hedge-nettle just 50 miles from Charleston, and they named it Stachys caroliniana, after the only state where it has been found.

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina