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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Ecology
Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance
Rising temperatures and shifting precipitation patterns may get the lion's share of our climate change attention, but predators may want to give some thought to wind, according to a University of Wisconsin Madison zoologist's study, which is among the first to demonstrate the way 'global stilling' may alter predator-prey relationships.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brandon Barton
btbarton@wisc.edu
608-262-9226
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA eyes Tropical Storm Fung-Wong move through Northwestern Pacific
Tropical Storm Fung-Wong continued to affect the Philippines while moving north through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared data on the storm's clouds that showed some high, strong thunderstorms with the potential for heavy rainfall over the northern and central regions of the country. The storm is now expected to affect three more countries over the next several days.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm playing polo with western Mexico
Tropical Storm Polo is riding along the coast of western Mexico like horses in the game of his namesake. NASA's Aqua satellite saw Polo about 300 miles south-southeast of Baja California on its track north.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA, NOAA satellites show Odile's remnant romp through southern US
Former Hurricane Odile may be a bad memory for Baja California, but the remnants have moved over New Mexico and Texas where they are expected to bring rainfall there. NASA's TRMM satellite measured Odile's heavy rainfall rates on Sept. 18, and NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw the clouds associated with the former storm continue to linger over the US Southwest on Sept. 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA catches a weaker Edouard, headed toward Azores
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Atlantic Ocean and captured a picture of Tropical Storm Edouard as it continues to weaken.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Environmental pollutants make worms susceptible to cold
Some pollutants are more harmful in a cold climate than in a hot, because they affect the temperature sensitivity of certain organisms. Now researchers from Danish universities have demonstrated how this happens, and it can help us better predict contamination risks, especially in the Arctic.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Journal of Power Sources
Researchers develop unique waste cleanup for rural areas
Washington State University researchers have developed a unique method to use microbes buried in pond sediment to power waste cleanup in rural areas. The first microbe-powered, self-sustaining wastewater treatment system could lead to an inexpensive and quick way to clean up waste from large farming operations and rural sewage treatment plants while reducing pollution.
National Science Foundation, US Office of Naval Research, Washington State University Agricultural Research Center

Contact: Haluk Beyenal
beyenal@wsu.edu
509-335-6607
Washington State University

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Microplastic pollution discovered in St. Lawrence River sediments
A team of researchers from McGill University and the Quebec government have discovered microplastics widely distributed across the bottom of the St. Lawrence River, the first time such pollutants have been found in freshwater sediments. Their research was published this month in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.

Contact: Jenny Ryan
jenny.ryan@nrcresearchpress.com
Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Agricultural fires in the Ukraine
Numerous fires -- marked with red dots -- are burning in Eastern Europe, likely as a result of regional agricultural practices.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
NASA sees western edge of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong affecting Philippines
The NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite saw the western edge of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong over the central Philippines on Sept. 18. Fung-Wong developed on Sept. 17 as Tropical Depression 16W, and strengthened into a tropical storm by 5 p.m. EDT on Sept. 17.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Fall foliage season may be later, but longer on warmer Earth
The fall foliage season in some areas of the United States could come much later and possibly last a little longer by the end of the century as climate change causes summer temperatures to linger later into the year, according to Princeton University researchers. The delay could result in a longer growing season that would affect carbon uptake, agriculture, water supplies and animal behavior, among many other areas.

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
NASA marks Polo for a hurricane
Hurricane Polo still appears rounded in imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite, but forecasters at the National Hurricane Center expect that to change.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Edouard enter cooler waters
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite and Aqua satellite gathered data on Hurricane Edouard's rainfall, clouds and waning power is it continued moving northward in the Atlantic into cooler waters. On Sept. 18, NASA's Global Hawk #872 set out to investigate Edouard again as the storm is expected to weaken to a tropical storm
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Journal of Ecology
Tropical fish a threat to Mediterranean Sea ecosystems
The tropical rabbitfish which have devastated algal forests in the eastern Mediterranean Sea pose a major threat to the entire Mediterranean basin if their distribution continues to expand as the climate warms, a new study warns. Researchers surveyed more than 1000 kilometers of coastline in Turkey and Greece, where two species of plant-eating rabbitfish have become dominant, and found regions with abundant rabbitfish had become rocky barrens.

Contact: Deborah Smith
deborah.smith@unsw.edu.au
61-047-849-2060
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Science
Changes in coastal upwelling linked to temporary declines in marine ecosystem
In findings of relevance to both conservationists and the fishing industry, new research links short-term reductions in growth and reproduction of marine animals off the California Coast to increasing variability in the strength of coastal upwelling currents -- currents which historically supply nutrients to the region's diverse ecosystem.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Shorebird's beak inspires UT Arlington research on water collection
A UT Arlington engineering professor and his doctoral student have designed a device based on a shorebird's beak that can accumulate water collected from fog and dew.

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Edouard far from US, but creating rough surf
Although NASA's Aqua satellite showed that Hurricane Edouard is far from US soil, it is powerful enough that it is creating dangerous swells along the US East Coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Polo intensifying
Tropical storm warnings now issued for a portion of the Southwestern coast of Mexico as Polo continues to strengthen. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed powerful thunderstorms around the center of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Odile soaking Mexico and southwestern US
Tropical Storm Odile continues to spread moisture and generate strong thunderstorms with heavy rainfall over northern Mexico's mainland and the Baja California as well as the southwestern US. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite measured rainfall rates from space as it passed over Odile.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Coral growth rate plummets in 30-year comparison
A team of researchers working on a Carnegie expedition in Australia's Great Barrier Reef has documented that coral growth rates have plummeted 40 percent since the mid-1970s. The scientists suggest that ocean acidification may be playing an important role in this perilous slowdown.
Moore Foundation

Contact: Ken Caldeira
kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kalmaegi weakening over Vietnam
Tropical Storm Kalmaegi made landfall on Sept. 17 near the border of Vietnam and China and moved inland. Soon after the landfall as a typhoon, NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and captured an image of the weaker tropical storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
California's King Fire east of Sacramento
California's King Fire tripled in size from Monday, Sept. 15, to Tuesday morning, Sept. 16, and current weather conditions are doing nothing more than helping it along.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Global change: Trees continue to grow at a faster rate
Trees have been growing significantly faster since the 1960s. The typical development phases of trees and stands have barely changed, but they have accelerated -- by as much as 70 percent. This was the outcome of a study carried out by scientists from Technische Universität München based on long-term data from experimental forest plots that have been continuously observed since 1870. Their findings were published recently in Nature Communications.

Contact: Barbara Wankerl
barbara.wankerl@tum.de
49-892-892-2562
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Coral Reefs
Study finds Great Barrier Reef is an effective wave absorber
New research has found that the Great Barrier Reef, as a whole, is a remarkably effective wave absorber, despite large gaps between the reefs. This means that landward of the reefs, waves are mostly related to local winds rather than offshore wave conditions.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Recruiting bacteria to be technology innovation partners
For most people biofilms conjure up images of slippery stones in a streambed and dirty drains. While there are plenty of 'bad' biofilms around, a team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University sees biofilms as a robust new platform for designer nanomaterials that could clean up polluted rivers, manufacture pharmaceutical products, fabricate new textiles, and more.
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University

Contact: Kristen Kusek
kristen.kusek@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard