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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
'Fracking' in the dark: Biological fallout of shale-gas production still largely unknown
Eight conservation biologists from various organizations and institutions, including Princeton University, found that shale-gas extraction in the United States has vastly outpaced scientists' understanding of the industry's environmental impact. With shale-gas production projected to surge during the next 30 years, determining and minimizing the industry's effects on nature and wildlife must become a top priority for scientists, industry and policymakers, the researchers said.

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres
Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change
Research demonstrates that it isn't just the CO2 from biomass burning that's the problem. Black carbon and brown carbon maximize the thermal impacts of such fires. They essentially allow biomass burning to cause much more global warming per unit weight than other human-associated carbon sources.

Contact: Tom Abate
tabate@stanford.edu
650-736-2245
Stanford School of Engineering

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Nature
Certain Arctic lakes store more greenhouse gases than they release
New research, supported by the National Science Foundation, counters a widely-held scientific view that thawing permafrost uniformly accelerates atmospheric warming, indicating instead that certain Arctic lakes store more greenhouse gases than they emit into the atmosphere.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter West
pwest@nsf.gov
703-292-7530
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
NASA sees Genevieve squeezed between 3 tropical systems
The resurrected Tropical Depression Genevieve appears squeezed between three other developing areas of low pressure. Satellite data from NOAA and NASA continue to show a lot of tropical activity in the Eastern and Central Pacific Oceans on July 31.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Halong move northwest of Guam
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite passed over Guam as heavy rain fell over the island while Tropical Storm Halong's center passed just to the north of the island.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Study finds benefits to burning Flint Hills prairie in fall and winter
A new study looks at 20 years of data concerning the consequences of burning Flint Hills prairie at different times of the year. It finds that burning outside of the current late spring time frame has no measurable negative consequences for the prairie, and in fact, may have multiple benefits.

Contact: Joseph Craine
jcraine@k-state.edu
785-317-9318
Kansas State University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Social Science Research
Congressional rift over environment influences public
American citizens are increasingly divided over the issue of environmental protection and seem to be taking their cue primarily from Congress, finds new research led by a Michigan State University scholar.

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
99th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
The Rim Fire 1 year later: A natural experiment in fire ecology and management
The 2013 California Rim Fire crossed management boundaries when it burned out of the Stanislaus National Forest and into to Yosemite National Park, providing a natural demonstration of the effects of a history of fire suppression on wildfire dynamics.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
NASA catches 2 tropical troublemakers in Northwestern Pacific: Halong and 96W
There are two tropical low pressure areas in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean today and they're close enough to each other to be captured in one image generated from data gathered by NASA's Aqua satellite.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature
Antarctic ice sheet is result of CO2 decrease, not continental breakup
Climate modelers from the University of New Hampshire have shown that the most likely explanation for the initiation of Antarctic glaciation during a major climate shift 34 million years ago was decreased carbon dioxide levels. The finding counters a 40-year-old theory suggesting massive rearrangements of Earth's continents caused global cooling and the abrupt formation of the Antarctic ice sheet. It will provide scientists insight into the climate change implications of current rising global CO2 levels.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Sims
david.sims@unh.edu
603-862-5369
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Diversity and Distributions
Conservation scientists asking wrong questions on climate change impacts on wildlife
Scientists studying the potential effects of climate change on the world's animal and plant species are focusing on the wrong factors, according to a new paper by a research team from the Wildlife Conservation Society, University of Queensland, and other organizations. The authors claim that most of the conservation science is missing the point when it comes to climate change.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
NASA sees zombie Tropical Depression Genevieve reborn
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite helped confirm that the remnant low pressure area of former Tropical Storm Genevieve has become a zombie storm, and has been reborn as a tropical depression on July 30.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Biological Conservation
Saving seeds the right way can save the world's plants
Exotic pests, shrinking ranges and a changing climate threaten some of the world's most rare and ecologically important plants, and so conservationists establish seed collections to save the seeds in banks or botanical gardens in hopes of preserving some genetic diversity.
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis

Contact: Catherine Crawley
ccrawley@nimbios.org
865-974-9350
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Big data confirms climate extremes are here to stay
In a new paper, Northeastern researchers show how they've used advanced computational data science tools to demonstrate that despite global warming, we may still experience severe cold snaps due to increasing variability in temperature extremes.

Contact: Emily Bhatti
e.bhatti@neu.edu
617-373-3287
Northeastern University

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Peru's carbon quantified: Economic and conservation boon
Today scientists unveiled the first high-resolution map of the carbon stocks stored on land throughout the entire country of Peru. The new and improved methodology used to make the map marks a sea change for future market-based carbon economies. The new carbon map also reveals Peru's extremely high ecological diversity and it provides the critical input to studies of deforestation and forest degradation for conservation, land use, and enforcement purposes.

Contact: Greg Asner
gpa@carnegiescience.edu
650-380-2828
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Biogeosciences
Scientists caution against exploitation of deep ocean
The world's oceans are vast and deep, yet rapidly advancing technology and the quest for extracting resources from previously unreachable depths is beginning to put the deep seas on the cusp of peril, an international team of scientists warned this week.

Contact: Andrew Thurber
athurber@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-4500
Oregon State University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
NASA sees developing Tropical Storm Halong causing warning
NASA infrared satellite data revealed that Tropical Storm Halong is surrounded by strong thunderstorms and an eye appears to be developing.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean
The first measurements of waves in the middle of the Arctic Ocean recorded house-sized waves during a September 2012 storm. More sensors are going out this summer to study waves in newly ice-free Arctic waters.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Cell tower rain gauges, lightning channels, North Sea storm surge
This week from AGU: Cell phone tower rain gauges, lightning channels, North Sea storm surge.

Contact: Alexandra Branscombe
abranscombe@agu.org
202-777-7516
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
NASA sees warmer cloud tops as Tropical Storm Hernan degenerates
Tropical Storm Hernan degenerated into a remnant low pressure area on July 29. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed cloud tops were warming as the storm weakened.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Wildfires continue near Yellowknife, Canada
The wildfires that have been plaguing the Northern Territories in Canada and have sent smoke drifting down to the Great Lakes in the US continue on.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Biogeosciences
From 'Finding Nemo' to minerals -- what riches lie in the deep sea?
As fishing and the harvesting of metals, gas and oil expand deeper and deeper into the ocean, scientists are drawing attention to the services provided by the deep sea, the world's largest environment. 'This is the time to discuss deep-sea stewardship before exploitation is too much farther underway,' says lead author Andrew Thurber. In a review published today in Biogeosciences, Thurber and colleagues summarize what this habitat provides to humans, emphasizing the need to protect it.

Contact: Barbara Ferreira
media@egu.eu
49-892-180-6703
European Geosciences Union

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Evolution in rainforest flies points to climate change survival
Scientists believe some tropical species may be able to evolve and adapt to the effects of climate change.

Contact: Lucy Handford
media@monash.edu
Monash University

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
New research reveals Pele is powerful, even in the sky
One might assume that a tropical storm moving through volcanic smog (vog) would sweep up the tainted air and march on, unchanged. However, a recent study from atmospheric scientists at the University of Hawai'i -- Manoa revealed that, though microscopic, gasses and particles from Kilauea volcano exerted an influence on Tropical Storm Flossie -- affecting the formation of thunderstorms and lightning in the sizable storm.
US Geological Survey

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Generating a genome to feed the world: UA-led team sequences African rice
An international team of scientists led by the UA has sequenced the genome of African rice. The new information will enable scientists and agriculturalists to develop varieties of rice that can survive in a changing climate.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Rod Wing
rwing@mail.arizona.edu
520-345-2654
University of Arizona