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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
The Electricity Journal
Matched 'hybrid' systems may hold key to wider use of renewable energy
The use of renewable energy in the United States could take a significant leap forward with improved storage technologies or more efforts to 'match' different forms of alternative energy systems that provide an overall more steady flow of electricity, researchers say in a new report.

Contact: Joshua Merritt
merrittj@oregonstate.edu
Oregon State University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Tropical depression 21W forms, Philippines under warnings
The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite provided rainfall data as Tropical Depression 21W was making landfall in the southern Philippines on Nov. 26.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Frontiers in Marine Science
Toolkit for ocean health
One of the global leaders in ocean science, Professor Carlos Duarte has shared his insights on the future of the world's oceans in a paper published in the international open-access journal Frontiers in Marine Science.

Contact: David Stacey
david.stacey@uwa.edu.au
61-864-883-229
Frontiers

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
5th International GOCE User Workshop
Geophysical Research Letters
First harvest of research based on the final GOCE gravity model
Just four months after the final data package from ESA's GOCE satellite mission was delivered, researchers are laying out a rich harvest of scientific results at the 5th International GOCE User Workshop in Paris. The GOCE Gravity Consortium, coordinated by the Technische Universität München, produced all of the mission's data products. On this basis, studies in geophysics, geology, ocean circulation, climate change, and civil engineering are sharpening the picture of our dynamic planet.
European Space Agency

Contact: Patrick Regan
patrick.regan@tum.de
49-162-427-9876
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
Star Trek-like invisible shield found thousands of miles above Earth
A team led by the University of Colorado Boulder has discovered an invisible shield some 7,200 miles above Earth that blocks so-called 'killer electrons,' which whip around the planet at near-light speed and have been known to threaten astronauts, fry satellites and degrade space systems during intense solar storms.
NASA

Contact: Daniel Baker
daniel.baker@lasp.colorado.edu
303-492-0591
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
Modeling the past to understand the future of a stronger El Nino
El Nino is not a contemporary phenomenon; it's long been the Earth's dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Nino will respond. A team of researchers led by the University of Wisconsin's Zhengyu Liu published the latest findings in this quest Nov. 27, 2014 in Nature.

Contact: Zhengyu Liu
zliu3@wisc.edu
608-262-0777
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
Stanford engineers invent high-tech mirror to beam heat away from buildings into space
Stanford engineers have invented a material designed to help cool buildings. The material reflects incoming sunlight, and it sends heat from inside the structure directly into space as infrared radiation.

Contact: Tom Abate
tabate@stanford.edu
650-736-2245
Stanford School of Engineering

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Satellite views early Thanksgiving travel trouble areas in US
As the US Thanksgiving holiday approaches this Thursday, November 27, NOAA's GOES-East and GOES-West satellites are keeping a weather eye out for storms that may affect early travelers. In an image from Nov. 25, the satellites show an active weather pattern is in place for travelers across the central and eastern US.
NASA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
A warming world may spell bad news for honey bees
A bee parasites from exotic climates threatens UK bees. Research predicts that an exotic gut parasite could cause increasing damage to UK bees as climates warms. The spread of the parasite is linked to climate and its superior competitive ability
Insect Pollinators Initiative, UK's Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Defra, Natural Environment Research Council, Scottish Government, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Rob Dawson
rob.dawson@bbsrc.ac.uk
07-557-487-865
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Energy & Environmental Science
Researchers find way to turn sawdust into gasoline
Researchers at KU Leuven's Centre for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis have successfully converted sawdust into building blocks for gasoline. Using a new chemical process, they were able to convert the cellulose in sawdust into hydrocarbon chains. These hydrocarbons can be used as an additive in gasoline, or as a component in plastics. The researchers reported their findings in the journal Energy & Environmental Science.

Contact: Bert Lagrain
bert.lagrain@biw.kuleuven.be
32-163-21627
KU Leuven

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Better forecasts for sea ice under climate change
New research will help pinpoint the impact of waves on sea ice, which is vulnerable to climate change, particularly in the Arctic where it is rapidly retreating.

Contact: Luke Bennetts
luke.bennetts@adelaide.edu.au
61-466-457-406
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Scientists could save thousands of pounds with student's DIY microscope
Expensive tests for measuring everything from sperm motility to cancer diagnosis have just been made hundreds of thousands of pounds cheaper by a Ph.D. student from Brunel University London who hacked his own microscope.

Contact: Keith Coles
keith.coles@brunel.ac.uk
Brunel University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Soil Science Society of America Journal
Study finds way to conserve soil and water in world's driest wheat region
In the world's driest rainfed wheat region, Washington State University researchers have identified summer fallow management practices that can make all the difference for farmers, water and soil conservation, and air quality. Wheat growers in the Horse Heaven Hills of south-central Washington farm with an average of 6-8 inches of rain a year. Wind erosion has caused blowing dust that exceeded federal air quality standards 20 times in the past 10 years.
WSU Agricultural Research Center, USDA-NIFA

Contact: Bill Schillinger
william.schillinger@wsu.edu
509-235-1933
Washington State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
CT scans of coral skeletons reveal ocean acidity increases reef erosion
For coral reefs to persist, rates of reef construction must exceed reef breakdown. Prior research has largely focused on the negative impacts of ocean acidification on reef growth, but new research this week from scientists at the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology, based at the University of Hawai'i - Mānoa, demonstrates that lower ocean pH also enhances reef breakdown: a double-whammy for coral reefs in a changing climate.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Science Foundation, Sigma-Xi, and University of Hawai'i Sea Grant College Program

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Biology trumps chemistry in open ocean
Scientists laid out a new framework based on in situ observations that will allow them to describe and understand how phytoplankton assimilate limited concentrations of phosphorus, a key nutrient, in the ocean in ways that better reflect what is actually occurring in the marine environment. This is important because nutrient uptake is a property of ocean biogeochemistry, and in many regions controls carbon dioxide fixation, which ultimately can play a role in mitigating climate change.

Contact: Darlene Crist
dtcrist@bigelow.org
207-315-2567 x103
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
Unmanned underwater vehicle provides first 3-D images of underside of Antarctic sea ice
A National Science Foundation-funded research team has successfully tested an autonomous underwater vehicle, AUV, that can produce high-resolution, three-dimensional maps of Antarctic sea ice. SeaBED, as the vehicle is known, measured and mapped the underside of sea-ice floes in three areas off the Antarctic Peninsula that were previously inaccessible.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter West
pwest@nsf.gov
703-292-7530
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
USGS Open-File Report
Climate change could affect future of Lake Michigan basin
Climate change could lengthen the growing season, make soil drier and decrease winter snowpack in the Lake Michigan Basin by the turn of the century, among other hydrological effects.

Contact: Marisa Lubeck
mlubeck@usgs.gov
303-202-4765
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society
Avoiding ecosystem collapse
Three new studies describe concrete actions to prevent or reverse abrupt ecological shifts.

Contact: Kristen Weiss
kristenw@stanford.edu
831-333-2077
Stanford University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Climate Change
Global warming cynics unmoved by extreme weather
What will it take to convince skeptics of global warming that the phenomenon is real? Surely, many scientists believe, enough droughts, floods and heat waves will begin to change minds. But a new study led by a Michigan State University scholar throws cold water on that theory.

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Quaternary Science Reviews
New volume documents the science at the legendary snowmastodon fossil site in Colorado
Four years ago, a bulldozer turned over some bones at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado. Scientists from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science were called to the scene and confirmed the bones were those of a Columbian mammoth, setting off a frenzy of excavation, scientific analysis, and international media attention. This dramatic and unexpected discovery culminates this month with the publication of the Snowmastodon Project Science Volume in the international journal Quaternary Research.

Contact: Maura O'Neal
maura.oneal@dmns.org
303-370-6407
Denver Museum of Nature & Science

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Climate Change Responses
El Niño stunts children's growth in Peru
Extreme weather events, such as El Niño, can have long-lasting effects on health, according to research published in the open access journal Climate Change Responses. The study, in coastal Peru, shows that children born during and after the 1997-98 El Niño have a lower height-for-age than others born before the event.

Contact: Alanna Orpen
alanna.orpen@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2054
BioMed Central

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
Underwater robot sheds new light on Antarctic sea ice
The first detailed, high-resolution 3-D maps of Antarctic sea ice have been developed using an underwater robot. Scientists from the UK, USA and Australia say the new technology provides accurate ice thickness measurements from areas that were previously too difficult to access.

Contact: Athena Dinar
amdi@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21441
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Environmental 'tipping points' key to predicting extinctions
Researchers from North Carolina State University have created a model that mimics how differently adapted populations may respond to rapid climate change. Their findings demonstrate that depending on a population's adaptive strategy, even tiny changes in climate variability can create a 'tipping point' that sends the population into extinction.

Contact: Carlos Botero
carlos.botero.p@gmail.com
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Journal of Crustacean Biology
Fiddler on the roof?
The fiddler crab, Uca pugnax, has migrated nearly 50 miles north of its supposed natural range along the US East Coast. This may be another sign of climate change.

Contact: Diana Kenney
dkenney@mbl.edu
508-289-7139
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
GPM measured Tropical Storm Adjali's rainfall before dissipation
Moderate rainfall was occurring around the center of Tropical Storm Adjali before it dissipated, according to data from NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM satellites.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center