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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Liquid helium offers a fascinating new way to make charged molecules
A University of Leicester chemist was involved in a 'startling' new discovery.
European Union, Austrian Science Foundation

Contact: Andrew Ellis
ame2@le.ac.uk
University of Leicester

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Advanced Optical Materials
Three-dimensional metamaterials with a natural bent
In a significant breakthrough, published in Advanced Optical Materials, scientists from RIKEN, in collaboration with colleagues from ITRC, NARLabs in Taiwan, have succeeded in creating a large metamaterial, up to 4 mm x 4 mm2 in size, that is essentially isotropic, using a type of metamaterial element called a split-ring resonator.

Contact: Jens Wilkinson
jens.wilkinson@riken.jp
81-048-462-1225
RIKEN

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS Pathogens
To wilt or not to wilt
Plant breeders have long identified and cultivated disease-resistant varieties. A research team at the University of California, Riverside has now revealed a new molecular mechanism for resistance and susceptibility to a common fungus that causes wilt in susceptible tomato plants.
Los Alamos National Laboratory-UC Riverside Collaborative Program in Infectious Disease.

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
Synthetic biology on ordinary paper, results off the page
Two breakthroughs clenched by Wyss scientists, paper–based synthetic gene networks and toehold switch gene regulators, could each have revolutionary impacts on synthetic biology: the former brings synthetic biology out of the traditional confinement of a living cell, the latter provides a rational design framework to enable de-novo design of both the parts and the network of gene regulation

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Biomacromolecules
NYU researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber
Researchers have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their work has taken place on the nanoscale. For the first time, this achievement has been realized on the microscale -- a leap of magnitude in size that presents significant new opportunities for using engineered protein fibers.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
JBJS Case Connector
'Watch' cites concern about flexible reamer breakage during anatomic ACL reconstruction
JBJS Case Connector, an online case journal published by the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, has issued a 'Watch' regarding concerns over flexible reamer breakage during anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction. Flexible reamers help surgeons achieve optimal femoral-tunnel parameters, but they are prone to breakage in certain situations, as the 'Watch' article explains.

Contact: Nicola Poser
nposer@jbjs.org
781-433-1245
Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
New experiment provides route to macroscopic high-mass superpositions
University of Southampton scientists have designed a new experiment to test the foundations of quantum mechanics at the large scale.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-3212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Sea turtles' first days of life: A sprint and a ride towards safety
With new nano-sized acoustic transmitters, scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the Turtle Foundation and Queen Mary University of London followed the pathways of loggerhead turtle hatchlings. According to the study, which was primarily funded by the Kiel Cluster of Excellence 'The Future Ocean,' local oceanic conditions are believed to drive the evolution of some unique swimming behaviors. The results are published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-043-160-02807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
Precise and programmable biological circuits
A team led by ETH professor Yaakov Benenson has developed several new components for biological circuits. These components are key building blocks for constructing precisely functioning and programmable bio-computers.

Contact: Yaakov Benenson
kobi.benenson@bsse.ethz.ch
41-613-873-338
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Technology
RF heating of magnetic nanoparticles improves the thawing of cryopreserved biomaterials
Successful techniques for cryopreserving bulk biomaterials and organ systems would transform current approaches to transplantation and regenerative medicine. However, while vitrified cryopreservation holds great promise, practical application has been limited to smaller systems (cells and thin tissues) due to diffusive heat and mass transfer limitations, which are typically manifested as devitrification and cracking failures during thaw. Here we leverage a clinically proven technology platform, in magnetically heated nanoparticles, to overcome this major hurdle limiting further advancement in the field of cryopreservation.

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Bristol team creates designer 'barrel' proteins
Designer proteins that expand on nature's own repertoire, created by a team of chemists and biochemists from the University of Bristol, UK, are described in a paper published this week in Science.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Berkeley Lab study reveals molecular structure of water at gold electrodes
Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the first observations of the molecular structure of liquid water at a gold electrode under different battery charging conditions.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
IARU Sustainability Science Congress
New policymaking tool for shift to renewable energy
Multiple pathways exist to a low greenhouse gas future, all involving increased efficiency and a dramatic shift in energy supply away from fossil fuels. A new tool 'SWITCH' enables policymakers and planners to assess the economic and environmental implications of different energy scenarios. It is presented today at the congress Global Challenges: Achieving Sustainability, hosted by the University of Copenhagen.

Contact: Elisabeth Wulffeld
elisabethw@snm.ku.dk
45-21-17-91-40
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Flu viruses disguised as waste
Disguising itself as waste, the shell of the flu virus is torn apart by the cell's own disposal system, thereby releasing viral genetic information. For the first time, a research team headed by researchers at ETH Zurich has now managed to show the exact process.

Contact: Ari Helenius
ari.helenius@bc.biol.ethz.ch
41-446-326-817
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Chemistry and Biology
New TSRI studies bring scientists closer to combating dangerous unstable proteins
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have discovered a way to decrease deadly protein deposits in the heart, kidney and other organs associated with a group of human diseases called the systemic amyloid diseases.
Arlene & Arnold Goldstein, Ellison Medical Foundation, Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology at TSRI, Lita Annenberg Hazen Foundation, Scripps Research Institute, American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
New microscope collects dynamic images of the molecules that animate life
A new microscopy technology collects high-resolution images rapidly and minimizes damage to cells, meaning it can image the 3-D activity of molecules, cells, and embryos in fine detail over longer periods than was previously possible. Developed at Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus, the microscope enables cell and molecular biologists to produce stunning videos of biological processes across a range of sizes and time scales, from the movements of individual proteins to the development of entire animal embryos.

Contact: Jim Keeley
keeleyj@hhmi.org
301-215-8858
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
TSRI chemists achieve new technique with profound implications for drug development
A team from The Scripps Research Institute has established a new carbon-hydrogen activation technique that opens the door to creating a broader range of pure molecules of one-handedness or 'chirality' by eliminating previous starting material limitations.
National Institutes of Health, The Scripps Research Institute

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
EBioMedicine
Rapid test to diagnose severe sepsis
A new test, developed by University of British Columbia researchers, could help physicians predict within an hour if a patient will develop severe sepsis so they can begin treatment immediately.

Contact: Heather Amos
heather.amos@ubc.ca
604-822-3213
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal Letters
NASA-led study sees Titan glowing at dusk and dawn
New maps of Saturn's moon Titan reveal large patches of trace gases shining brightly near the north and south poles. These regions are curiously shifted off the poles, to the east or west, so that dawn is breaking over the southern region while dusk is falling over the northern one.
NASA

Contact: Liz Zubritsky
elizabeth.a.zubritsky@nasa.gov
301-614-5438
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Third substantial solar flare in 2 days
The sun erupted with another significant flare today, peaking at 10:28 a.m. EDT on Oct. 22, 2014. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the event, which occurred in the lower half of the sun. This flare is classified as an X1.6 class flare. X-class flares denote the most extreme flares. This is the third substantial flare from the same region of the sun since Oct. 19.
NASA

Contact: Susan Hendrix
Susan.m.hendrix@nasa.gov
301-286-7745
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Review of Scientific Instruments
Strengthening thin-film bonds with ultrafast data collection
When studying extremely fast reactions in ultrathin materials, two measurements are better than one. A new research tool invented by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University and NIST captures information about both temperature and crystal structure during extremely fast reactions in thin-film materials.

Contact: Michael Baum
michael.baum@nist.gov
301-975-2763
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
ACS Nano
NIST offers electronics industry 2 ways to snoop on self-organizing molecules
The idea of a practical manufacturing process based on getting molecules to organize themselves in useful nanoscale shapes once seemed a little fantastic. Now the day isn't far off when your cell phone may depend on it. Two recent papers by researchers at NIST, MIT and IBM demonstrate complementary approaches to 3-D imaging of nanoscale polymer patterns for use in semiconductor lithography.

Contact: Michael Baum
michael.baum@nist.gov
301-975-2763
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Chemical Physical Letters
New insights on carbonic acid in water
A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers provides valuable new insight into aqueous carbonic acid with important implications for both geological and biological concerns.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Finding durable foul-release coatings to control invasive mussel attachment
The Bureau of Reclamation has released a report summarizing six years of testing coatings to control the attachment of quagga and zebra mussels to water and power facilities. Since the study began in 2008, Reclamation has tested more than 100 coatings and materials.
Bureau of Reclaimation

Contact: Peter Soeth
psoeth@usbr.gov
303-445-3615
Bureau of Reclamation

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Journal of Bone & Mineral Research
Paralyzed patients have weaker bones and a higher risk of fractures than expected
People paralyzed by spinal cord injuries lose mechanical strength in their leg bones faster, and more significantly, than previously believed, putting them at greater risk for fractures from minor stresses, according to a study by researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The results suggest that physicians should begin therapies for such patients sooner to maintain bone mass and strength, and should think beyond standard bone density tests when assessing fracture risk in osteoporosis patients.

Contact: Michael Cohen
mcohen@wpi.edu
508-868-4778
Worcester Polytechnic Institute