B2B Directory

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
22-Oct-2014 23:10
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

News By Subject

Business & Economics


Search this subject:

 
Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Baker Institute paper: Data indicate there is no immigration crisis
Is there an 'immigration crisis' on the US-Mexico border? Not according to an examination of historical immigration data, according to a new paper from Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Social Science Research
The unexpected benefits of adjustable rate mortgages
As would be expected during a time of consumer deleveraging, households applied more than 70 percent of their mortgage savings to reducing outstanding credit card debts. Not only did the lower payments reduce mortgage defaults but credit card delinquencies fell. 'These choices had significant impact on foreclosures, house prices and employment in regions that were more exposed to interest rate declines,' the researchers concluded.

Contact: Susan Guibert
susan.guibert@chicagobooth.edu
773-702-9232
University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Child Development
Early intervention could boost education levels
Taking steps from an early age to improve childhood education skills could raise overall population levels of academic achievement by as much as 5 percent, and reduce socioeconomic inequality in education by 15 percent, according to international research led by the University of Adelaide.
National Health and Medical Research Council

Contact: Catherine Chittleborough
catherine.chittleborough@adelaide.edu.au
61-883-131-684
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
BMC Infectious Diseases
Lessons from the 'Spanish flu,' nearly 100 years later
Just in time for flu season, a new Michigan State University study of 'the mother of all pandemics' could offer insight into infection control measures for the flu and other epidemic diseases.

Contact: Kristen Parker
kristen.parker@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8942
Michigan State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
American Journal of Sports Medicine
Harvard study offers first-ever look at how NCAA concussion guidelines are followed
Though most NCAA colleges and universities have created programs to help athletes deal with concussions, a new Harvard study has found that, when it comes to specific components of those plans, many institutions still lag behind accepted standards.

Contact: Peter Reuell
preuell@fas.harvard.edu
617-496-8070
Harvard University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Highly effective new anti-cancer drug shows few side effects in mice
A new drug, known as OTS964, can eradicate aggressive human lung cancers transplanted into mice. It inhibits the action of a protein that is overproduced by several tumor types but is rarely expressed in healthy adult tissues. Without this protein, cancer cells fail to complete the cell-division process and die.
New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan, OncoTherapy Science Inc.

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
100 days in Michigan: U-M team releases new analysis of state's Medicaid expansion
Right out of the starting gate, Michigan's expansion of health coverage for the poor and near-poor holds lessons for other states that are still on the fence about expanding their own Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act, a new analysis shows.

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Technovation
UMD researchers formulate cyber protection for supply chains
The supply chain is ground zero for several recent cyber breaches. Hackers, for example, prey on vendors that have remote access to a larger company's global information technology systems, software and networks. A counter-measure, via a user-ready online portal, has been developed by researchers in the Supply Chain Management Center at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business.
National Institute of Standards and Technology

Contact: Greg Muraski
gmuraski@rhsmith.umd.edu
301-405-5283
University of Maryland

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Perceived hatred fuels conflicts between Democrats and Republicans, Israelis and Palestinians
A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academic of Sciences by a team of researchers from The New School for Social Research, Northwestern University and Boston College demonstrates how seemingly unsolvable political and ethnic conflicts are fueled by asymmetrical perceptions of opponents' motivations -- and that these tensions can be relieved by providing financial incentives to better understand what drives an adversary group.
Northwestern University, Boston College, Dispute Resolution Research Center at Kellogg School of Management, National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Sam Biederman
sam.biederman@newschool.edu
212-229-5667 x3094
The New School

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
The Accounting Review
Less-numerate investors swayed by corporate report presentation effects
Less-numerate investors are more susceptible to style and presentation effects in corporate social responsibility reports, according to research from W. Brooke Elliott, the Roedgers Fellow in Accountancy and Professor Ken Perry Faculty Fellow at the College of Business.

Contact: Phil Ciciora
pciciora@illinois.edu
217-333-2177
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NOAA team discovers 2 vessels from WWII convoy battle off North Carolina
A team of researchers led by NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered two significant vessels from World War II's Battle of the Atlantic. The German U-boat 576 and the freighter Bluefields were found approximately 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina. Lost for more than 70 years, the discovery of the two vessels, in an area known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic, is a rare window into a historic military battle and the underwater battlefield landscape of WWII.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, UNC-Coastal Studies Institute, National Park Service

Contact: Lauren Heesemann
lauren.heesemann@noaa.gov
252-475-5495
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Study shows how texas campus police tackle stalking
One out of every five female students experience stalking victimization during their college career, but many of those cases are not reported to police, according to a study by the Crime Victims' Institute at Sam Houston State University.
Crime Victims' Institute

Contact: Beth Kuhles
kuhles@shsu.edu
936-294-4425
Sam Houston State University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Vaccine
Flu vaccine may hold key to preventing heart disease
Flu vaccines are known to have a protective effect against heart disease, reducing the risk of a heart attack. For the first time, this research, published in Vaccine, reveals the molecular mechanism that underpins this phenomenon. The scientists behind the study say it could be harnessed to prevent heart disease directly.

Contact: Sacha Boucherie
s.boucherie@elsevier.com
31-204-853-564
Elsevier

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
CHEST 2014
Chest
Two Michigan high school students develop screening tools to detect lung and heart disease
Two Michigan high school students, sisters Ilina and Medha Krishen, have developed screening tools using electronic stethoscopes to detect lung and heart disease. The sisters will present their findings at CHEST 2014 in Austin, Texas next week.

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
The Physics Teacher
Backpack physics: Smaller hikers carry heavier loads
Hikers are generally advised that the weight of the packs they carry should correspond to their own size, with smaller individuals carrying lighter loads. Although petite backpackers might appreciate the excuse to hand off heavier gear to the larger members of the group, it turns out that they may not need the help.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
11 million will lose health insurance if ACA subsidies are eliminated, study finds
Several lawsuits have challenged the legality of the subsidies that help low- and moderate-income people buy private healtah insurance through marketplaces set up under the federal Affordable Care Act. A new study finds that eliminating those subsidies would sharply boost costs for consumers and cause more than 11 million Americans to lose their health insurance.
US Department of Health and Human Services

Contact: Warren Robak
robak@rand.org
310-451-6913
RAND Corporation

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
JAMA
Hospitals converting to for-profit status show better financial health, no loss in quality
Switching from nonprofit to for-profit status appears to boost hospitals' financial health but does not appear to lower the quality of care they provide or reduce the proportion of poor or minority patients receiving care.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Todd Datz
tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8413
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Bar attendance supports heavy drinking by young adults in the US-Mexico border region
Mexico is a nearby destination where younger US residents can legally drink heavily. However, high levels of drinking on the US side are not always linked to recent travel to Mexico. New findings show that higher levels of drinking among US-Mexico border youth are closely linked to their patterns of bar attendance, but not to how they think about drinking.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Britain A. Mills
britain.mills@utsouthwestern.edu
817-677-8557
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests
A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before may boost later learning.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Defense

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
International Studies Quarterly
Why sign rights treaties?
Since World War II, more than 45 international human-rights treaties have been signed by many of the world's roughly 200 countries. But why do some states sign such accords, especially if they lack a strong human-rights commitment in the first place?

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Fairness is in the brain
Ever wondered how people figure out what is fair? Look to the brain for the answer. According to a new Norwegian brain study, people appreciate fairness in much the same way as they appreciate money for themselves, and also that fairness is not necessarily that everybody gets the same income.

Contact: Alexander Cappelen
Alexander.Cappelen@nhh.no
47-936-30179
The University of Bergen

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
When to count the damage?
An international team of academics and activists collaborated to find out what works where, based on the wide variety of experiences with economic valuation in the EJOLT project.

Contact: Maria Jesus Delgado
MariaJesus.Delgado@uab.cat
34-935-814-049
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
Researchers confirm the biochemical cause of seasonal depression
New research confirms why some people suffer from the winter blues while others get through the winter without any problems.

Contact: Press Officer
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
Study shows no relationship between moderate adolescent cannabis use and exam results, IQ
A large UK study has found that occasional adolescent cannabis use does not lead to poorer educational and intellectual performance, but that heavy cannabis use is associated with slightly poorer exam results at age 16. The results come from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children a long-term study that follows the health of children born in the Bristol area in 1991 and 1992
UK Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, University of Bristol

Contact: Press Officer
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management
Head Start program benefits parents
Head Start programs may help low-income parents improve their educational status, according to a new study by Northwestern University researchers. The study is one of the first to examine whether a child's participation in the federal program benefits mothers and fathers -- in particular parents' educational attainment and employment.

Contact: Julie Deardorff
julie.deardorff@northwestern.edu
847-491-4890
Northwestern University