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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Marine Policy
Law of the Sea authorizes animal tagging research without nations' consent
Scientists who study migratory marine animals can rarely predict where the animals' paths will lead. In a new paper, Duke researchers argue that coastal nations don't have precedent under the law of the sea to require scientists to seek advance permission to remotely track tagged animals who may enter their waters. Requiring advance consent undermines the goals of the law, which is meant to encourage scientific research for conservation of marine animals.
Mary Derrickson McCurdy Visiting Scholar Program, Duke University Marine Laboratory

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Climate change impacts countered by stricter fisheries management
A new study has found that implementing stricter fisheries management overcame the expected detrimental effects of climate change disturbances in coral reef fisheries badly impacted by the 1997/98 El Niño, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
BMC Biology
Decrease of genetic diversity in the endangered Saimaa ringed seal continues
The critically endangered Saimaa ringed seal, which inhabits Lake Saimaa in Finland, has extremely low genetic diversity and this development seems to continue, according to a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland.

Contact: Mia Valtonen
mia.valtonen@uef.fi
358-504-424-404
University of Eastern Finland

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS Pathogens
To wilt or not to wilt
Plant breeders have long identified and cultivated disease-resistant varieties. A research team at the University of California, Riverside has now revealed a new molecular mechanism for resistance and susceptibility to a common fungus that causes wilt in susceptible tomato plants.
Los Alamos National Laboratory-UC Riverside Collaborative Program in Infectious Disease.

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Bodies at sea: Ocean oxygen levels may impact scavenger response
An ocean's oxygen levels may play a role in the impact of marine predators on bodies when they are immersed in the sea, according to Simon Fraser University researchers, who deployed a trio of pig carcasses into Saanich Inlet off Vancouver Island and studied them using an underwater camera via the internet.
Canadian Police Research Centre

Contact: Gail Anderson
ganderso@sfu.ca
778-782-3589
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
HortTechnology
Helping sweet cherries survive the long haul
Research into the effectiveness of hydrocooling of sweet cherries at commercial packing houses determined the need for post-packing cooling. Analyses determined that core temperatures achieved by in-line hydrocoolers during packing did not reduce temperatures sufficiently to ensure good quality retention over the longer periods of time required for container shipping to export markets. The study recommends forced-air cooling to further reduce sweet cherry temperatures in the box before shipping.

Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Fires in the southern United States
In this image taken by the Aqua satellite of the southern United States actively burning areas as detected by MODIS's thermal bands are outlined in red.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Flu at the zoo and other disasters: Experts help animal exhibitors prepare for the worst
Here are three disaster scenarios for zoo or aquarium managers: one, a wildfire lunges towards your facility, threatening your staff and hundreds of zoo animals. Two, hurricane floodwaters pour into your basement, where more than 10,000 exotic fish and marine mammals live in giant tanks. Three, local poultry farmers report avian influenza (bird flu) in their chickens, a primary source of protein for your big cats. What do you do?
US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Top marine scientists call for action on 'invisible' fisheries
To protect our oceans from irreversible harm, governments, conservationists, and researchers around the world must address the enormous threat posed by unregulated and destructive fisheries, say top marine scientists.

Contact: Tyler Stiem
t.stiem@projectseahorse.org
604-827-5142
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Nature
No-till agriculture may not bring hoped-for boost in global crop yields, study finds
No-till farming appears to hold promise for boosting crop yields only in dry regions, not in the cool, moist areas of the world, this study found.
National Key Science and Technology Project of China

Contact: Patricia Bailey
pjbailey@ucdavis.edu
530-752-9843
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Arrested development -- Sediment wreaks havoc with fish larvae
Sediments associated with dredging and flood plumes could have a significant impact on fish populations by extending the time required for the development of their larvae, according to Australian researchers

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Ecology
Seaweed engineers build crustacean homes; old forests store new nitrogen
In this month's issue of Ecology, invasive seaweed shelters native crustaceans, mature forests store nitrogen in soil, and stream invertebrates aren't eating what we thought they were eating.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
BioScience
New tool identifies high-priority dams for fish survival
Scientists have identified 181 California dams that may need to increase water flows to protect native fish downstream. The screening tool, developed by the Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California, Davis, to select 'high-priority' dams may be particularly useful during drought years amid competing demands for water.
Natural Resources Defense Council, California Trout, Trout Unlimited, the S.D. Bechtel Jr. Foundation, and the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program

Contact: Ted Grantham
tgrantham@usgs.gov
970-226-9386
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
New study shows that shifting precipitation patterns affect tea flavor, health compounds
New research shows that major antioxidant compounds that determine tea health properties and taste fell up to 50 percent during an extreme monsoon.

Contact: Evelyn Boswell
evelynb@montana.edu
406-994-5135
Montana State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry
Olive oil more stable and healthful than seed oils for frying food
Frying is one of the world's most popular ways to prepare food -- think fried chicken and french fries. Even candy bars and whole turkeys have joined the list. But before dunking your favorite food in a vat of just any old oil, consider using olive. Scientists report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that olive oil withstands the heat of the fryer or pan better than several seed oils to yield more healthful food.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature
Cause of aging remains elusive
A report by Chinese researchers in the journal Nature a few months ago was a small sensation: they appeared to have found the cause for why organisms age. An international team of scientists, headed by the University of Bonn, has now refuted a basic assumption of the Nature article. The reasons for aging thus remain elusive.
German Research Foundation

Contact: Dr. Markus Schwarzländer
markus.schwarzlander@uni-bonn.de
49-022-873-54266
University of Bonn

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Global consumption an increasingly significant driver of tropical deforestation
International trade with agricultural and wood products is an increasingly important driver of tropical deforestation. More than a third of recent deforestation can be tied to production of beef, soy, palm oil and timber. 'The trend is clear, the drivers of deforestation have been globalized and commercialized,' says assistant professor Martin Persson, Chalmers University of Technology.

Contact: Christian Borg
christian.borg@chalmers.se
46-317-723-395
Chalmers University of Technology

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Rescued 'abandoned' penguin chicks' survival similar to colony rates
Abandoned penguin chicks that were hand-reared and returned to the wild showed a similar survival rate to their naturally reared counterparts.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Food Science
Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes
A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists, evaluated consumers' choice in fresh tomato selection and revealed which characteristics make the red fruit most appealing.

Contact: Stephanie Callahan
scallahan@ift.org
312-604-0273
Institute of Food Technologists

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
American Naturalist
Bite to the death: Sugarbag bees launch all-conquering raids
An Australian native stingless bee species declares war on its neighbours by launching swarms of bees that lock hive-defenders in a death grip with their jaws so that both combatants die.

Contact: Niki Widdowson
n.widdowson@qut.edu.au
61-731-382-999
Queensland University of Technology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Misreporting diet information could impact nutrition recommendations for Hispanics
A new paper takes a critical look at how faulty self-reporting of the food we eat can lead to incorrect conclusions about whether we are meeting dietary recommendations for certain essential nutrients.

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
ICES Journal of Marine Science
BOFFFFs (big, old, fat, fertile, female fish) sustain fisheries
A new compilation of research from around the world now shows that big, old, fat, fertile, female fish -- known as BOFFFFs to scientists -- are essential for ensuring that fishery stocks remain sustainable.

Contact: Mark Hixon
hixonm@hawaii.edu
808-956-6427
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Behavioral Ecology
Built-in billboards: Male bluefin killifish signal different things with different fins
They help fish swim, but fins also advertise a fish's social standing and health. In a new study, researchers report that for the male bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei), each colorful fin presents its own messages to other fish.
National Science Foundation Division of Environmental Biology

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Let there be light
A longstanding question among scientists is whether evolution is predictable. A team of researchers from University of California Santa Barbara may have found a preliminary answer. The genetic underpinnings of complex traits in cephalopods may in fact be predictable because they evolved in the same way in two distinct species of squid.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management
Pharmaceuticals and the water-fish-osprey food web
Ospreys do not carry significant amounts of human pharmaceutical chemicals, despite widespread occurrence of these chemicals in water, a recent U.S. Geological Survey and Baylor University study finds. These research findings, published by Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management is the first published study that examines the bioaccumulation of pharmaceuticals in the water-fish-osprey food web.

Contact: Jen Lynch
jen.lynch@setac.org
850-469-150-0109
Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry