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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Smoke from Canadian fires hover over Great Lakes
Canadian wildfires have been raging this summer and some of the smoke from those fires is drifting downward into the US.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Burn scars in Eastern Russia
The burn scars on this false-color image from the Terra satellite show the different areas that have been affected by this year's rash of wildfires in Eastern Russia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Tropical Storm Genevieve forms in Eastern Pacific
The seventh tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean formed and quickly ramped up to a tropical storm named 'Genevieve.' The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of the newborn storm being trailed by two other areas of developing low pressure to its east.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Environmental Research Letters
Climate change increases risk of crop slowdown in next 20 years
The world faces a small but substantially increased risk over the next two decades of a major slowdown in the growth of global corn and wheat yields because of climate change, according to National Center for Atmospheric Research and Stanford University research. Such a slowdown would occur as global demand for crops rapidly increases.
National Science Foundation, Department of Energy

Contact: David Hosansky, NCAR/UCAR Media Relations
hosansky@ucar.edu
303-497-8611
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
NASA maps Typhoon Matmo's Taiwan deluge
When Typhoon Matmo crossed over the island nation of Taiwan it left tremendous amounts of rainfall in its wake. NASA used data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite to calculate just how much rain fell over the nation.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Nature Scientific Reports
NSU researcher part of team studying ways to better predict intensity of hurricanes
While predicting the path of hurricanes has gotten better, little has been done to improve predicting a storm's intensity. That is, until now.
Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative, Consortium for Advanced Research on the Transport of Hydrocarbons in the Environment

Contact: Joe Donzelli
jdonzelli@nova.edu
954-262-2159
Nova Southeastern University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
New study draws links between wildlife loss and social conflicts
Citing many sobering examples of how wildlife loss leads to conflict among people around the world, a new article co-authored by Wildlife Conservation Society Health & Ecosystems: Analysis of Linkages program director Dr. Christopher Golden, calls for an interdisciplinary approach to tackle global biodiversity decline.

Contact: Scott Smith
ssmith@wcs.org
718-220-3698
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Energy
Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun
New Stanford research outlines the path to a possible future for California in which renewable energy creates a healthier environment, generates jobs and stabilizes energy prices.

Contact: Mark Z. Jacobson
jacobson@stanford.edu
650-723-6836
Stanford University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Rutgers study explores attitudes, preferences toward post-Sandy rebuilding
A year-long Rutgers study found that individual property owners in Sandy-affected towns are skeptical about the likelihood of community-based rebuilding solutions. 45 percent of 400-plus respondents are pessimistic their towns would be rebuilt better than they were before Sandy.
New Jersey Recovery Fund

Contact: Steve Manas
smanas@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0559
Rutgers University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of the Air and Water Association
Study gives new perspective on agricultural plastic, debris burning, and air quality
A recent study published in the Journal of the Air and Water Association shows that inclusion of agricultural plastic in debris piles has no effect on smoke emissions.

Contact: Walita Kay Williams
walitakwilliams@fs.fed.us
510-559-6367
USDA Forest Service - Pacific Southwest Research Station

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Fires in Central Africa during July 2014
Hundreds of fires covered central Africa in mid-July 2014, as the annual fire season continues across the region.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Environmental Pollution
Corn and soy insecticides similar to nicotine found widespread in Midwest rivers -- USGS news
Insecticides similar to nicotine, known as neonicotinoids, were found commonly in streams throughout the Midwest, according to a new USGS study. This is the first broad-scale investigation of neonicotinoid insecticides in the Midwestern United States and one of the first conducted within the United States.
US Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program

Contact: Alex Demas
apdemas@usgs.gov
703-648-4421
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Four-billion-year-old chemistry in cells today
Parts of the primordial soup in which life arose have been maintained in our cells today according to scientists at the University of East Anglia. Research published today in the Journal of Biological Chemistry reveals how cells in plants, yeast and very likely also in animals still perform ancient reactions thought to have been responsible for the origin of life -- some four billion years ago.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Noise pollution impacts fish species differently
Acoustic disturbance has different effects on different species of fish, according to a new study from the universities of Bristol and Exeter which tested fish anti-predator behavior.

Contact: Philippa Walker
press-office@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-7777
University of Bristol

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
Synchronization of North Atlantic, North Pacific preceded abrupt warming, end of ice age
Scientists have long been concerned that global warming may push Earth's climate system across a 'tipping point,' where rapid melting of ice and further warming may become irreversible -- a hotly debated scenario with an unclear picture of what this point of no return may look like. A new study suggests that combined warming of the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans thousands of years ago may have provided the tipping point for abrupt warming and rapid melting of the northern ice sheets.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Summer Praetorius
spraetorius@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-6159
Oregon State University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Fires in the Northern Territories July 2014
Environment Canada has issued a high health risk warning for Yellowknife and surrounding area because of heavy smoke in the region due to forest fires. In the image taken by the Aqua satellite, the smoke is drifting eastward along normal wind patterns. Fire is an obvious health hazard, but the smoke that comes from fires is not quite so obvious and its effects are insidious.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Satellite shows Atlantic tropical depression degenerate
NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured imagery of the Atlantic Ocean's Tropical Depression 2 is it degenerated into a tropical wave on July 23.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature Climate Change
Climate change and the soil
The planet's soil releases about 60 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year, which is far more than that released by burning fossil fuels. Short-term warming studies have documented that rising temperatures increase the rate of soil respiration. As a result, scientists have worried that global warming would accelerate the decomposition of carbon in the soil, releasing more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and accelerating global warming.
National Science Foundation, College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Carnegie Institution for Science

Contact: Greg Asner
gpa@carnegiescience.edu
650-380-2828
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Research charts the ecological impact of microbial respiration in the oxygen-starved ocean
A sulfur-oxidizing bacterial group called SUP05 will play an increasingly important role in carbon and nutrient cycling in the world's oceans as oxygen minimum zones expand, according to research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Contact: Chris Balma
balma@science.ubc.ca
604-822-5082
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Environmental and Experimental Botany
An increase in temperature by 2050 may be advantageous to the growth of forage plants
A 2°C increase in temperature around the world by 2050, according to one of the scenarios predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, may be advantageous to the physiology and the biochemical and biophysical processes involved in the growth of forage plants such as Stylosanthes capitata Vogel, a legume utilized for livestock grazing in tropical countries such as Brazil.
São Paulo Research Foundation

Contact: Samuel Antenor
samuel@fapesp.br
55-113-838-4381
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Urban heat boosts some pest populations 200-fold, killing red maples
New research shows that urban 'heat islands' are slowly killing red maples in the southeastern United States. One factor is that researchers have found warmer temperatures increase the number of young produced by the gloomy scale insect -- a significant tree pest -- by 300 percent, which in turn leads to 200 times more adult gloomy scales on urban trees.
Department of the Interior's Southeast Climate Science Center, US Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Environmental Science and Technology
The geography of the global electronic waste ('e-waste') burden
As local and national governments struggle to deal with ever-growing piles of electronic waste, scientists are now refining the picture of just how much there is and where it really ends up. Published in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, their study found that nearly a quarter of e-waste that developed countries discard floods into just seven developing countries -- with major potential health risks for the people who live there.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
K computer runs largest ever ensemble simulation of global weather
Using Japan's flagship 10-petaFLOPS K computer, researchers from the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science have succeeded in running 10,240 parallel simulations of global weather, the largest number ever performed, using data assimilation to reduce the range of uncertainties.

Contact: Jens Wilkinson
jens.wilkinson@riken.jp
81-048-462-1225
RIKEN

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
Genetic study shows major impact of climate change on Antarctic fur seals
Genetic analysis of Antarctic fur seals, alongside decades of in-depth monitoring, has provided unique insights into the effect of climate change on a population of top-predators. Published in Nature this week, the findings show that the seals have significantly altered in accordance with changes in food availability that are associated with climate conditions. Despite a shift in the population towards 'fitter' individuals, this fitness is not passing down through generations, leaving the population in decline.
British Antarctic Survey Natural Environment Research Council, Marie Curie FP7 Reintegration Grant, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Paul Seagrove
psea@bas.ac.uk
44-012-232-21414
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Strengthening community forest rights is critical tool to fight climate change: New report
Strengthening community forest rights is an essential strategy to reduce billions of tonnes of carbon emissions, making it an effective way for governments to meet climate goals, safeguard forests and protect the livelihoods of their citizens, according to a major new report. The paper provides the most comprehensive analysis to date linking legal recognition and government protection of community forest rights with reductions in carbon pollution.
World Resources Institute, Rights and Resources Initiative

Contact: Rhys Gerholdt
rgerholdt@wri.org
202-341-1323
Burness Communications