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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Making lab-grown tissues stronger
Lab-grown tissues could one day provide new treatments for injuries and damage to the joints, including articular cartilage, tendons and ligaments.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
University of Tennessee study finds saving lonely species is important for the environment
Joe Bailey looked at endemic eucalyptus found in Tasmania. They discovered that these rare species have developed unique characteristics to survive, and that these characteristics may also impact the survival of its neighbors in the ecosystem.

Contact: Whitney Heins
wheins@utk.edu
865-974-5460
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
New Space
Is space tourism safe or do civilians risk health effects?
Several companies are developing spacecraft designed to take ordinary citizens, not astronauts, on short trips into space. 'Space tourism' and short periods of weightlessness appear to be safe for most individuals according to a series of articles on space biomedicine published in New Space.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Global Change Biology
Dartmouth study finds restoring wetlands can lessen soil sinkage, greenhouse gas emissions
Restoring wetlands can help reduce or reverse soil subsidence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to research in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta by Dartmouth College researchers and their colleagues.

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
The Gerontological Society of America's 67th Annual Scientific Meeting
Einstein-Montefiore investigators present aging research at Gerontological Society of America's Annual Scientific Meeting
Investigators at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center will present their latest aging research at the Gerontological Society of America's 67th Annual Scientific Meeting. Topics include the identification of a genotype that can predict survival, risk factors for cognitive impairment and the cellular biology of aging. GSA 2014 will take place Nov. 5-9, 2014 in Washington, DC.

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Intelligence
Can parents make their kids smarter?
Florida State University criminology professor Kevin Beaver examined a nationally representative sample of youth alongside a sample of adopted children from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and found evidence to support the argument that IQ is not the result of parental socialization.

Contact: Amy Farnum-Patronis
afarnumpatronis@fsu.edu
850-645-1294
Florida State University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Ecology
Female frogs modify offspring development depending on reproduction date
Global warming is altering the reproduction of plants and animals, notably accelerating the date when reproduction and other life processes occur. A study by the University of Uppsala, including the participation of Spanish researcher Germán Orizaola, has discovered that some amphibians are capable of making their offspring grow at a faster rate if they have been born later due to the climate.

Contact: SINC
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Clinical practice guidelines address multimodality treatment for esophageal cancer
The Society of Thoracic Surgeons has released new clinical practice guidelines for treating cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction, area where the esophagus meets the stomach.

Contact: Cassie McNulty
mcnulty@sts.org
312-202-5865
Elsevier

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Breakdown in gut barriers to bacteria may promote inflammation and craving in alcoholics
Bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract fulfill many vital functions and are critical for digestion. Yet, these same bacteria can induce strong inflammatory responses by the immune system if they penetrate the gut and enter the bloodstream.

Contact: Rhiannon Bugno
Biol.Psych@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-0880
Elsevier

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Nucleic Acid Therapeutics
New guidelines for reproductive & developmental toxicity testing of oligonucleotide drugs
Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics present unique challenges when it comes to testing their potential to cause reproductive and developmental harm. New consensus guidelines for toxicity testing that take into consideration the combined chemical and biological characteristics of these novel biopharmaceuticals are presented in Nucleic Acid Therapeutics.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
PLOS Pathogens
Researchers find bat influenza viruses unlikely threaten human health
Kansas State University veterinary researchers collaborated on a study that shows the bat influence virus poses a low risk to humans.

Contact: Wenjun Ma
wma@vet.k-state.edu
785-532-4337
Kansas State University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Together we are strong -- or insufferable
Everyone can have an impact on the dynamics of a group, particularly if they join forces with others.

Contact: Dr. Kerstin Mehnert
mehnert@evolbio.mpg.de
49-452-276-3233
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
PLOS Genetics
Identifying the source of stem cells
When most animals begin life, cells immediately begin accepting assignments to become a head, tail or a vital organ. However, mammals, including humans, are special. The cells of mammalian embryos get to make a different first choice -- to become the protective placenta or to commit to forming the baby.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
ZooKeys
Four new dragon millipedes found in China
A team of scientists has described four new species of dragon millipedes from China, two of which are cave dwellers. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: Liu Weixin
da2000wei@163.com
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
FASEB Journal
Clock gene dysregulation may explain overactive bladder
If you think sleep problems and bladder problems are a fact of life in old age, you may be right. A new report appearing in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, shows that our sleep-wake cycles are genetically connected to our bladder, and disruptions to one may cause problems with the other.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
FASEB Journal
New molecule sneaks medicines across the blood/brain barrier
Delivering life-saving drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) might become a little easier thanks to a new report published in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal. In the report, scientists describe an antibody, called 'FC5,' is one-tenth the size of a traditional antibody and able to cross the BBB.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
FASEB Journal
Size matters: Baby's size at birth may predict risk for disease later in life
A new research report published in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal suggests that being overweight might be better in the long term than being underweight.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
FASEB Journal
BPA exposure by infants may increase later risk of food intolerance
A new research published in November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, scientists show, for the first time, that there is a link between perinatal exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) at low doses and the risk to develop food intolerance in later life.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
FASEB Journal
Peripheral clocks don't need the brain's master clock to function correctly
New research published in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal further adds to our understanding of the circadian rhythm by suggesting that the suprachiasmaticus nucleus clock, a tiny region of the hypothalamus considered to be the body's 'master' timekeeper, is not necessary to align body rhythms with the light-dark cycle.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Scientific Reports
Reef-builders with a sense of harmony
Cold-water corals of the species Lophelia pertusa are able to fuse skeletons of genetically distinct individuals. On dives with JAGO, a research submersible stationed at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, scientists from Scotland and Germany made the first-ever discovery of branches of different colors that had flawlessly merged. The ability to fuse supports the reef stability and thus contributes to the success of corals as reef-builders of the deep sea.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Stem Cell Reports
Reconstruction of a patterned piece of spinal cord in 3-D culture
The central nervous system in vertebrates develops from the neural tube, which is the basis for the differentiation in spinal cord and brain.

Contact: Birte Urban-Eicheler
birte.urban@crt-dresden.de
49-035-145-882-065
Technische Universität Dresden

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
European Physical Journal E
Ion adsorption matter in biology
Biological membranes are mainly composed of lipid bilayers. Gaining a better understanding of adsorption of solution ions onto lipid membranes helps clarify functional processes in biological cells. A new study, published in EPJ E, provides a quantitative description of the equilibria between lipid membranes and surrounding solution ions. In addition to shedding some light on biological processes, these results could also have implications for, among other things, the future development of medical diagnostics.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
IEEE Intelligent Systems
New tech aims to improve communication between dogs and humans
Researchers have developed a suite of technologies that can be used to enhance communication between dogs and humans, which has applications in everything from search and rescue to service dogs to training our pets.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Nucleic Acids Research
The geometry of RNA
To understand the function of an RNA molecule we need to know its three-dimensional structure. Unfortunately, establishing the shape of an RNA strand is anything but easy and often requires a combination of experimental techniques and computer-based simulations. Many computing methods are used but these are often complex and slow. A team of scientists from SISSA – the International School for Advanced Studies of Trieste – has devised a simple and versatile method, based on the geometry of the RNA molecule.

Contact: Federica Sgorbissa
pressoffice@sissa.it
39-040-378-7644
International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA)

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Seeing dinosaur feathers in a new light
Why were dinosaurs covered in a cloak of feathers long before the early bird species Archaeopteryx first attempted flight? Researchers from the University of Bonn and the University of Göttingen attempt to answer precisely that question in the latest issue of the renowned journal 'Science.' The evolution of feathers made dinosaurs more colorful, which in turn had a profoundly positive impact on communication, the selection of mates and on dinosaurs' procreation.

Contact: Marie-Claire Koschowitz
m.koschowitz@uni-bonn.de
49-022-873-1786
University of Bonn