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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Canola genome sequence reveals evolutionary 'love triangle'
An international team of scientists including researchers from the University of Georgia recently published the genome of Brassica napus -- commonly known as canola -- in the journal Science. Their discovery paves the way for improved versions of the plant, which is used widely in farming and industry.

Contact: Andrew Paterson
paterson@plantbio.uga.edu
706-583-0162
University of Georgia

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Journal of Food Science
Ice cream goes Southern, okra extracts may increase shelf-life
While okra has been widely used as a vegetable for soups and stews, a new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists, shows how okra extracts can be used as a stabilizer in ice cream.

Contact: Stephanie Callahan
scallahan@ift.org
312-604-0273
Institute of Food Technologists

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Journal of Food Science
When it comes to how pizza looks, cheese matters
A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists, evaluated the pizza baking performance of different cheeses (mozzarella, cheddar, colby, Edam, Emmental, Gruyere, and provolone) in conjunction with a new quantifiable evaluation technique to see how their composition and functional differences affected browning and blistering.

Contact: Stephanie Callahan
scallahan@ift.org
312-604-0273
Institute of Food Technologists

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Nature
800 meters beneath Antarctic ice sheet, subglacial lake holds viable microbial ecosystems
According to LSU's Brent Christner, the paper's lead author and a researcher with the NSF-funded Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling, or WISSARD, project, 'hidden beneath a half-mile of ice in Antarctica is an unexplored part of our biosphere. WISSARD has provided a glimpse of the nature of microbial life that may lurk under more than five million square miles of ice sheet.'
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dawn Jenkins
djenkins1@lsu.edu
225-578-2935
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Hot-spring bacteria reveal ability to use far-red light for photosynthesis
Bacteria growing in near darkness use a previously unknown process for harvesting energy and producing oxygen from sunlight, a research team led by a Penn State University scientist has discovered. The discovery lays the foundation for further research aimed at improving plant growth, harvesting energy from the sun, and understanding dense blooms like those now occurring on Lake Erie and other lakes worldwide.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
PLOS Pathogens
From dandruff to deep sea vents, an ecologically hyper-diverse fungus
A ubiquitous skin fungus linked to dandruff, eczema and other itchy, flaky maladies in humans has now been tracked to even further global reaches -- including Hawaiian coral reefs and the extreme environments of arctic soils and deep sea vents.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Talia Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Current Biology
Viruses take down massive algal blooms, with big implications for climate
Humans are increasingly dependent on algae, too, to suck up climate-warming carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sink it to the bottom of the ocean. Now, by using a combination of satellite imagery and laboratory experiments, researchers have evidence showing that viruses infecting those algae are driving the life-and-death dynamics of the algae's blooms, even when all else stays essentially the same, and this has important implications for our climate.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Marine protected areas might not be enough to help overfished reefs recover
Pacific corals and fish can both smell a bad neighborhood, and use that ability to avoid settling in damaged reefs.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Bioenergetics
Water and sunlight the formula for sustainable fuel
An Australian National University team has successfully replicated one of the crucial steps in photosynthesis, opening the way for biological systems powered by sunlight which could manufacture hydrogen as a fuel.

Contact: Dr. Kastoori Hingorani
kastoori.hingorani@anu.edu.au
61-415-575-278
Australian National University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Physiological and Biochemical Zoology
Salmon forced to 'sprint' less likely to survive migration
Sockeye salmon that sprint to spawning grounds through fast-moving waters may be at risk, suggests new research by University of British Columbia scientists.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Beaver complex and July complex wildfires in California
Beaver complex and July complex fires are seen in this Terra image from Aug. 19, 2014.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Signs of deforestation in Brazil
Multiple fires are visible in in this image of the Para and Mato Grosso states of Brazil. Many of these were most likely intentionally set in order to deforest the land.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Nature
Seals introduced tuberculosis to the New World
Seals carried tuberculosis from Africa to the Peruvian coast a new nature shows. Scientists analyzed 1,000 years old skeletons from Peru and discovered M. pinnipedii, a relative of the TB-bacterium, which affects seals today. They assume that the exploitation of seals as a dietary staple facilitated the transmission from animals to humans. These results could have an impact on the future search for a vaccine against tuberculosis. The study is published in nature.

Contact: Christian Heuss
christian.heuss@unibas.ch
41-612-848-683
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Macromolecules
Turning waste from rice, parsley and other foods into biodegradable plastic
Your chairs, synthetic rugs and plastic bags could one day be made out of cocoa, rice and vegetable waste rather than petroleum, scientists are now reporting. The novel process they developed and their results, which could help the world deal with its agricultural and plastic waste problems, appear in the ACS journal Macromolecules.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Treating pain by blocking the 'chili-pepper receptor'
Biting into a chili pepper causes a burning spiciness that is irresistible to some, but intolerable to others. Scientists exploring the chili pepper's effect are using their findings to develop a new drug candidate for many kinds of pain, which can be caused by inflammation or other problems. They reported their progress on the compound, which is being tested in clinical trials, in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Sunblock poses potential hazard to sea life
The sweet and salty aroma of sunscreen and seawater signals a relaxing trip to the shore. But scientists are now reporting that the idyllic beach vacation comes with an environmental hitch. When certain sunblock ingredients wash off skin and into the sea, they can become toxic to some of the ocean's tiniest inhabitants, which are the main course for many other marine animals. Their study appears in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Naturwissenschaften - The Science of Nature
Worker bees 'know' when to invest in their reproductive future
When a colony of honeybees grows to about 4,000 members, it triggers an important first stage in its reproductive cycle: the building of a special type of comb used for rearing male reproductive, called drones. A team of experts from the Department of Neurobiology and Behaviour at Cornell University, led by Michael Smith, studied what starts the reproductive cycle of honeybee colonies. The results are published in Springer's journal Naturwissenschaften - The Science of Nature.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Nature
University of Tennessee research uncovers subglacial life beneath Antarctic ice sheet
University of Tennessee, Knoxville, research finds life can persist in a cold, dark world. A University of Tennessee microbiology assistant professor was part of a team that examined waters and sediments from a shallow lake deep beneath the Antarctic ice sheet and found the extreme environment supports microbial ecosystems.
National Science Foundation, NASA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Whitney Heins
wheins@utk.edu
865-974-5460
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Seafood substitutions can expose consumers to unexpectedly high mercury
New measurements from fish purchased at retail seafood counters in 10 different states show the extent to which mislabeling can expose consumers to unexpectedly high levels of mercury, a harmful pollutant. Fishery stock 'substitutions' -- which falsely present a fish of the same species, but from a different geographic origin -- are the most dangerous mislabeling offense, according to new research by University of Hawaii at Manoa scientists.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
How steroid hormones enable plants to grow
Plants can adapt extremely quickly to changes in their environment. Hormones, chemical messengers that are activated in direct response to light and temperature stimuli help them achieve this. Plant steroid hormones similar to human sex hormones play a key role here. In the current edition of Nature Communications, scientists describe a new signaling mode for the brassinosteroid class of hormones.

Contact: Barbara Wankerl
barbara.wankerl@tum.de
49-892-892-2562
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Nature Cell Biology
Researchers block plant hormone
A small molecule inhibits jasmonic acid and helps to explain its effects.

Contact: Erich Kombrink
kombrink@mpipz.mpg.de
49-221-506-2320
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
PeerJ
Sequencing at sea
Scientists overcame equipment failure, space constraints and shark-infested waters to do real-time DNA sequencing in a remote field location.

Contact: Natalia Elko
natalia.elko@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-2585
San Diego State University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Trees and shrubs invading critical grasslands, diminish cattle production
Half of the Earth's land mass is made up of rangelands, which include grasslands and savannas, yet they are being transformed at an alarming rate. Woody plants, such as trees and shrubs, are taking over, leading to a loss of critical habitat and causing a drastic change in the ability of ecosystems to produce food -- specifically meat. Researchers with Arizona State University have quantified this loss. Findings appear in today's issue of PNAS.
National Academies Keck Futures Initiative, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sandra Leander
sandra.leander@asu.edu
480-965-9865
Arizona State University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate change will threaten fish by drying out Southwest US streams, study predicts
Fish species native to a major Arizona watershed may lose access to important segments of their habitat by 2050 as surface water flow is reduced by the effects of climate warming, new research suggests.
US Department of Defense Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program

Contact: Kristin Jaeger
Jaeger.48@osu.edu
Ohio State University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bionic liquids from lignin
Bionic liquids -- solvents made from lignin and hemicellulose, two by-products of biofuel production -- show great promise for liberating fermentable sugars from lignocellulose and improving the economics of biofuels refineries.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory