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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
World Water Week
The key to drilling wells with staying power in the developing world
A UNC study found that if local water communities collect fees for repairs and train community members to fix the wells, they can remain in use for decades.
Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

Contact: Johnny Cruz
jcruz@worldvision.org
253-815-2072
World Vision

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Quality of US diet shows modest improvement, but overall remains poor
Dietary quality in the US has improved steadily in recent years -- spurred in large part by reduced trans fat intake -- but overall dietary quality remains poor and disparities continue to widen among socioeconomic and racial/ethnic groups, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health.

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science
China's reform of R&D budget management doesn't go far enough
China's budget management is lagging behind countries which spend similar amounts on research and development, and recent reform has not gone far enough. That is the view of the University of Nottingham's Dr. Cong Cao, whose research is published on Aug. 29, 2014, in the prestigious academic journal, Science.
European Union's 7th Framework Program

Contact: Dr. Cong Cao
cong.cao@nottingham.ac.uk
44-115-846-7972
University of Nottingham

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Cellphone addiction 'an increasingly realistic possibility,' Baylor study finds
Women college students average 10 hours a day on their cellphones and men students spend nearly eight. Excessive use poses potential risks for academic performance, according to a Baylor University study on cellphone activity.

Contact: Terry Goodrich
terry_goodrich@baylor.edu
254-710-3321
Baylor University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
A VA exit strategy
As the federal government plans its exit strategy from the war, now may be the time for it to rethink its role in providing health care to veterans, says a Perspective piece in the New England Journal of Medicine. The VA incurs high fixed costs of a brick-and-mortar health care system, the largest salaried workforce in the federal government, and a large administration.

Contact: Annmarie Christensen
Annmarie.Christensen@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-0897
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
After Great Recession, Americans are unhappy, worried, pessimistic, Rutgers study finds
The protracted and uneven recovery from the Great Recession has led most Americans to conclude that the US economy has undergone a permanent change for the worse, according to a new national study at Rutgers. Seven in 10 now say the recession's impact is permanent, up from half in 2009 when the recession officially ended, according to the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development.

Contact: Steve Manas
smanas@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0559
Rutgers University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Environmental Sciences, Processes and Impacts
Second-hand e-cig smoke compared to regular cigarette smoke
Second-hand e-cig smoke has 10 times less particulate matter than regular cigarette smoke; but higher levels of certain toxic metals.
Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
ReCALL
Computer games give a boost to English
If you want to make a mark in the world of computer games you had better have a good English vocabulary. It has now also been scientifically proven that someone who is good at computer games has a larger English vocabulary. This is revealed by a study at the University of Gothenburg and Karlstad University, Sweden.

Contact: Torsten Arpi
torsten.arpi@ped.gu.se
46-031-786-2161
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Dental Hygiene
UTHealth researchers find up to 3,000 times the bacterial growth on hollow-head toothbrushes
Solid-head power toothbrushes retain less bacteria compared to hollow-head toothbrushes, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Dentistry.
Advanced Response Corporation

Contact: Edgar Veliz
Edgar.R.Veliz@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3307
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Canadians rank highly when it comes to public science knowledge, attitudes, and engagement
A new expert panel report, Science Culture: Where Canada Stands, released today by the Council of Canadian Academies, helps to paint the clearest picture of Canada's science culture and science culture support system in 25 years. The expert panel who conducted the assessment found Canadians excel in public science knowledge, attitudes, and engagement; however they also determined there is room for improvement in some areas, including skills development.

Contact: Cathleen Meechan
cathleen.meechan@scienceadvice.ca
613-567-5000 x228
Council of Canadian Academies

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Dyslexic readers have disrupted network connections in the brain
Dyslexia, the most commonly diagnosed learning disability in the United States, is a neurological reading disability that occurs when the regions of the brain that process written language don't function normally.

Contact: Rhiannon Bugno
Biol.Psych@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-0880
Elsevier

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
BMJ Open
Plain cigarette packs don't hurt small retailers or boost trade in illicit tobacco
Plain packs for tobacco products don't hurt small retailers, flood the market with very cheap cigarettes, or boost the trade in illicit tobacco, finds research on the early experience of the policy in Australia, and published in the online journal BMJ Open.
Quit Victoria, VicHealth, Department of Health for the Victorian Smoking and Health annual survey

Contact: Caroline White
cwhite@bmj.com
44-079-808-00465
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Menopause
The high cost of hot flashes: Millions in lost wages preventable
The steep decline in the use of hormone therapy has spawned a prevalent but preventable side effect: millions of women suffering in silence with hot flashes, according to a study by a Yale School of Medicine researcher and colleagues.
Noven Pharmaceuticals

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Journal of Divorce & Remarriage
No cookie-cutter divorces, so what info should online co-parenting classes offer?
Required online classes for divorcing couples who have children are good at teaching parents how to deal with children's needs and responses to their family's new situation. But co-parenting couples would benefit from content that helps adults cope with their own emotions and from unique tracks for families with special circumstances such as intimate partner violence or alcoholism, said a University of Illinois researcher in human and community development.

Contact: Phyllis Picklesimer
p-pickle@illinois.edu
217-244-2827
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
ACM SIGMIS Computers and People Research Conference
Research geared to keep women from fleeing IT profession
Employers have been trying for years to reverse the exodus of women from IT positions. They're failing. New research from Baylor University shows they've been focusing on the wrong areas.

Contact: Eric Eckert
Eric_M_Eckert@baylor.edu
254-710-1964
Baylor University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
American Sociological Review
IU study: Social class makes a difference in how children tackle classroom problems
An Indiana University study has found that social class can account for differences in how parents coach their children to manage classroom challenges. Such differences can affect a child's education by reproducing inequalities in the classroom.

Contact: Jessica McCrory Calarco
jcalarco@indiana.edu
Indiana University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
RSC Advances
Rubber meets the road with new ORNL carbon, battery technologies
Recycled tires could see new life in lithium-ion batteries.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
American Journal of Managed Care
Tracking spending among the commercially insured
Recent growth in health care spending for commercially insured individuals is due primarily to increases in prices for medical services, rather than increased use, according to a new study led by researchers at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice, published in the American Journal of Managed Care.
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Contact: Annmarie Christensen
Annmarie.Christensen@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-0897
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
New Media and Society
MU researchers develop more accurate Twitter analysis tools
'Trending' topics on Twitter show the quantity of tweets associated with a specific event but trends only show the highest volume keywords and hashtags, and may not give information about the tweets themselves. Now, using data associated with the Super Bowl and World Series, researchers at the University of Missouri have developed and validated a software program that analyzes event-based tweets and measures the context of tweets rather than just the quantity.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Psychological Science
Group identity emphasized more by those who just make the cut
People and institutions who are marginal members of a high-status or well-esteemed group tend to emphasize their group membership more than those who are squarely entrenched members of the group, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Fact or fiction: Which do moviegoers prefer?
Do you feel sadder watching a documentary about war or a drama about a young person dying of cancer? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers mistakenly believe they will have stronger emotional reactions when stories are based on true events rather than fiction.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Environmental Science and Technology
Trash burning worldwide significantly worsens air pollution
Unregulated trash burning around the globe is pumping far more pollution into the atmosphere than shown by official records. A new study led by NCAR estimates that more than 40 percent of the world's garbage is burned in such fires, with emissions that can substantially affect human health and climate.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Hosansky
hosansky@ucar.edu
303-497-8611
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Getting things done: How does changing the way you think about deadlines help you reach your goals?
From doing yard work to finishing up the last few classes required for a college degree, consumers struggle to get things done. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, the way consumers think about deadlines can determine whether or not they start tasks and accomplish their goals.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
An inconvenient truth: Does responsible consumption benefit corporations more than society?
Are environmental and social problems such as global warming and poverty the result of inadequate governmental regulations or does the burden fall on our failure as consumers to make better consumption choices? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, responsible consumption shifts the burden for solving global problems from governments to consumers and ultimately benefits corporations more than society.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Outsourcing parenthood? It takes a village AND the marketplace to raise a child
Ask any parent raising kids in today's fast-paced society and chances are they would agree that there are only so many hours in the day. Recognizing a need for help, many businesses now offer traditional caregiving services ranging from planning birthday parties to teaching children how to ride a bike. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, by outsourcing traditional parental duties, modern-day parents feel they are ultimately protecting parenthood.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals