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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Environmental Pollution
First national study finds trees saving lives, reducing respiratory problems
In the first broad-scale estimate of air pollution removal by trees nationwide, US Forest Service scientists and collaborators calculated that trees are saving more than 850 human lives a year and preventing 670,000 incidences of acute respiratory symptoms.

Contact: Jane Hodgins
jmhodgins@fs.fed.us
651-649-5281
USDA Forest Service - Northern Research Station

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Smoke from Canadian fires hover over Great Lakes
Canadian wildfires have been raging this summer and some of the smoke from those fires is drifting downward into the US.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Burn scars in Eastern Russia
The burn scars on this false-color image from the Terra satellite show the different areas that have been affected by this year's rash of wildfires in Eastern Russia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Environmental Research Letters
Climate change increases risk of crop slowdown in next 20 years
The world faces a small but substantially increased risk over the next two decades of a major slowdown in the growth of global corn and wheat yields because of climate change, according to National Center for Atmospheric Research and Stanford University research. Such a slowdown would occur as global demand for crops rapidly increases.
National Science Foundation, Department of Energy

Contact: David Hosansky, NCAR/UCAR Media Relations
hosansky@ucar.edu
303-497-8611
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
5th International Conference on Plant Cell Wall Biology
New hope for powdery mildew resistant barley
New research at the University of Adelaide has opened the way for the development of new lines of barley with resistance to powdery mildew.

Contact: Alan Little
alan.little@adelaide.edu.au
61-883-137-260
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
The microbes make the sake brewery
A sake brewery has its own microbial terroir, meaning the microbial populations found on surfaces in the facility resemble those found in the product, creating the final flavor according to research published ahead of print in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. This is the first time investigators have taken a microbial census of a sake brewery.

Contact: Jim Sliwa
jsliwa@asmusa.org
202-942-9297
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Biology Letters
Moose drool inhibits growth of toxic fungus: York U research
Research out of York University shows a surprisingly effective way to fight against a certain species of toxic grass fungus: moose saliva -- yes, moose saliva.

Contact: Robin Heron
rheron@yorku.ca
416-736-2100 x22097
York University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of the Air and Water Association
Study gives new perspective on agricultural plastic, debris burning, and air quality
A recent study published in the Journal of the Air and Water Association shows that inclusion of agricultural plastic in debris piles has no effect on smoke emissions.

Contact: Walita Kay Williams
walitakwilliams@fs.fed.us
510-559-6367
USDA Forest Service - Pacific Southwest Research Station

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Fukushima accident underscores need for US to seek out new information about nuclear plant hazards
A new congressionally mandated report from the National Academy of Sciences concludes that the overarching lesson learned from the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident is that nuclear plant licensees and their regulators must actively seek out and act on new information about hazards with the potential to affect the safety of nuclear plants.
Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Contact: Jennifer Walsh
news@nas.edu
202-334-2138
National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Fires in Central Africa during July 2014
Hundreds of fires covered central Africa in mid-July 2014, as the annual fire season continues across the region.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Environmental Pollution
Corn and soy insecticides similar to nicotine found widespread in Midwest rivers -- USGS news
Insecticides similar to nicotine, known as neonicotinoids, were found commonly in streams throughout the Midwest, according to a new USGS study. This is the first broad-scale investigation of neonicotinoid insecticides in the Midwestern United States and one of the first conducted within the United States.
US Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program

Contact: Alex Demas
apdemas@usgs.gov
703-648-4421
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Chemist develops X-ray vision for quality assurance
A Technical University of Denmark researcher has developed a method that uses X-rays for the rapid identification of substances present in an indeterminate powder. The new technique has the capacity to recognize advanced biological molecules such as proteins. The method therefore has enormous potential in both food production and the pharmaceutical industry, where it opens up new opportunities for the quality assurance of protein-based medicines, for example.

Contact: Christian Grundahl Frankaer
cghar@kemi.dtu.dk
45-45-25-24-69
Technical University of Denmark

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
New methods of detecting Salmonella in pork meat processing
Infections caused by food-borne microorganisms are an increasing public health burden. In a Ph.D. project at the National Food Institute at the Technical University of Denmark, new methods of characterizing and detecting foodborne illness-causing Salmonella in pork meat processing and in bacteria in water, feed and food samples were studied.

Contact: Jeffrey Hoorfar
jhoo@food.dtu.dk
45-35-88-73-79
Technical University of Denmark

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Four-billion-year-old chemistry in cells today
Parts of the primordial soup in which life arose have been maintained in our cells today according to scientists at the University of East Anglia. Research published today in the Journal of Biological Chemistry reveals how cells in plants, yeast and very likely also in animals still perform ancient reactions thought to have been responsible for the origin of life -- some four billion years ago.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Noise pollution impacts fish species differently
Acoustic disturbance has different effects on different species of fish, according to a new study from the universities of Bristol and Exeter which tested fish anti-predator behavior.

Contact: Philippa Walker
press-office@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-7777
University of Bristol

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Western Indian Ocean communities play vital role in conservation
An international team of researchers led by the University of York has carried out the first assessment of community-led marine conservation in the Western Indian Ocean. The results, reported in the journal PLOS ONE, point to a revolution in the management of marine protected areas, with almost half of the sites -- more than 11,000 square km -- in the region now under local community stewardship.
Natural Environment Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-019-043-22153
University of York

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Food Policy
Farmers market vouchers may boost produce consumption in low-income families
Vouchers to buy fresh fruits and vegetables at farmers markets increase the amount of produce in the diets of some families on food assistance, according to research led by New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
Wholesome Wave

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@nyu.edu
212-998-6797
New York University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles
Invertebrate numbers have decreased by 45 percent on average over a 35 year period in which the human population doubled, reports a study on the impact of humans on declining animal numbers. This decline matters because of the enormous benefits invertebrates such as insects, spiders, crustaceans, slugs and worms bring to our day-to-day lives, including pollination and pest control for crops, decomposition for nutrient cycling, water filtration and human health.

Contact: Rebecca Caygill
r.caygill@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-310-83846
University College London

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Pesticide linked to 3 generations of disease
Washington State University researchers say ancestral exposures to the pesticide methoxychlor may lead to adult onset kidney disease, ovarian disease and obesity in future generations.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Skinner
skinner@wsu.edu
509-335-1524
Washington State University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Urban heat boosts some pest populations 200-fold, killing red maples
New research shows that urban 'heat islands' are slowly killing red maples in the southeastern United States. One factor is that researchers have found warmer temperatures increase the number of young produced by the gloomy scale insect -- a significant tree pest -- by 300 percent, which in turn leads to 200 times more adult gloomy scales on urban trees.
Department of the Interior's Southeast Climate Science Center, US Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Rosemary and oregano contain diabetes-fighting compounds
The popular culinary herbs oregano and rosemary are packed with healthful compounds, and now lab tests show they could work in much the same way as prescription anti-diabetic medication, scientists report. In their new study published in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, they found that how the herbs are grown makes a difference, and they also identified which compounds contribute the most to this promising trait.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Ecology and Evolution
UNH NHAES researchers work to save endangered New England cottontail
Scientists with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station are working to restore New Hampshire and Maine's only native rabbit after new research based on genetic monitoring has found that in the last decade, cottontail populations in northern New England have become more isolated and seen a 50 percent contraction of their range.
New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, State Wildlife Grant, Department of Transportation, Maine Outdoor Heritage Fund,

Contact: Lori Wright
lori.wright@unh.edu
603-862-1452
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Global Change Biology
Rising temperatures hinder Indian wheat production
Geographers at the University of Southampton have found a link between increasing average temperatures in India and a reduction in wheat production.
University of Southampton

Contact: Peter Franklin
p.franklin@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-5457
University of Southampton

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
15-year analysis of blue whale range off California finds conflict with shipping lanes
A comprehensive analysis of the movements of blue whales off the West Coast found that their favored feeding areas are bisected by heavily used shipping lanes, increasing the threat of injury and mortality. But moving the shipping lanes off Los Angeles and San Francisco to slightly different areas -- at least, during summer and fall when blue whales are most abundant -- could significantly decrease the probability of ships striking the whales.
National Science Foundation, National Geographic Society, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Bruce Mate
bruce.mate@oregonstate.edu
541-867-0202
Oregon State University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Blue whales' dangerous feeding grounds
Tracking of blue whales by satellite over a 15-year period off the US West Coast suggests that the whales consistently return to feed in specific locations each year.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS