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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Some like it loud
Species of poison frogs that utilize bright warning coloration as protection from predators are more likely to develop louder, more complex calls than relatives that rely on camouflage. New research indicates that because these visual cues establish certain species as unsavory prey, they are free to make noisy calls in plain sight and better attract possible mates.
National Science Foundation, National Evolutionary Synthesis Center

Contact: Nicole Duncan
nicole.duncan@nescent.org
919-668-7993
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Marine Policy
Law of the Sea authorizes animal tagging research without nations' consent
Scientists who study migratory marine animals can rarely predict where the animals' paths will lead. In a new paper, Duke researchers argue that coastal nations don't have precedent under the law of the sea to require scientists to seek advance permission to remotely track tagged animals who may enter their waters. Requiring advance consent undermines the goals of the law, which is meant to encourage scientific research for conservation of marine animals.
Mary Derrickson McCurdy Visiting Scholar Program, Duke University Marine Laboratory

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
New study finds options for climate change policy are well characterized
Policy options for climate change risk management are straightforward and have well understood strengths and weaknesses, according to a new study by the American Meteorological Society Policy Program.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., Lockheed Martin

Contact: Yael Seid-Green
yseidgreen@ametsoc.org
202-355-9821
American Meteorological Society

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Genetics in Medicine
Clues to genetics of congenital heart defects emerge from Down syndrome study
The largest genetic study of congenital heart defects in individuals with Down syndrome found a connection to rare, large genetic deletions affecting cilia.
NIH/Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
New hope for drug discovery in African sleeping sickness
The neglected trop­ical dis­ease affects tens of thou­sands of people and is mostly fatal. Now, new research co-​​authored by North­eastern chem­istry pro­fessor Michael Pol­lastri has iden­ti­fied hun­dreds of chem­ical com­pounds that could lead to a cure.

Contact: Casey Bayer
c.bayer@neu.edu
617-373-2592
Northeastern University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
European Spine Journal
New findings will improve the sex lives of women with back problems
Newly published findings from the University of Waterloo are giving women with bad backs renewed hope for better sex lives. The findings -- part of the first-ever study to document how the spine moves during sex -- outline which sex positions are best for women suffering from different types of low-back pain. The new recommendations follow on the heels of comparable guidelines for men released last month.

Contact: Pamela Smyth
psmyth@uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4777
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Genes & Development
A new dent in HIV-1's armor
Salk scientists identify a promising target for HIV/AIDS treatment.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, Blasker-Rose-Miah Fund Margaret T. Morris Foundation

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Climate change impacts countered by stricter fisheries management
A new study has found that implementing stricter fisheries management overcame the expected detrimental effects of climate change disturbances in coral reef fisheries badly impacted by the 1997/98 El Niño, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Molecular beacons shine light on how cells 'crawl'
Chemists have devised a method using DNA-based tension probes to zoom in at the molecular level and measure and map how cells mechanically sense their environments, migrate and adhere to things.

Contact: Megan McRainey
megan.mcrainey@emory.edu
404-727-6171
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
PeerJ
Ebola's evolutionary roots are more ancient than previously thought, study finds
A new study is helping to rewrite Ebola's family history. The research shows that Ebola and Marburg are each members of ancient evolutionary lines, and that these two viruses last shared a common ancestor sometime prior to 16-23 million years ago.

Contact: Charlotte Hsu
chsu22@buffalo.edu
716-645-4655
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
BMC Biology
Decrease of genetic diversity in the endangered Saimaa ringed seal continues
The critically endangered Saimaa ringed seal, which inhabits Lake Saimaa in Finland, has extremely low genetic diversity and this development seems to continue, according to a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland.

Contact: Mia Valtonen
mia.valtonen@uef.fi
358-504-424-404
University of Eastern Finland

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
Cat dentals fill you with dread?
A survey published this year found that over 50 percent of final year veterinary students in the UK do not feel confident either in discussing orodental problems with clients or in performing a detailed examination of the oral cavity of their small animal patients. Once in practice, things don't always improve and, anecdotally, it seems many vets dread feline dental procedures.

Contact: Katie Baker
katie.baker@sagepub.co.uk
020-732-48719
SAGE Publications

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
IARU Sustainability Science Congress
Global boom in hydropower expected this decade
An unprecedented boom in hydropower dam construction is underway, primarily in developing countries and emerging economies. While this is expected to double the global electricity production from hydropower, it could reduce the number of our last remaining large free-flowing rivers by about 20 percent and pose a serious threat to freshwater biodiversity.

Contact: Elisabeth Wulffeld
elisabethw@snm.ku.dk
45-21-17-91-40
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
International Journal of Cardiology
Shutting off blood supply to an extremity to protect the heart
Shutting off the blood supply to an arm or a leg before cardiac surgery protects the heart during the operation. Researchers have looked into heart muscle cells of the left chamber of the heart to understand how activation of the body's very own defense mechanisms may protect the heart in times of reduced oxygen supply.

Contact: Katrine Hordnes Slagsvold
katrine.hordnes@ntnu.no
47-911-67717
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Stem Cells
Scientists engineer toxin-secreting stem cells to treat brain tumors
Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a new way to use stem cells in the fight against brain cancer. A team led by neuroscientist Khalid Shah, M.S., Ph.D., who recently demonstrated the value of stem cells loaded with cancer-killing herpes viruses, now has a way to genetically engineer stem cells so that they can produce and secrete tumor-killing toxins.
National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnell Foundation

Contact: Joseph Caputo
joseph_caputo@harvard.edu
617-496-1491
Harvard University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS Pathogens
To wilt or not to wilt
Plant breeders have long identified and cultivated disease-resistant varieties. A research team at the University of California, Riverside has now revealed a new molecular mechanism for resistance and susceptibility to a common fungus that causes wilt in susceptible tomato plants.
Los Alamos National Laboratory-UC Riverside Collaborative Program in Infectious Disease.

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Environmental Psychology
Nation's 'personality' influences its environmental stewardship, shows new study
Countries with higher levels of compassion and openness score better when it comes to environmental sustainability, says research from the University of Toronto.
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

Contact: Ken McGuffin
mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Bodies at sea: Ocean oxygen levels may impact scavenger response
An ocean's oxygen levels may play a role in the impact of marine predators on bodies when they are immersed in the sea, according to Simon Fraser University researchers, who deployed a trio of pig carcasses into Saanich Inlet off Vancouver Island and studied them using an underwater camera via the internet.
Canadian Police Research Centre

Contact: Gail Anderson
ganderso@sfu.ca
778-782-3589
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
Synthetic biology on ordinary paper, results off the page
Two breakthroughs clenched by Wyss scientists, paper–based synthetic gene networks and toehold switch gene regulators, could each have revolutionary impacts on synthetic biology: the former brings synthetic biology out of the traditional confinement of a living cell, the latter provides a rational design framework to enable de-novo design of both the parts and the network of gene regulation.

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
Experimental breast cancer drug holds promise in combination therapy for Ewing sarcoma
Ewing sarcoma tumors disappeared and did not return in more than 70 percent of mice treated with combination therapy that included drugs from a family of experimental agents developed to fight breast cancer, reported St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Tully Family Foundation, ALSAC

Contact: Summer Freeman
summer.freeman@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
HortTechnology
Helping sweet cherries survive the long haul
Research into the effectiveness of hydrocooling of sweet cherries at commercial packing houses determined the need for post-packing cooling. Analyses determined that core temperatures achieved by in-line hydrocoolers during packing did not reduce temperatures sufficiently to ensure good quality retention over the longer periods of time required for container shipping to export markets. The study recommends forced-air cooling to further reduce sweet cherry temperatures in the box before shipping.

Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
TCGA study improves understanding of genetic drivers of thyroid cancer
An analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas -- the most common form of thyroid cancer -- provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other alterations driving disease development. The findings also may help improve diagnosis and treatment. Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified new molecular subtypes that will help clinicians determine which tumors are more aggressive and which are more likely to respond to certain treatments.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Steven Benowitz
steven.benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Appetite
Changes at the grocery store could turn the burden of shopping with children on its head
Avoiding power struggles in the grocery store with children begging for sweets, chips and other junk foods -- and parents often giving in -- could be helped by placing the healthier options at the eye level of children and moving the unhealthy ones out of the way.
Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, GRACE Communications Foundation

Contact: Barbara Benham
bbenham1@jhu.edu
410-614-6029
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Fires in the southern United States
In this image taken by the Aqua satellite of the southern United States actively burning areas as detected by MODIS's thermal bands are outlined in red.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Biomacromolecules
NYU researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber
Researchers have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their work has taken place on the nanoscale. For the first time, this achievement has been realized on the microscale -- a leap of magnitude in size that presents significant new opportunities for using engineered protein fibers.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering