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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 27-Nov-2014
Cell Death & Disease
Stroke damage mechanism identified
Researchers have discovered a mechanism linked to the brain damage often suffered by stroke victims -- and are now searching for drugs to block it.
Royal Society, Alzheimer's Research UK, Natural Science Foundation of China, National Basic Research Program of China

Contact: Chris Bunting
c.j.bunting@leeds.ac.uk
44-011-334-32049
University of Leeds

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
TGen-Luxembourg scientific team conducts unprecedented analysis of microbial ecosystem
An international team of scientists from the Translational Genomics Research Institute and The Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine have completed a first-of-its-kind microbial analysis of a biological waste water treatment plant that has broad implications for protecting the environment, energy recovery and human health. The study, published Nov. 26 in the scientific journal Nature Communications, describes in unprecedented detail the complex relationships within a model ecosystem.

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Cell
How do our muscles work?
Scientists led by Kristina Djinovic-Carugo at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna have elucidated the molecular structure and regulation of the essential muscle protein alpha-actinin. The new findings allow unprecedented insights into the protein's mode of action and its role in muscle disorders. The findings, made in collaboration with King's College London, may lead to improved treatments, and are published in the top-class journal Cell.

Contact: Kristina Djinovic-Carugo
kristina.djinovic@univie.ac.at
0043-142-775-2203
University of Vienna

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
The Electricity Journal
Matched 'hybrid' systems may hold key to wider use of renewable energy
The use of renewable energy in the United States could take a significant leap forward with improved storage technologies or more efforts to 'match' different forms of alternative energy systems that provide an overall more steady flow of electricity, researchers say in a new report.

Contact: Joshua Merritt
merrittj@oregonstate.edu
Oregon State University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Copper on the brain at rest
A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers has shown that proper copper levels are essential to the health of the brain at rest.
National Institutes of Health and Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
ZooKeys
The influence of the Isthmus of Panama in the evolution of freshwater shrimps in America
The molecular evolution of freshwater shrimps in America was studied based in the relationship between Pacific and Atlantic sister species that are separated by the Isthmus of Panama. Despite the high morphological similarities between each pair of species, it was concluded that all species are valid taxonomic entities, proving the efficiency of the Isthmus for the genetic isolation of the species. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Fernando L. Mantelatto
flmantel@usp.br
55-163-602-3656
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Advances in Space Research
Process converts human waste into rocket fuel
Buck Rogers surely couldn't have seen this one coming, but at NASA's request, University of Florida researchers have figured out how to turn human waste -- yes, that kind -- into rocket fuel.

Contact: Pratap Pullammanappallil
pcpratap@ufl.edu
352-392-1864 x203
University of Florida

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
ZooKeys
Amazonian shrimps: An underwater world still unknown
A study reveals how little we know about the Amazonian diversity. Aiming to resolve a scientific debate about the validity of two species of freshwater shrimp described in the first half of the last century, researchers have found that not only this species is valid, but also discovered the existence of a third unknown species. The researchers concluded that these species evolved about 10 million years ago. The study was published in the journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Dr. Fernando Mantelatto
flmantel@usp.br
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Frontiers in Marine Science
Toolkit for ocean health
One of the global leaders in ocean science, Professor Carlos Duarte has shared his insights on the future of the world's oceans in a paper published in the international open-access journal Frontiers in Marine Science.

Contact: David Stacey
david.stacey@uwa.edu.au
61-864-883-229
Frontiers

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Protecting the rainforest through agriculture and forestry
Conservationists are always looking for ways to halt the pace of deforestation in tropical rainforests. One approach involves recultivating abandoned agricultural land. An international team investigating this concept has just published its findings in Nature Communications. Working in the mountainous regions of Ecuador, the researchers found afforestation and intense pasturing to be particularly effective, clearly increasing the environmental and economic value of abandoned farmlands.
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Barbara Wankerl
barbara.wankerl@tum.de
49-892-892-2562
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
5th International GOCE User Workshop
Geophysical Research Letters
First harvest of research based on the final GOCE gravity model
Just four months after the final data package from ESA's GOCE satellite mission was delivered, researchers are laying out a rich harvest of scientific results at the 5th International GOCE User Workshop in Paris. The GOCE Gravity Consortium, coordinated by the Technische Universität München, produced all of the mission's data products. On this basis, studies in geophysics, geology, ocean circulation, climate change, and civil engineering are sharpening the picture of our dynamic planet.
European Space Agency

Contact: Patrick Regan
patrick.regan@tum.de
49-162-427-9876
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Unmanned Systems
An eel-lectrifying future for autonomous underwater robots
A team in Singapore has developed and built a prototype for an eel-like robotic fish to be operable remotely, small, sophisticated and intelligent enough to operate autonomously underwater. A new form of central pattern generator model is presented, by which the swimming pattern of a real Anguilliform fish is successfully applied to the robotic prototype. Mathematical model, control law design, different locomotion patterns, and locomotion planning are presented for an Anguilliform robotic fish.

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com.sg
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Scientific Data
New guide to the genetic jungle of muscles can help health research
Researchers from Aarhus University and Bispebjerg Hospital have created a comprehensive overview of how tens of thousands of genes interact in relation to the behavior of muscles. At the same time, they have developed a guide to the enormous amounts of data and thus paved the way for new knowledge about diseases associated with lack of activity.

Contact: Kristian Vissing
vissing@ph.au.dk
45-87-16-81-73
Aarhus University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Classical enzymatic theory revised by including water motions
The main focus of enzymology lies on enzymes themselves, whereas the role of water motions in mediating the biological reaction is often left aside owing to the complex molecular behavior. The groups of Martina Havenith and Irit Sagi revised the classical enzymatic steady state theory by including long-lasting protein-water coupled motions into models of functional catalysis.
German Research Foundation

Contact: Martina Havenith-Newen
Martina.Havenith@rub.de
49-234-322-4249
Ruhr-University Bochum

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Physical Review Letters
The mysterious 'action at a distance' between liquid containers
For several years, it has been known that superfluid helium housed in reservoirs located next to each other acts collectively, even when the channels connecting the reservoirs are too narrow and too long to allow for substantial flow. A new theoretical model reveals that the phenomenon of mysterious communication 'at a distance' between fluid reservoirs is much more common than previously thought.

Contact: Anna Maciołek
maciolek@is.mpg.de
49-711-689-1903
Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Hydrothermal settlers
OIST researcher Yuichi Nakajima decodes barnacle genetics to understand how climate change impacts the deep ocean.

Contact: Kaoru Natori
kaoru.natori@oist.jp
81-989-662-389
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Human antibodies produced in DNA-vaccinated cows protect in lethal models of hantavirus
Scientists investigating the potentially deadly hantavirus have used a novel approach to developing protective antibodies against it. The research, published in Science Translational Medicine, used specially bred 'transchromosomal' cows engineered to produce fully human antibodies. Investigators immunized the cows with DNA vaccines targeting two types of hantaviruses, Andes and Sin Nombre. The team collected plasma from the cows, purified the human IgG antibodies, and tested the material, which had potent neutralizing activity against both hantaviruses.
Military Infectious Diseases Research Program

Contact: Caree Vander Linden
teresa.l.vanderlinden.civ@mail.mil
301-619-2285
US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Interface
Prehistoric conflict hastened human brain's capacity for collaboration, study says
Warfare not only hastened human technological progress and vast social and political changes, but may have greatly contributed to the evolutionary emergence of humans' high intelligence and ability to work together toward common goals, according to a new study from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis.
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis

Contact: Catherine Crawley
ccrawley@nimbios.org
865-974-9350
National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS)

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
DNA survives critical entry into Earth's atmosphere
The genetic material DNA can survive a flight through space and re-entry into the earth's atmosphere -- and still pass on genetic information. A team of scientists from UZH obtained these astonishing results during an experiment on the TEXUS-49 research rocket mission.

Contact: Dr. Oliver Ullrich
oliver.ullrich@uzh.ch
41-446-354-060
University of Zurich

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Precise measurements of microbial ecosystems
The Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine has succeeded for the first time in describing the complex relationships within an ecosystem in unprecedented detail. For their work, carried out in collaboration with US and Luxembourg partners, their model ecosystem was a 'biological wastewater treatment plant.' In it live numerous species of bacteria which are involved in the wastewater purification process. The researchers publish their results today in the journal Nature Communications.
Luxembourg National Research Fund, Integrated Biobank of Luxembourg, Luxembourg Ministry of Higher Education and Research

Contact: Britta Schlüter
britta.schlueter@uni.lu
352-466-644-6563
University of Luxembourg

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
The unbelievable underworld and its impact on us all
A new study has pulled together research into the most diverse place on earth to demonstrate how the organisms below-ground could hold the key to understanding how the worlds ecosystems function and how they are responding to climate change.

Contact: Jamie Brown
jamie.brown@manchester.ac.uk
01-612-758-383
University of Manchester

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
BMC Medicine
Study reveals significantly increased risk of stillbirth in males
A large-scale study led by the University of Exeter has found that boys are more likely to be stillborn than girls. Published in the journal BMC Medicine, the study reviewed more than 30 million births globally, and found that the risk of stillbirth is about ten percent higher in boys. This equates to a loss of around 100,000 additional male babies per year.
Wellcome Trust

Contact: Jo Bowler
pressoffice@exeter.ac.uk
44-013-927-22062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology
The artificial pancreas shown to improve the treatment of type 1 diabetes
The world's first clinical trial comparing three alternative treatments for type 1 diabetes was conducted in Montreal by researchers at the institut de recherches cliniques de Montreal and the University of Montreal. The study confirms that the external artificial pancreas improves glucose control and reduces the risk of hypoglycemia compared to conventional diabetes treatment.
Canadian Diabetes Foundation

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
56th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
New England Journal of Medicine
Two studies identify a detectable, pre-cancerous state in the blood
Researchers from the Broad Institute, Harvard Medical School, and Harvard-affiliated hospitals have uncovered an easily detectable, 'pre-malignant' state in the blood that significantly increases the likelihood that an individual will go on to develop blood cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma, or myelodysplastic syndrome. The discovery, which was made independently by two research teams affiliated with the Broad and partner institutions, opens new avenues for research aimed at early detection and prevention of blood cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Gabrielle's Angel Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Wellcome Trust, and others

Contact: Veronica Meade-Kelly
veronica@broadinstitute.org
617-714-7113
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Cancer Cell
Research on a rare cancer exposes possible route to new treatments
Researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah discovered the unusual role of lactate in the metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma and also confirmed that a fusion gene is the cancer-causing agent in this disease.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Linda Aagard
801-587-7639
University of Utah Health Sciences