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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
99th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Fire ecology manipulation by California native cultures
Before the colonial era, 100,000s of people lived on the land now called California, and many of their cultures manipulated fire to control the availability of plants they used for food, fuel, tools, and ritual. Contemporary tribes continue to use fire to maintain desired habitat and natural resources.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Environmental Pollution
First national study finds trees saving lives, reducing respiratory problems
In the first broad-scale estimate of air pollution removal by trees nationwide, US Forest Service scientists and collaborators calculated that trees are saving more than 850 human lives a year and preventing 670,000 incidences of acute respiratory symptoms.

Contact: Jane Hodgins
jmhodgins@fs.fed.us
651-649-5281
USDA Forest Service - Northern Research Station

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Smoke from Canadian fires hover over Great Lakes
Canadian wildfires have been raging this summer and some of the smoke from those fires is drifting downward into the US.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Burn scars in Eastern Russia
The burn scars on this false-color image from the Terra satellite show the different areas that have been affected by this year's rash of wildfires in Eastern Russia.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
International Journal of Cancer
Clearing cells to prevent cervical cancer
A study published online in the International Journal of Cancer earlier this month describes a novel approach to preventing cervical cancer based on findings showing successful reduction in the risk of cervical cancer after removal of a discrete population of cells in the cervix.

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Annals of Surgery
Test increases odds of correct surgery for thyroid cancer patients
The routine use of a molecular testing panel increases the likelihood of performing the correct initial surgery for thyroid cancer patients by 30 percent, the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, partner with University of Pittsburgh Medical Center CancerCenter, reports in the Annals of Surgery. The test is available at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center/University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute Multidisciplinary Thyroid Center and other diagnostic testing agencies.
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Astrobiology
Bacteria manipulate salt to build shelters to hibernate
Spanish researchers have detected an unknown interaction between microorganisms and salt. When Escherichia coli cells are introduced into a droplet of salt water and is left to dry, bacteria manipulate the sodium chloride crystallisation to create biomineralogical biosaline three dimensional morphologically complex formations, where they hibernate. Afterwards, simply by rehydrating the material, bacteria are revived. The discovery was made by chance with a home microscope, but it made the cover of the 'Astrobiology' journal and may help to find signs of life on other planets.

Contact: SINC
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Researchers uncover the secret lymphatic identity of the Schlemm's canal
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, two research groups reveal that Schlemm's canal -- a specialized structure in the eye responsible for fluid drainage-shares features of lymphatic vessels, which maintain interstitial fluid homeostasis.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Study shows epigenetic changes can drive cancer
Researchers at the United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service Children's Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital have now created a mouse model providing the first in vivo evidence that epigenetic alterations alone can cause cancer. Their report appears today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
Sidney Kimmel Foundation, US Department of Agriculture, March of Dimes, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Dipali Pathak
pathak@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Stem Cell Reports
NYSCF scientists one step closer to cell therapy for multiple sclerosis patients
For the first time, NYSCF scientists generated induced pluripotent stem cells lines from skin samples of patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis and further, they developed an accelerated protocol to induce these stem cells into becoming oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system implicated in multiple sclerosis and many other diseases.

Contact: David McKeon
dmckeon@nyscf.org
212-365-7440
New York Stem Cell Foundation

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
New study draws links between wildlife loss and social conflicts
Citing many sobering examples of how wildlife loss leads to conflict among people around the world, a new article co-authored by Wildlife Conservation Society Health & Ecosystems: Analysis of Linkages program director Dr. Christopher Golden, calls for an interdisciplinary approach to tackle global biodiversity decline.

Contact: Scott Smith
ssmith@wcs.org
718-220-3698
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
New imaging agent provides better picture of the gut
A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This safe, noninvasive method for assessing the function and properties of the GI tract in real time could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of gut diseases.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Korean Ministry of Science

Contact: Weibo Cai
wcai@uwhealth.org
608-262-1749
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
The microbes make the sake brewery
A sake brewery has its own microbial terroir, meaning the microbial populations found on surfaces in the facility resemble those found in the product, creating the final flavor according to research published ahead of print in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. This is the first time investigators have taken a microbial census of a sake brewery.

Contact: Jim Sliwa
jsliwa@asmusa.org
202-942-9297
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Biology Letters
Moose drool inhibits growth of toxic fungus: York U research
Research out of York University shows a surprisingly effective way to fight against a certain species of toxic grass fungus: moose saliva -- yes, moose saliva.

Contact: Robin Heron
rheron@yorku.ca
416-736-2100 x22097
York University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
Stanford biologist warns of early stages of Earth's 6th mass extinction event
Stanford biology professor Rodolfo Dirzo and his colleagues warn that this 'defaunation' could have harmful downstream effects on human health.

Contact: Bjorn Carey
bccarey@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS Pathogens
TGen-led study seeks to understand why some HIV-positive men are more infectious
A new study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute provides insights into the interplay among bacteria, viruses and the immune system during HIV infection.

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Chemist develops X-ray vision for quality assurance
A Technical University of Denmark researcher has developed a method that uses X-rays for the rapid identification of substances present in an indeterminate powder. The new technique has the capacity to recognize advanced biological molecules such as proteins. The method therefore has enormous potential in both food production and the pharmaceutical industry, where it opens up new opportunities for the quality assurance of protein-based medicines, for example.

Contact: Christian Grundahl Frankaer
cghar@kemi.dtu.dk
45-45-25-24-69
Technical University of Denmark

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
New methods of detecting Salmonella in pork meat processing
Infections caused by food-borne microorganisms are an increasing public health burden. In a Ph.D. project at the National Food Institute at the Technical University of Denmark, new methods of characterizing and detecting foodborne illness-causing Salmonella in pork meat processing and in bacteria in water, feed and food samples were studied.

Contact: Jeffrey Hoorfar
jhoo@food.dtu.dk
45-35-88-73-79
Technical University of Denmark

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Four-billion-year-old chemistry in cells today
Parts of the primordial soup in which life arose have been maintained in our cells today according to scientists at the University of East Anglia. Research published today in the Journal of Biological Chemistry reveals how cells in plants, yeast and very likely also in animals still perform ancient reactions thought to have been responsible for the origin of life -- some four billion years ago.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Noise pollution impacts fish species differently
Acoustic disturbance has different effects on different species of fish, according to a new study from the universities of Bristol and Exeter which tested fish anti-predator behavior.

Contact: Philippa Walker
press-office@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-7777
University of Bristol

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Western Indian Ocean communities play vital role in conservation
An international team of researchers led by the University of York has carried out the first assessment of community-led marine conservation in the Western Indian Ocean. The results, reported in the journal PLOS ONE, point to a revolution in the management of marine protected areas, with almost half of the sites -- more than 11,000 square km -- in the region now under local community stewardship.
Natural Environment Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-019-043-22153
University of York

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Genome Biology
Smartphone experiment tracks whether our life story is written in our gut bacteria
Life events such as visiting another country or contracting a disease cause a significant shift in the make-up of the gut microbiota -- the community of bacteria living in the digestive system, according to research published in the open-access journal Genome Biology. Two participants used smartphone apps to collect information every day for a year in the study by scientists from MIT and Harvard. The authors think the method could be rolled out to studies of human-bacteria relationships with many more participants.

Contact: Anna Perman
Anna.Perman@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22429
BioMed Central

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Leaf-mining insects destroyed with the dinosaurs, others quickly appeared
After the asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous period that triggered the dinosaurs' extinction and ushered in the Paleocene, leaf-mining insects in the western United States completely disappeared. Only a million years later, at Mexican Hat, in southeastern Montana, fossil leaves show diverse leaf-mining traces from new insects that were not present during the Cretaceous, according to paleontologists.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of American Society of Nephrology
Zerenex (ferric citrate) long-term Phase 3 study results published in JASN
Keryx Biopharmaceuticals Inc. announced the publication of results from the long-term, randomized, active control Phase 3 study of Zerenex (ferric citrate), the Company's investigational oral ferric iron-based phosphate binder, for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis. The PERFECTED study (PhosphatE binding and iRon delivery with FErric CiTrate in EsrD) was published online today in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Contact: Amy Sullivan
amy.sullivan@keryx.com
617-466-3447
Edelman

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS Pathogens
Fighting bacteria -- with viruses
Research published today in PLOS Pathogens reveals how viruses called bacteriophages destroy the bacterium Clostridium difficile, which is becoming a serious problem in hospitals and healthcare institutes, due to its resistance to antibiotics. The study, by scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, could help bring about a new way of fighting this and other bacteria.

Contact: Sonia Furtado Neves
sonia.furtado@embl.de
European Molecular Biology Laboratory