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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NASA sees Himalayan snow from Cyclone Hudhud's remnants
When does a Tropical Cyclone drop snowfall? When it makes landfall in India and the moisture moves over the Himalayas as Cyclone Hudhud has done.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Water Resources Research
This week from AGU: Rainfall and landslide risk, lava lake, winds hasten glacial melting
This week, the American Geophysical Union is publishing articles about rainfall and landslide risk, lava lakes, and how winds hasten glacial melting.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology
When the isthmus is an island: Madison's hottest, and coldest, spots
In a new study published this month in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers highlight the urban heat island effect in Madison: the city's concentrated asphalt, brick and concrete lead to higher temperatures than its nonurban surroundings.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jason Schatz
jschatz2@wisc.edu
608-263-1859
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Storm Ana still affecting Hawaii
Slow-moving Tropical Storm Ana was still affecting parts of Hawaii on Oct. 20 when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead from its orbit in space.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NASA sees Gonzalo affect Bermuda's ocean sediment: Stirred, not shaken
NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites captured before and after images of Bermuda and surrounding waters before and after Hurricane Gonzalo struck the island on Oct. 17.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Frontiers in Zoology
'Shrinking goats' another indicator that climate change affects animal size
Alpine goats appear to be shrinking in size as they react to changes in climate, according to new research from Durham University.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Leighton Kitson
leighton.kitson@durham.ac.uk
44-191-334-6075
Durham University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Current Biology
The ocean's living carbon pumps
When algal blooms get viral infections, global carbon cycles are affected. Weizmann Institute scientists have identified this process in an ocean bloom.

Contact: Yivsam Azgad
news@weizmann.ac.il
972-893-43856
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
What Americans fear most -- new poll from Chapman University
The Chapman Survey on American Fears included 1,500 participants from across the nation and all walks of life. Underscoring Chapman's growth and emergence in the sciences, the research team leading this effort pared the information down into four basic categories: personal fears, crime, natural disasters and fear factors.

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
NASA's HS3 mission continues with flights over Hurricane Gonzalo
Tropical Storm Gonzalo strengthened into a hurricane on Oct. 14 when it was near Puerto Rico and provided a natural laboratory for the next phase of NASA's HS3 or Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel mission.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management
Pharmaceuticals and the water-fish-osprey food web
Ospreys do not carry significant amounts of human pharmaceutical chemicals, despite widespread occurrence of these chemicals in water, a recent U.S. Geological Survey and Baylor University study finds. These research findings, published by Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management is the first published study that examines the bioaccumulation of pharmaceuticals in the water-fish-osprey food web.

Contact: Jen Lynch
jen.lynch@setac.org
850-469-150-0109
Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Fires in the Egypt River Delta
A NASA satellite has detected a fire in the Egyptian River Delta.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
NASA's Terra Satellite sees Tropical Storm Ana over Hawaii
Tropical Storm Ana made a slow track west of the Hawaiian islands over the last couple of days, and by Oct. 20 was moving westward away from the main Hawaiian islands and heading toward the northwest Hawaiian islands. NASA's Terra satellite caught Ana on a flyby on Oct. 19 that showed the storm's clouds blanketing the chain of islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
The quick life and death of Tropical Storm Trudy
Tropical Storm Trudy formed on Saturday, Oct. 17 and by Oct.19 the storm made landfall in southern Mexico and weakened to a remnant low pressure area.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Gonzalo: First hand account in Bermuda, next stop: The United Kingdom
Hurricane Gonzalo departed from Bermuda leaving power outages, downed trees, and damaged homes and buildings. An on-the ground account of the storm indicated the eye passed over the island. By Oct. 20, post-tropical storm Gonzalo was approaching the United Kindgom, sparking severe weather warnings.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Hazardous Materials
New study charts the fate of chemicals affecting health and the environment
In a new study, Rolf Halden, PhD, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, examines the trajectory of chemicals appearing as emergent threats to human or environmental health. Halden's meta-analysis of 143,000 peer-reviewed research papers tracks the progress of these chemicals of emerging concern, revealing patters of emergence from obscurity to peak concern and eventual decline, over a span of 30 years.

Contact: RICHARD HARTH
richard.harth@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Hazardous Materials
Fish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fish
In a new study, Hansa Done, Ph.D. candidate, and Rolf Halden, Ph.D., researchers at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, examine antibiotic use in the rapidly expanding world of global aquaculture.

Contact: Richard Harth
richard.harth@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Massive debris pile reveals risk of huge tsunamis in Hawaii
A mass of marine debris discovered in a giant sinkhole in the Hawaiian islands provides evidence that at least one mammoth tsunami, larger than any in Hawaii's recorded history, has struck the islands, and that a similar disaster could happen again, new research finds. Scientists are reporting that a wall of water up to nine meters (30 feet) high surged onto Hawaiian shores about 500 years ago. A 9.0-magnitude earthquake off the coast of the Aleutian Islands triggered the mighty wave, which left behind up to nine shipping containers worth of ocean sediment in a sinkhole on the island of Kauai.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Mediterranean, semi-arid ecosystems prove resistant to climate change
Climate change predictions for the Middle East, like other arid regions of the world, are alarming. But in testing these dire predictions, Tel Aviv University ecologists found that, contrary to expectations, no measurable changes in annual vegetation could be seen. None of the crucial vegetation characteristics -- neither species richness and composition, nor density and biomass -- had changed appreciably in the course of the rainfall manipulations.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
In between red light and blue light
Diatoms play an important role in water quality and in the global climate. They generate about one fourth of the oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere and perform around one-quarter of the global CO2 assimilation, i.e. they convert carbon dioxide into organic substances. Their light receptors are a crucial factor in this process. Researchers at Leipzig University and UFZ have now discovered that blue and red light sensing photoreceptors control the carbon flow in these algae.
German Research Foundation

Contact: Tilo Arnhold
presse@ufz.de
49-341-235-1635
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Climate Change
Improved electricity access has little impact on climate change
Expanding access to household electricity services accounts for only a small portion of total emission growth, shows a new study from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, shedding light on an ongoing debate on potential conflicts between climate and development.

Contact: Katherine Leitzell
leitzell@iiasa.ac.at
43-223-680-7316
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Global Change Biology
Climate change alters cast of winter birds
Over the past two decades, the resident communities of birds that attend eastern North America's backyard bird feeders in winter have quietly been remade, most likely as a result of a warming climate.

Contact: Benjamin Zuckerberg
bzuckerberg@wisc.edu
608-263-0853
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Satellites sees a question mark in Tropical Storm Ana
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Ana that showed the outer clouds were already reaching the big island by 11 a.m. EDT and the storm resembled a giant question mark.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
NASA study finds 1934 had worst drought of last thousand years
A new study using a reconstruction of North American drought history over the last 1,000 years found that the drought of 1934 was the driest and most widespread of the last millennium.
NASA

Contact: Ellen Gray
ellen.t.gray@nasa.gov
301-286-1950
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
NASA begins sixth year of airborne Antarctic ice change study
NASA is carrying out its sixth consecutive year of Operation IceBridge research flights over Antarctica to study changes in the continent's ice sheet, glaciers and sea ice. This year's airborne campaign, which began its first flight Thursday morning, will revisit a section of the Antarctic ice sheet that recently was found to be in irreversible decline.
NASA

Contact: George Hale
George.r.hale@nasa.gov
301-614-5853
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Remote Sensing
First detailed map of aboveground forest carbon stocks in Mexico unveiled
Available for download today, the Woods Hole Research Center and Allianza MREDD+ released the first detailed map of aboveground forest carbon stocks of Mexico. This carbon stock inventory is very valuable for Mexico, as one of the first tropical nations to voluntarily pledge to mitigation actions within the context of the United Nation's Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation program.
United States Agency for International Development, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Google.org, David and Lucille Packard Foundation

Contact: Eunice Youmans
eyoumans@whrc.org
508-444-1509
Woods Hole Research Center