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Atmospheric Science
Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
Pollutants from coal-burning stoves strongly associated with miscarriages in Mongolia
Burning coal for domestic heating may contribute to early fetal death according to a new study by experts from the Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia -- the coldest capital city in the world.
NIH/Fogarty International Center, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Ellin Kavanagh
ekavanagh@chla.usc.edu
323-361-8505
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Conservation priorities released for several protected areas along US-Mexico border
The CEC releases its Conservation Assessment for the Big Bend-Río Bravo Region: A Binational Collaborative Approach to Conservation, which identifies 29 priority conservation areas in a region straddling the United States-Mexico border that includes 11 different protected areas in the states of Texas, Coahuila, and Chihuahua. This region features highly diverse arid and semi-arid habitats inhabited by endangered plants and animals, and provides a vital migratory stopping point for many species of birds and animals.
Commission for Environmental Cooperation

Contact: Megan Ainscow
mainscow@cec.org
514-350-4331
Commission for Environmental Cooperation

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Increased infrastructure required for effective oil spill response in US Arctic
A changing climate is increasing the accessibility of US Arctic waters to commercial activities such as shipping, oil and gas development, and tourism, raising concern about the risk of oil spills.

Contact: Lauren Rugani
news@nas.edu
202-334-2138
National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
NASA sees last vestiges of Tropical Depression Jack
Tropical Cyclone Jack had weakened to a tropical depression when NASA and JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite passed above on April 22, 2014.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
AGU: Odds of storm waters overflowing Manhattan seawall up 20-fold, new study shows
Maximum water levels in New York harbor during major storms have risen by nearly two and a half feet since the mid-1800s, making the chances of water overtopping the Manhattan seawall now at least 20 times greater than they were 170 years ago, according to a new study.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
How to avoid water wars between 'fracking' industry and residents
The shale gas boom has transformed the energy landscape in the US, but in some drier locations, it could cause conflict among the energy industry, residents and agricultural interests over already-scarce water resources, say researchers. They add that degraded water quality is a potential risk unless there are adequate safeguards. The feature article appears in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Geology
New discovery helps solve mystery source of African lava
Floods of molten lava may sound like the stuff of apocalyptic theorists, but history is littered with evidence of such past events where vast lava outpourings originating deep in the Earth accompany the breakup of continents.

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Fires in the Primorsky Province of Russia
The uncontrolled method of managing agricultural areas each year turns the entire southern tip of Primorsky Province into an enormous firebed, enveloping up to 40 percent of the entire territory.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
NASA gets 2 last looks at Tropical Cyclone Jack
Tropical Cyclone Jack lost its credentials today, April 22, as it no longer qualified as a tropical cyclone. However, before it weakened, NASA's TRMM satellite took a 'second look' at the storm yesterday.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
NREL unlocking secrets of new solar material
A new solar material that has the same crystal structure as a mineral first found in the Ural Mountains in 1839 is shooting up the efficiency charts faster than almost anything researchers have seen before -- and it is generating optimism that a less expensive way of using sunlight to generate electricity may be in our planet's future.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Wildlife response to climate change is likely underestimated, experts warn
Analyzing thousands of breeding bird surveys sent in by citizen scientists over 35 years, wildlife researchers report that most of the 40 songbird species they studied shifted either northward or toward higher elevation in response to climate change, but did not necessarily do both. This means that most previous studies of potential climate change impacts on wildlife that looked only at one factor or the other have likely underestimated effects.
US Forest Service Northern Research Station

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Methods in Ecology and Evolution
UV-radiation data to help ecological research
Researchers at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research have processed existing data on global UV-B radiation in such a way that scientists can use them to find answers to many ecological questions. According to the paper published in Methods in Ecology and Evolution, an online journal of the British Ecological Society, this data set allows drawing new conclusions about the global distribution of animal and plant species.

Contact: Michael Beckmann
michael.beckmann@ufz.de
49-034-123-51946
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Local Solutions: Northeast Climate Change Preparedness Conference
Minnesota projects offer hope and practical help to communities facing more extreme storms
A 10-year-old program in the Midwest and New England works with communities to prepare for more extreme storms. The program is important because results are specific to each local community. It helps communities plan for the extreme storms that already are occurring more frequently, and shows how to manage the uncertainty of long-term projections. Portions of existing drainage systems are already undersized, and portions should be adequate even for pessimistic future conditions.
NOAA

Contact: Latham Stack
lstack@syntectic.com
503-901-1939
Syntectic International LLC

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Today's Antarctic region once as hot as California, Florida
Parts of ancient Antarctica were as warm as today's California coast, and polar regions of the southern Pacific Ocean registered 21st-century Florida heat, according to scientists using a new way to measure past temperatures.
National Science Foundation, Statoil, European Research Council

Contact: Eric Gershon
eric.gershon@yale.edu
203-415-3108
Yale University

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Krypton-dating technique allows researchers to accurately date ancient Antarctic ice
A team of scientists, funded by the National Science Foundation, has successfully used a new technique to confirm the age of a 120,000-year-old sample of Antarctic ice.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter West
pwest@nsf.gov
703-292-7530
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
NASA sees wind shear affecting newborn Tropical Cyclone Jack
Tropical Cyclone Jack may have hurricane-force winds today, April 21, but strong vertical wind shear is expected to weaken the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ecology team improves understanding of valley-wide stream chemistry
Understanding the chemistry of streams at a finer scale could help to identify factors impairing water quality and help protect aquatic ecosystems.
National Science Foundation, A.W. Mellon Foundation

Contact: Kevin McGuire
kevin.mcguire@vt.edu
540-231-6017
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists successfully use krypton to accurately date ancient Antarctic ice
A team of scientists has successfully identified the age of 120,000-year-old Antarctic ice using radiometric krypton dating -- a new technique that may allow them to locate and date ice that is more than a million years old. This will allow them to reconstruct the climate much farther back into Earth's history and potentially understand the mechanisms that have triggered the planet to shift into and out of ice ages.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Christo Buizert
buizertc@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1209
Oregon State University

Public Release: 20-Apr-2014
Nature Climate Change
Study casts doubt on climate benefit of biofuels from corn residue
Biofuels made from corn stover -- stalks, leaves and cobs that remain after harvest -- appear to emit more carbon dioxide over their life cycle than federal standards allow, according to research led by Adam Liska, assistant professor of biological engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Adam Liska
aliska2@unl.edu
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Science
Researchers find 3-million-year-old landscape beneath Greenland ice sheet
Glaciers and ice sheets are commonly thought to work like a belt sander. As they move over the land they scrape off everything -- vegetation, soil and even the top layer of bedrock. So a team of university scientists and a NASA colleague were greatly surprised to discover an ancient tundra landscape preserved under the Greenland ice sheet, below two miles of ice.
NASA, University of Vermont

Contact: Maria-Jose Vinas-Garcia
maria-jose.vinasgarcia@nasa.gov
301-614-5883
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Soil Science Society of America Journal
Researchers question published no-till soil organic carbon sequestration rates
For the past 20 years, researchers have published soil organic carbon sequestration rates. Many of the research findings have suggested that soil organic carbon can be sequestered by simply switching from moldboard or conventional tillage systems to no-till systems. However, there is a growing body of research with evidence that no-till systems in corn and soybean rotations without cover crops, small grains, and forages may not be increasing soil organic carbon stocks at the published rates.

Contact: Debra Levey Larson
dlarson@illinois.edu
217-244-2880
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
New Phytologist
Plants with dormant seeds give rise to more species
Seeds that sprout as soon as they're planted may be good news for a garden. But in the wild, a plant whose seeds sprouted at the first warm spell or rainy day would risk disaster. More than just an insurance policy against late frosts or unexpected dry spells, it turns out that seed dormancy has long-term advantages too: plants whose seeds put off sprouting until conditions are more certain give rise to more species.

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
rsmith@nescent.org
919-668-4544
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Science
Frozen in time: 3-million-year-old landscape still exists beneath the Greenland ice sheet
Some of the landscape underlying the massive Greenland ice sheet may have been undisturbed for almost 3 million years, ever since the island became completely ice-covered, according to researchers funded by the National Science Foundation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
ASU researchers urge alternative identification methods for threatened species
With global climate change and rapidly disappearing habitat critical to the survival of endangered species, there is a sense of urgency to confirm the return of animals thought to be extinct, or to confirm the presence of newly discovered species. Researchers at Arizona State University and Plymouth University want to change how biologists think about collecting 'voucher' specimens for species identification, suggesting current specimen collection practices pose a risk to vulnerable animal populations nearing extinction.

Contact: Sandra Leander
sandra.leander@asu.edu
480-965-9865
Arizona State University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Nature Geoscience
Methane climate change risk suggested by proof of redox cycling of humic substances
Disruption of natural methane-binding process may worsen climate change.

Contact: Press Office
press@goldschmidt2013.org
European Association of Geochemistry