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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Exceptionally well preserved insect fossils from the Rhône Valley
In Bavaria, the Tithonian Konservat-Lagerstätte of lithographic limestone is well known as a result of numerous discoveries of emblematic fossils from that area (for example, Archaeopteryx). Now, for the first time, researchers have found fossil insects in the French equivalent of these outcrops -- discoveries which include a new species representing the oldest known water treader.

Contact: Nel Andre
anel@mnhn.fr
PeerJ

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
PhytoKeys
Week-long meeting on naming algae, fungi, and plants recorded for posterity
The XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne, Australia in 2011 included a week-long meeting of 200 of the world's experts on naming algae, fungi, and plants. Key results were that new scientific names could be published in electronic-only journals and that English could be used instead of Latin for formal descriptions of species new to science. The official, detailed record of this meeting has been published as a forum paper in the open-access journal PhytoKeys.

Contact: Christina Flann
christinaflann@gmail.com
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nature's tiny engineers
Corals control their environment, stirring up water eddies to bring nutrients.

Contact: Andrew Carleen
acarleen@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sierra Nevada freshwater runoff could drop 26 percent by 2100, UC study finds
Freshwater runoff from the Sierra Nevada may decrease by as much as one-quarter by 2100 due to climate warming on the high slopes, according to scientists at UC Irvine and UC Merced.
National Science Foundation, Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory, US Department of Energy

Contact: Laura Rico
lrico@uci.edu
949-824-9055
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature Climate Change
Changing global diets is vital to reducing climate change
Healthier diets and reducing food waste are part of a combination of solutions needed to ensure food security and avoid dangerous climate change, say the team behind a new study.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Nature Geoscience
Reducing water scarcity possible by 2050
It is possible to significantly reduce water scarcity in just over 35 years, according to researchers from McGill University and Utrecht University. In a new paper in Nature Geoscience, they outline strategies in six key areas that they believe can be combined in different ways in different parts of the world in order to effectively reduce water stress by 2050.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Contact: Chris Chipello
christopher.chipello@mcgill.ca
514-398-4201
McGill University

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Current Biology
Ready for mating at the right time
Fish rely on pheromones to trigger social responses and to coordinate reproductive behavior in males and females. Scientists at the Marine Science Center at the University of the Algarve in Faro, Portugal, and at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have now identified such a signal molecule in the urine of male Mozambique tilapia: this pheromone boosts hormone production and accelerates oocyte maturation in reproductive females.
Foundation for Science and Technology of Portugal, Max Planck Society

Contact: Dr. Bernd Schneider
schneider@ice.mpg.de
49-364-157-1600
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
The ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
Not all phytoplankton in the ocean need to take their vitamins
Some species of marine phytoplankton, such as the prolific bloomer Emiliania huxleyi, can grow without consuming vitamin B1 (thiamine), researchers have discovered.
National Center for Genome Resources, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Packard Foundation

Contact: Lindsay Jolivet
lindsay.jolivet@cifar.ca
416-971-4876
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell
Prions can trigger 'stuck' wine fermentations, researchers find
A biochemical communication system that crosses from bacteria to yeast, making use of prions, has been discovered. It is responsible for a chronic winemaking problem known as 'stuck fermentation' and may also have implications for better understanding metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, in humans.
G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Patricia Bailey
pjbailey@ucdavis.edu
530-752-9843
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Ecology Letters
Study finds marine protected areas inadequate for protecting fish and ocean ecology
A new study reports that an expansion of marine protected areas is needed to protect fish species that perform key ecological functions. According to investigators from the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations, previous efforts at protecting fish have focused on saving the largest numbers of species, often at the expense of those species that provide key and difficult-to-replace ecological functions.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
American Journal of Botany
Together, humans and computers can figure out the plant world
Recent research applying bioinformatics and biometrics to the study of plant form and function is presented in a special issue on Bioinformatic and Biometric Methods in Plant Morphology, published in Applications in Plant Sciences. The methods presented in the issue include automated classification and identification, a new online pollen database with semantic search capabilities, geometric morphometrics, and skeleton networks, and present a picture of a renaissance in morphometric approaches that capitalize on recent technological advances.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Parada
apps@botany.org
American Journal of Botany

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Nature
Study shows where on the planet new roads should and should not go
Researchers have created a 'large-scale zoning plan' that aims to limit the environmental costs of road expansion while maximizing its benefits for human development.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Current Opinion in Plant Biology
A touching story: The ancient conversation between plants, fungi and bacteria
The mechanical force that a single fungal cell or bacterial colony exerts on a plant cell may seem vanishingly small, but it plays a heavy role in setting up some of the most fundamental symbiotic relationships in biology. In fact, plants may have never moved onto land without the ability to respond to the touch of beneficial fungi, according to a new study led by Jean-Michel Ané, a professor of agronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Contact: Jean-Michel Ané
jane@wisc.edu
608-262-6457
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Water 'thermostat' could help engineer drought-resistant crops
Researchers have identified a gene that could help engineer drought-resistant crops. The gene, called OSCA1, encodes a protein in the cell membrane of plants that senses changes in water availability and adjusts the plant's water conservation machinery accordingly. The findings appear in the journal Nature and could make it easier to feed the world's growing population in the face of climate change.
US Department of Agriculture, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Ecology
More wolf spiders feasting on American toads due to invasive grass, UGA study shows
An invasive grass species frequently found in forests has created a thriving habitat for wolf spiders, who then feed on American toads, a new University of Georgia study has found. Japanese stiltgrass, which was accidentally introduced to the US in the early 1900s, is one of the most pervasive invasive species. Typically found along roads and in forests, it has been found to impact native plant species, invertebrate populations and soil nutrients.

Contact: John Maerz
jcmaerz@uga.edu
706-705-2003
University of Georgia

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
American Meteorological Society’s Journal of Climate
Southwest may face 'megadrought' this century
Due to global warming, scientists say, the chances of the southwestern United States experiencing a decade long drought is at least 50 percent, and the chances of a 'megadrought' -- one that lasts over 30 years -- ranges from 20 to 50 percent over the next century.
National Science Foundation, National Center for Atmospheric Research, US Geological Survey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Veld Fires in South Africa
South Africa is entering what is described by the Volunteer Wildfire Services of South Africa as 'Cape Fire Season.' The Eastern Cape provincial government warned residents in certain parts of the province on Monday of strong winds and veld fires.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Marine Pollution Bulletin
NOAA's Marine Debris Program reports on the national issue of derelict fishing traps
Thousands of fishing traps are lost or abandoned each year in US waters. The NOAA report is the first of its kind to examine the derelict fish trap problem, nationally, and recommends actions to better manage and prevent it.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Keeley Belva
keeley.belva@noaa.gov
301-643-6463
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
How to prevent organic food fraud
A growing number of consumers are willing to pay a premium for fruits, vegetables and other foods labelled 'organic,' but whether they're getting what the label claims is another matter. Now scientists studying conventional and organic tomatoes are devising a new way to make sure farms are labeling their produce appropriately. Their report, which appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, could help prevent organic food fraud.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nucleic Acids Research
Researchers discover why Listeria bacterium is so hard to fight
The harmful and potentially deadly bacterium Listeria is extremely good at adapting to changes. Now research from University of Southern Denmark uncovers exactly how cunning Listeria is and why it is so hard to fight. The discovery can help develop more efficient ways to combat the bacteria.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Happy Camp and July Fire Complexes in California
As of seven hours ago the Happy Camp Complex of fires had consumed 24,939 acres of land in Northern California, the July complex had consumed 35,530 as of eight hours ago.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Chemosphere
Leading scientists call for a stop to non-essential use of fluorochemicals
A number of leading international researchers, amongst others from the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, recommend that fluorochemicals are only used where they are absolutely essential, until better methods exist to measure the chemicals and more is known about their potentially harmful effects. The recommendation appears in the Helsingør Statement following an international conference.

Contact: Xenia Trier
xttr@food.dtu.dk
45-35-88-74-71
Technical University of Denmark

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Global Ecology and Biogeography
New study charts the global invasion of crop pests
Many of the world's most important crop-producing countries will be fully saturated with pests by the middle of the century if current trends continue, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-782-730-9332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Global Change Biology
Museum specimens, modern cities show how an insect pest will respond to climate change
Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that century-old museum specimens hold clues to how global climate change will affect a common insect pest that can weaken and kill trees -- and the news is not good.
US Geological Survey, National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Bronze Age wine cellar found
A Bronze Age palace excavation reveals an ancient wine cellar, according to a study published Aug. 27, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andrew Koh from Brandeis University and colleagues.
Brandeis University, University of Haifa, George Washington University, National Geographic Society, Israel Science Foundation, Institute for Aegean Prehistory, Bronfman Philanthropies

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS