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Business/Economics
Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Study recalculates costs of combination vaccines
One of the most popular vaccine brands for children may not be the most cost-effective choice. And doctors may be overlooking some cost factors when choosing vaccines, driving the market toward what is actually a more expensive option, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Viruses
Re-emergence of Ebola focuses need for global surveillance strategies
EcoHealth Alliance, a nonprofit organization that focuses on conservation and global public health issues, published a comprehensive review today examining the current state of knowledge of the deadly Ebola and Marburg virus.

Contact: Anthony M. Ramos
ramos@ecohealthalliance.org
212-380-4469
EcoHealth Alliance

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Nature
Surprising material could play role in saving energy
One strategy for addressing the world's energy crisis is to stop wasting so much energy when producing and using it, such as in coal-fired power plants or transportation. Nearly two-thirds of energy input is lost as waste heat. Now Northwestern University scientists have discovered a surprising material that is the best in the world at converting waste heat to useful electricity. This outstanding property could be exploited in solid-state thermoelectric devices, with potentially enormous energy savings.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Psychological Science in the Public Interest
Classifying cognitive styles across disciplines
Various fields have developed diverse approaches to understanding the way people process information. A new report from psychological scientists aims to integrate these approaches by offering a new, integrated framework of cognitive styles that bridges different terminologies, concepts, and approaches.

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics
Wireless power transfer achieved at 5-meter distance
Chun T. Rim, a professor of Nuclear & Quantum Engineering at KAIST, and his team showcased, on April 16, 2014 at the KAIST campus, Daejeon, Republic of Korea, a great improvement in the distance that electric power can travel wirelessly. They developed the 'Dipole Coil Resonant System' for an extended range of inductive power transfer, up to 5 meters between transmitter and receiver coils.

Contact: Lan Yoon
hlyoon@kaist.ac.kr
82-423-502-294
The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Globalization and Health
New evidence of suicide epidemic among India's 'marginalized' farmers
Latest statistical research finds strong causal links between areas with the most suicides and areas where impoverished farmers are trying to grow crops that suffer from wild price fluctuations due to India's relatively recent shift to free market economics.

Contact: Jonathan Kennedy
jk428@cam.ac.uk
44-793-841-4350
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
International Journal of Electronic Marketing and Retailing
Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for
A statistical analysis of the gift 'fulfillments' at several hundred online wedding gift registries suggests that wedding guests are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to buying an appropriate gift for the happy couple.

Contact: Albert Ang
press@inderscience.com
Inderscience Publishers

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
Impact of childhood bullying still evident after 40 years
The negative social, physical and mental health effects of childhood bullying are still evident nearly 40 years later, according to new research by King's College London. The study is the first to look at the effects of bullying beyond early adulthood, and is published in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Contact: Seil Collins
seil.collins@kcl.ac.uk
44-207-848-5377
King's College London

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Medical Oncology
Radiation therapy for cervical cancer increases risk for colorectal cancer
Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston are the first to recommend that young women treated with radiation for cervical cancer should begin colorectal cancer screening earlier than traditionally recommended. The UTMB researchers, finding a high incidence of secondary colorectal cancers among cervical cancer survivors treated with radiation, offer new recommendations that the younger women in this group begin colorectal cancer screening about eight years after their initial cervical cancer diagnosis.
Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas

Contact: Molly Dannenmaier
mjdannen@utmb.edu
409-772-8790
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Developmental Science
IU cognitive scientists use 'I spy' to show spoken language helps direct children's eyes
In a new study, Indiana U. cognitive scientists demonstrate that children spot objects more quickly when prompted by words than if they are only prompted by images. Spoken language taps into children's cognitive system, enhancing their ability to learn and to navigate cluttered environments. As such the study opens up new avenues for research into the way language might shape the course of developmental disabilities such as ADHD, difficulties with school, and other attention-related problems.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Development

Contact: Liz Rosdeitcher
rosdeitc@indiana.edu
812-855-4507
Indiana University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Review of Finance
Rice U. study: Performance measures for CEOs vary greatly
As companies file their annual proxy statements with the US Securities and Exchange Commission this spring, a new study by Rice University and Cornell University shows just how S&P 500 companies have tied CEO compensation to performance. The study found large variations in the choice of performance measures, and the researchers said that companies tend to choose measures that are informative of CEO actions.

