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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Clipping proteins that package genes may limit abnormal cell growth in tumors
Changes to the structure of the protein histone H3.3 may play a key role in silencing genes that regulate cancer cell growth.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, University of Cambridge, Cancer Research UK, Hutchinson Whampoa and the Human Frontier Science Program, Ellison Medical Foundation, Developmental Research Pilot Project Program at Mount Sinai

Contact: Lucia Lee
lucia.lee@mountsinai.org
212-241-7445
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Applied Physics Letters
New terahertz device could strengthen security
We are all familiar with the security hassles that accompany air travel. Now a new type of security detection that uses terahertz radiation is looking to prove its promise. Northwestern University researchers have developed a room temperature, compact, tunable terahertz source that could lead to advances in homeland security and space exploration. Able to detect explosives, chemical agents and dangerous biological substances from safe distances, devices using terahertz waves could make public spaces more secure than ever.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Homeland Security, Naval Air Systems Command, NASA

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Journal of the Botanical Research Institute of Texas
Rare new species of plant: Stachys caroliniana
University of South Carolina professor John Nelson knows you don't have to travel to a remote Amazon rainforest to discover a new species of plant. He and alumnus Douglas Rayner uncovered a rare hedge-nettle just 50 miles from Charleston, and they named it Stachys caroliniana, after the only state where it has been found.

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Next-door leopards: First GPS-collar study reveals how leopards live with people
In the first-ever GPS-based study of leopards in India, led by WCS and partners has delved into the secret lives of these big cats, and recorded their strategies to thrive in human-dominated areas.

Contact: Stephen Sautner
ssautner@wcs.org
718-220-3682
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
More genetic clues found in a severe food allergy
Scientists have identified four new genes associated with the severe food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Because the genes appear to have roles in other allergic diseases and in inflammation, the findings may point toward potential new treatments for EoE.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Food Phight for Eosinophilic Esophagitis, Adele S. and Daniel S. Kubert Estate

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
eLife
Life's extremists may be an untapped source of antibacterial drugs
Life's extremists, a family of microbes called Archaea, may be an untapped source of new antibacterial drugs. That conclusion arises from the discovery of the first antibacterial gene in this ancient lineage.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Communication Research
Not all baseball stars treated equally in TV steroid coverage, says study of network news
Retired baseball stars Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro each had Hall of Fame-worthy numbers, each hitting more than 500 home runs. All three also were tarred by allegations of steroid use. Their stories, however, received very different treatment over 12 years of national television news coverage, says University of Illinois professor Brian Quick, lead author on a paper about that coverage and its effects, published online Nov. 20 by the journal Communication Research.

Contact: Craig Chamberlain
cdchambe@illinois.edu
217-333-2894
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Plant Journal
Researchers discover natural resistance gene against spruce budworm
Scientists from Université Laval, the University of British Columbia and the University of Oxford have discovered a natural resistance gene against spruce budworm in the white spruce. The breakthrough, reported in The Plant Journal, paves the way to identifying and selecting naturally resistant trees to replant forests devastated by the destructive pest.

Contact: Jean-François Huppé
jean-francois.huppe@dc.ulaval.ca
418-656-7785
Université Laval

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
HortScience
Polyethylene mulch, glazing create optimal conditions for soil solarization
Researchers raised soil temperatures in high tunnels in southern Arizona to determine the efficacy of soil solarization using clear mulch on the soil surface and with tunnel glazing or with no glazing. Outcomes showed that producers using high tunnels in the region can complete solarization in less than a week during summer when the soil is fallow using glazing on the high tunnel and polyethylene mulch on the soil surface.

Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
HortScience
Vermicompost leachate improves tomato seedling growth
A study assessed growth performance of tomato seedlings treated with vermicompost-leachate (VCL), an organic liquid produced from earthworm-digested material. Seedlings were subjected to various temperature and watering regimes. Results showed that VCL can be a suitable soil amendment product to improve overall soil fertility and growth of tomato plants, even under temperature and water stress conditions.

Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering
Researchers study impact of power prosthetic failures on amputees
Powered lower limb prosthetics hold promise for improving the mobility of amputees, but errors in the technology may also cause some users to stumble or fall. New research examines exactly what happens when these technologies fail, with the goal of developing a new generation of more robust powered prostheses.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Defense, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 -Geneva, 21-22 November
Annals of Oncology
Immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in brain cancers
New evidence that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma and brain metastases presented at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 -Geneva, 21-22 November
Annals of Oncology
Possibilities for personalized vaccines revealed at ESMO symposium
The possibilities for personalized vaccines in all types of cancer are revealed today at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Study: Doubling saturated fat in the diet does not increase saturated fat in blood
Doubling saturated fat in the diet does not drive up total levels of saturated fat in the blood, according to a controlled diet study. However, increasing levels of carbohydrates in the diet during the study promoted a steady increase in the blood of a fatty acid linked to an elevated risk for diabetes and heart disease.
Dairy Research Institute, National Cattlemen's Beef Association, Egg Nutrition Center

Contact: Jeff Volek
Volek.1@osu.edu
614-688-1701
Ohio State University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nail stem cells prove more versatile than press ons
There are plenty of body parts that don't grow back when you lose them. Nails are an exception, and a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science reveals some of the reasons why.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Contact: Cristy Lytal
lytal@med.usc.edu
323-442-2172
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Neuron
TSRI researchers find how mutant gene can cause deafness
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have discovered how one gene is essential to hearing, uncovering a cause of deafness and suggesting new avenues for therapies.
National Institutes of Health, Dorris Neuroscience Center, Skaggs Insitute for Chemical Biology, Bundy Foundation

Contact: Madeline McCurry Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Angewandte Chemie
UC Irvine-Italian researchers create first inhibitor for enzyme linked to cancers
Recent studies showing acid ceramidase (AC) to be upregulated in melanoma, lung and prostate cancers have made the enzyme a desired target for novel synthetic inhibitor compounds. This week in Angewandte Chemie, a top journal in chemistry, UC Irvine and Italian Institute of Technology scientists describe the very first class of AC inhibitors that may aid in the efficacy of chemotherapies.
Carlsberg Foundation

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Restoration Ecology
New study: Aggressive conifer removal benefits Sierra aspen
Most of the aspen stands that dotted the Sierra Nevada less than a century ago are gone or are in poor health. A study just published by Point Blue Conservation Science shows the benefits of using aggressive mechanical treatment to restore Sierra aspen.

Contact: Melissa Pitkin
mpitkin@pointblue.org
831-423-8202
Point Blue Conservation Science

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
Halting the hijacker: Cellular targets to thwart influenza virus infection
In a comprehensive new study published today in the journal Cell Host and Microbe, the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Yoshihiro Kawaoka and a team of researchers have revealed methods for thwarting influenza viruses by shutting down the cellular machinery they need, like cutting the fuel line on a bank robber's getaway car.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease Public Health Service, ERATO, Strategic Basic Research Programs of Japan Science and Technology Agency

Contact: Yoshihiro Kawaoka
kawaokay@svm.vetmed.wisc.edu
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
NeuroImage
Imagination, reality flow in opposite directions in the brain
As real as that daydream may seem, its path through your brain runs opposite reality. Aiming to discern discrete neural circuits, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have tracked electrical activity in the brains of people who alternately imagined scenes or watched videos.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Barry Van Veen
vanveen@engr.wisc.edu
608-265-2488
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
New device reduces scarring in damaged blood vessels
The device developed at Northwestern University contains a form of vitamin A that controls inflammatory responses, preventing scar tissue formation and promoting wound healing.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Immunity
The STING of radiation
A team of researchers led by Ludwig Chicago's Yang-Xin Fu and Ralph Weichselbaum has uncovered the primary signaling mechanisms and cellular interactions that drive immune responses against tumors treated with radiotherapy. Published in the current issue of Immunity, their study suggests novel strategies for boosting the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and for combining it with therapies that harness the immune system to treat cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Ludwig Cancer Research, The Foglia Foundation

Contact: Rachel Steinhardt
rsteinhardt@licr.org
212-450-1582
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
The Veterinary Journal
Biomarker could provide early warning of kidney disease in cats
Researchers have developed a new biomarker called 'SDMA' that can provide earlier identification of chronic kidney disease in cats, which is one of the leading causes of their death. When a test is commercialized, it could help pet owners add months or years to the life of their cat.
Hill's Pet Nutrition, Inc.

Contact: Jean Hall
jean.hall@oregonstate.edu
541-737-6537
Oregon State University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Global Environmental Change
Study: Volunteering can help save wildlife
Participation of non-scientists as volunteers in conservation can play a significant role in saving wildlife, finds a new scientific research led by Duke University, USA, in collaboration with Wildlife Conservation Society and Centre for Wildlife Studies, Bengaluru.

Contact: Stephen Sautner
ssautner@wcs.org
718-220-3682
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Immunity
Every step you take: STING pathway key to tumor immunity
A protein complex known as STING plays a crucial role in detecting the presence of tumor cells and promoting an aggressive anti-tumor response by the body's innate immune system, according to two separate studies in Immunity. The results have major implications for the growing field of cancer immunotherapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Ludwig Cancer Research, Foglia Family Foundation

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center