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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Metabolomics
NUS study shows effectiveness of common anti-malarial drug in controlling asthma
Associate Professor Fred Wong from the Department of Pharmacology at the NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine led a team to discover that artesunate, a common herbal-based anti-malarial drug, can be used to control asthma, with better treatment outcomes than other drugs currently available.

Contact: Carolyn Fong
carolyn@nus.edu.sg
65-651-65399
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Scientists warn time to stop drilling in the dark
The co-authors of a new study, including two Simon Fraser University research associates, cite new reasons why scientists, industry representatives and policymakers must collaborate closely on minimizing damage to the natural world from shale gas development. Viorel Popescu and Maureen Ryan, David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellows in SFU's Biological Sciences department, are among eight international co-authors of the newly published research in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Science
Developmental regulation of important plant phloem components discovered
Researchers at the University of Helsinki's Institute of Biotechnology, Finland, have combined traditional genetic approaches with 3-D reconstructions from scanning electron microscopy to discover and characterize genes regulating the development of plant sieve elements.

Contact: Yrjö Helariutta
yrjo.helariutta@helsinki.fi
358-407-201-968
University of Helsinki

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Environmental Biology of Fishes
Invasive lionfish likely safe to eat after all
Scientists from University of Hawaii have learned that recent fears of invasive lionfish causing fish poisoning may be unfounded. If so, current efforts to control lionfish by fishing derbies and targeted fisheries may remain the best way to control the invasion. And there's a simple way to know for sure whether a lionfish is toxic: test it after it's been cooked.

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Study of bigeye tuna in Northwest Atlantic uses new tracking methods
This NOAA-funded research, which used a new approach to study one of the most important commercial tuna species in the Atlantic, provides the longest available fishery-independent record of bigeye tuna movements to date. Data should help researchers to further characterize habitat use and assess the need for more monitoring in high-catch areas.
NOAA

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Study finds benefits to burning Flint Hills prairie in fall and winter
A new study looks at 20 years of data concerning the consequences of burning Flint Hills prairie at different times of the year. It finds that burning outside of the current late spring time frame has no measurable negative consequences for the prairie, and in fact, may have multiple benefits.

Contact: Joseph Craine
jcraine@k-state.edu
785-317-9318
Kansas State University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Annals of the Entomological Society of America
Oldest rove beetle in the Omaliini tribe found in French amber
An international team of scientists from Spain, France, and the US has discovered and described a rove beetle that is the oldest definitive member of the tribe Omaliini that has ever been found in amber.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
FASEB Journal
Scientists shine bright new light on how living things capture energy from the sun
In a new research report published in the August 2014 issue of the FASEB Journal, scientists may have uncovered a new method of exploiting the power of sunlight by focusing on a naturally occurring combination of lipids that have been strikingly conserved throughout evolution.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
PhytoKeys
Brother of hibiscus is found alive and well on Maui
Most people are familiar with hibiscus flowers -- they are an iconic symbol of tropical resorts worldwide where they are commonly planted in the landscape. Only a few, however, are aware of an equally beautiful and highly endangered related group of plants known as Hibiscadelphus -- literally 'brother of hibiscus.' Remarkably, in 2012 scientists found a population of these unique trees in a remote, steep valley on the west side of Maui.

Contact: Hank Oppenheimer
henryo@hawaii.edu
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
99th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
The Rim Fire 1 year later: A natural experiment in fire ecology and management
The 2013 California Rim Fire crossed management boundaries when it burned out of the Stanislaus National Forest and into to Yosemite National Park, providing a natural demonstration of the effects of a history of fire suppression on wildfire dynamics.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
ChemBioChem
Engineering a protein to prevent brain damage from toxic agents
New research may help prevent brain damage for those exposed to pesticides and chemical weapons. The work centers on proteins called phosphotriesterases, which are able to degrade chemicals known as organophosphates -- found in everything from industrial pesticides to sarin gas. They permanently bond to neurotransmitters in the brain, interfering with their ability to function and causing irreversible damage. The researchers re-engineered the protein to make it sufficiently stable to be used therapeutically.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Boat noise impacts development and survival of sea hares
The development and survival of an important group of marine invertebrates known as sea hares is under threat from increasing boat noise in the world's oceans, according to a new study by researchers from the UK and France.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Current Biology
Selective logging takes its toll on mammals, amphibians
The selective logging of trees in otherwise intact tropical forests can take a serious toll on the number of animal species living there. Mammals and amphibians are particularly sensitive to the effects of high-intensity logging, according to researchers in the Cell Press journal Current Biology who conducted a meta-analysis of almost 50 previously published studies from around the world.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Study: Marine pest provides advances in maritime anti-fouling and biomedicine
A team of biologists, led by Clemson University associate professor Andrew S. Mount, performed cutting-edge research on a marine pest that will pave the way for novel anti-fouling paint for ships and boats and also improve bio-adhesives for medical and industrial applications. The team's findings, published in Nature Communications, examined the last larval stage of barnacles that attaches to a wide variety of surfaces using highly versatile, natural, possibly polymeric material that acts as an underwater heavy-duty adhesive.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Andrew S. Mount
mount@clemson.edu
864-656-3597
Clemson University

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Biological Conservation
Saving seeds the right way can save the world's plants
Exotic pests, shrinking ranges and a changing climate threaten some of the world's most rare and ecologically important plants, and so conservationists establish seed collections to save the seeds in banks or botanical gardens in hopes of preserving some genetic diversity.
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis

Contact: Catherine Crawley
ccrawley@nimbios.org
865-974-9350
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry
Toward a home test for detecting potentially dangerous levels of caffeine
The shocking news of an Ohio teen who died of a caffeine overdose in May highlighted the potential dangers of the normally well-tolerated and mass-consumed substance. To help prevent serious health problems that can arise from consuming too much caffeine, scientists are reporting progress toward a rapid, at-home test to detect even low levels of the stimulant in most beverages and even breast milk. Their report appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Peru's carbon quantified: Economic and conservation boon
Today scientists unveiled the first high-resolution map of the carbon stocks stored on land throughout the entire country of Peru. The new and improved methodology used to make the map marks a sea change for future market-based carbon economies. The new carbon map also reveals Peru's extremely high ecological diversity and it provides the critical input to studies of deforestation and forest degradation for conservation, land use, and enforcement purposes.

Contact: Greg Asner
gpa@carnegiescience.edu
650-380-2828
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Genome Biology
How black truffles deal with the jumpers in their genome
The black truffle uses reversible epigenetic processes to regulate its genes, and adapt to changes in its surroundings. The 'methylome' -- a picture of the genome regulation taking place in the truffle, is published in the open-access journal Genome Biology and illustrates how the truffle deals with its complex genome's repeating elements and 'jumping genes.' The authors say this may shed light on how traits like aroma and color are controlled.

Contact: Anna Perman
Anna.Perman@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2429
BioMed Central

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Pesticide DDT linked to slow metabolism, obesity and diabetes
UC Davis study is the first to show that developmental exposure to DDT increases the risk of females later developing metabolic syndrome -- a cluster of conditions that include increased body fat, blood glucose, and cholesterol.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Michele La Merrill
mlamerrill@ucdavis.edu
707-800-2920
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Deep-sea octopus has longest-known egg-brooding period
A deep-sea octopus protected and tended her eggs until they hatched 4.5 years later.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Deep-sea octopus broods eggs for over 4 years -- longer than any known animal
Researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute have observed a deep-sea octopus brooding its eggs for four and one half years -- longer than any other known animal. This amazing feat represents an evolutionary balancing act between the benefits to the young octopuses of having plenty of time to develop within their eggs, and their mother's ability to survive for years with little or no food.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Meilina Dalit
mdalit@mbari.org
831-775-1716
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
International Journal of Hospitality Management
Menu secrets that can make you slim by design
If you've ever ordered the wrong food at a restaurant, don't blame yourself; blame the menu. What you order may have less to do with what you want and more to do with a menu's layout and descriptions.

Contact: Nicole Albright
foodandbrandlab@cornell.edu
607-255-7827
Cornell Food & Brand Lab

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Biodiversity and Conservation
Major turtle nesting beaches protected in 1 of the UK's far flung overseas territories
Sea turtles are not a species one would normally associate with the United Kingdom. But on the remote UK overseas territory of Ascension Island, one of the world's largest green turtle populations is undergoing something of a renaissance.

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-782-730-9332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Prehistoric dairy farming at the extremes
Finland's love of milk has been traced back to 2500 BC thanks to high-tech techniques to analyze residues preserved in fragments of ancient pots.
Finnish Cultural Foundation, Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
University of Bristol

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Wildfires continue near Yellowknife, Canada
The wildfires that have been plaguing the Northern Territories in Canada and have sent smoke drifting down to the Great Lakes in the US continue on.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center