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Clinical Infectious Diseases
HIV+ women respond well to HPV vaccine
A three-nation clinical trial found that a vaccine can safely help the vast majority of HIV-positive women produce antibodies against the cancer-causing human papillomavirus, even if their immune system is weak and even if they've had some prior HPV exposure.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Survey: Percent of uninsured Texans has declined since September 2013
The percentage of uninsured adults ages 18 to 64 in Texas declined from 24.8 to 23.5 between September 2013 and March 2014, according to a report released today by Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy and the Episcopal Health Foundation. The decrease in uninsured appears to be attributable to an increase in employer-sponsored health insurance.

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Sociology of Education
Local homicide rate increases cause more elementary students to fail school
A new study finds that an increase in a municipality's homicide rate causes more elementary school students in that community to fail a grade than would do so if the rate remained stable.

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
New type of barcode could make counterfeiters' lives more difficult
Counterfeiters, beware! Scientists are reporting the development of a new type of inexpensive barcode that, when added to documents or currency, could foil attempts at making forgeries. Although the tags are easy for researchers to make, they still require ingredients you can't exactly find at the local hardware store. Their report appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
International Journal of Knowledge and Web Intelligence
Ant colonies help evacuees in disaster zones
An escape route mapping system based on the behavior of ant colonies could give evacuees a better chance of reaching safe harbor after a natural disaster or terrorist attack by building a map of showing the shortest routes to shelters and providing regular updates of current situations such as fires, blocked roads or other damage via the smart phones of emergency workers and those caught up in the disaster.

Contact: Albert Ang
press@inderscience.com
Inderscience Publishers

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Fertility and Sterility
Multiple births don't have to be an inevitable result of fertility treatments
While fertility treatments have helped many people become parents, they commonly result in multiple births, increasing the risk of prematurity, and leading to lifelong complications. But this doesn't have to be the case, according to Yale School of Medicine researchers and their colleagues, who recommend sweeping changes to policy and clinical practice in a study published in the April issue of Fertility & Sterility.
March of Dimes

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
BioScience
Shade grown coffee shrinking as a proportion of global coffee production
According to a new study, over the past couple of decades, global coffee production has been shifting towards a more intensive, less environmentally friendly style. That's pretty surprising if you live in the US and you've gone to the grocery store or Starbucks, where sales of environmentally and socially conscious coffees have risen sharply and now account for half of all US coffee sales by economic value.

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology
Creative activities outside work can improve job performance
Employees who pursue creative activities outside of work may find that these activities boost their performance on the job, according to a new study by San Francisco State University organizational psychologist Kevin Eschleman and colleagues. Creative pursuits away from work seem to have a direct effect on factors such as creative problem solving and helping others while on the job.

Contact: Jonathan Morales
jmm1@sfsu.edu
415-338-1743
San Francisco State University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Developmental Psychology
How mothers help children explore right and wrong
Moms want their kids to grow up to be good people -- but how do they actually help their offspring sort out different types of moral issues? A new study shows many moms talk to their kids in ways that help them understand moral missteps.

Contact: Clea Desjardins
clea.desjardins@concordia.ca
51-484-824-245-068
Concordia University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Girls' mental health suffers when romances unfold differently than they imagined
A new study reveals that for adolescent girls, having a romantic relationship play out differently than they imagined it would has negative implications for their mental health.

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Consumer predictions: Do categories matter when predicting the lottery or stock market?
From sports to the stock market and even winning the lottery, it's in our nature to predict who or what will come out on top. But, sometimes we can't see the forest for the trees. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, people are more likely to make a prediction about something when it is grouped in a large category of similar items.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Chew on this: How does food texture impact its perceived calorie content?
Food is an intimately personal thing; we savor some tastes and despise others. But how does the way we chew and eat our food impact our overall consumption? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, people perceive foods that are either hard or have a rough texture to have fewer calories.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Charitable donation discrepancies: Why are some countries more generous than others?
When it comes to charitable giving, some countries open their collective wallets more than others. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, people who live in countries that promote equality in power and wealth are more likely to donate money than those who live in societies that expect and accept inequality.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
When identity marketing backfires: Consumers don't like to be told what they like
When choosy moms choose Jif peanut butter and sports fans who call themselves sports fans subscribe to DirecTV, identity marketing is hard at work. But what happens when this type of advertising misses the mark? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when a person's sense of ownership and freedom is threatened they are less likely to respond positively to identity marketing campaigns.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals