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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
eLife
Scientists restore hearing in noise-deafened mice, pointing way to new therapies
Scientists have restored the hearing of mice partly deafened by noise, using advanced tools to boost the production of a key protein in their ears. By demonstrating the importance of the protein, called NT3, in maintaining communication between the ears and brain, these new findings pave the way for research in humans that could improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise exposure and normal aging.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Hearing Health Foundation

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management
Pharmaceuticals and the water-fish-osprey food web
Ospreys do not carry significant amounts of human pharmaceutical chemicals, despite widespread occurrence of these chemicals in water, a recent U.S. Geological Survey and Baylor University study finds. These research findings, published by Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management is the first published study that examines the bioaccumulation of pharmaceuticals in the water-fish-osprey food web.

Contact: Jen Lynch
jen.lynch@setac.org
850-469-150-0109
Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Findings point to an 'off switch' for drug resistance in cancer
Like a colony of bacteria or species of animals, cancer cells within a tumor must evolve to survive. A dose of chemotherapy may kill hundreds of thousands of cancer cells, for example, but a single cell with a unique mutation can survive and quickly generate a new batch of drug-resistant cells, making cancer hard to combat. Scientists at the Salk Institute have uncovered details about how cancer is able to become drug resistant over time.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Stress-related inflammation may increase risk for depression
Preexisting differences in the sensitivity of a key part of each individual's immune system to stress confer a greater risk of developing stress-related depression or anxiety
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Johnson and Johnson International Mental Health Research Organization, Irma T. Hirschl/Monique Weill-Caulier Trust, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Brain and Behavior Research Organization

Contact: Elizabeth Dowling
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Supercomputers link proteins to drug side effects
New medications created by pharmaceutical companies have helped millions of Americans alleviate pain and suffering from their medical conditions. However, the drug creation process often misses many side effects that kill at least 100,000 patients a year.

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
See-through, one-atom-thick, carbon electrodes powerful tool to study brain disorders
A graphene, one-atom-thick microelectrode now solves a major problem for investigators looking at brain circuitry. Pinning down the details of how individual neural circuits operate in epilepsy and other brain disorders requires real-time observation of their locations, firing patterns, and other factors.
National Institutes of Health, Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy, Mirowski Family Foundation

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Hazardous Materials
New study charts the fate of chemicals affecting health and the environment
In a new study, Rolf Halden, PhD, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, examines the trajectory of chemicals appearing as emergent threats to human or environmental health. Halden's meta-analysis of 143,000 peer-reviewed research papers tracks the progress of these chemicals of emerging concern, revealing patters of emergence from obscurity to peak concern and eventual decline, over a span of 30 years.

Contact: RICHARD HARTH
richard.harth@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
WSU researchers see how plants optimize their repair
Researchers led by a Washington State University biologist have found the optimal mechanism by which plants heal the botanical equivalent of a bad sunburn. Their work, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could lead to the development of crops that can repair the sun's damage more easily, improving yields and profitability.
Washington State Agricultural Research Center, National Science Foundation, United States-Israel Binational Agricultural Research and Development Fund, Israel Science Foundation, Human Frontier Science Program Organization

Contact: Helmut Kirchhoff
kirchhh@wsu.edu
509-335-3304
Washington State University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
GSA 2014 Annual Meeting
Heavy metal frost? A new look at a Venusian mystery
enus is hiding something beneath its brilliant shroud of clouds: a first order mystery about the planet that researchers may be a little closer to solving because of a new re-analysis of twenty-year-old spacecraft data.

Contact: Christa Stratton
cstratton@geosociety.org
778-331-7625
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Massive debris pile reveals risk of huge tsunamis in Hawaii
A mass of marine debris discovered in a giant sinkhole in the Hawaiian islands provides evidence that at least one mammoth tsunami, larger than any in Hawaii's recorded history, has struck the islands, and that a similar disaster could happen again, new research finds. Scientists are reporting that a wall of water up to nine meters (30 feet) high surged onto Hawaiian shores about 500 years ago. A 9.0-magnitude earthquake off the coast of the Aleutian Islands triggered the mighty wave, which left behind up to nine shipping containers worth of ocean sediment in a sinkhole on the island of Kauai.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research
Interleukin-27: Can a cytokine with both pro & anti-inflammatory activity make a good drug target?
Interleukin-27, a member of the interleukin family of cytokines that help regulate the immune system, has a mainly anti-inflammatory role in the body, and its dysfunction has been implicated in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease. More recently, IL-27's proinflammatory activity and role in chronic inflammatory diseases is becoming increasingly clear, and a new Review article that explores the potential to target a range of diseases that share common IL-27-activated mechanisms is presented in.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Facetless crystals that mimic starfish shells could advance 3-D-printing pills
In a design that mimics a hard-to-duplicate texture of starfish shells, University of Michigan engineers have made rounded crystals that have no facets.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Physical Review Letters
Wild molecular interactions in a new hydrogen mixture
Hydrogen responds to pressure and temperature extremes differently. Under ambient conditions hydrogen is a gaseous two-atom molecule. As confinement pressure increases, the molecules adopt different states of matter -- like when water ice melts to liquid. Scientists, including Carnegie's Alexander Goncharov, combined hydrogen with its heavier sibling deuterium and created a novel, disordered, 'Phase IV'-material. The molecules interact differently than have been observed before, which could be valuable for controlling superconducting and thermoelectric properties of new materials.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Alex Goncharov
agoncharov@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Materials
Goldilocks principle wrong for particle assembly: Too hot and too cold is just right
Microscopic particles that bind under low temperatures will melt as temperatures rise to moderate levels, but re-connect under hotter conditions, a team of NYU scientists has found. Their discovery points to new ways to create 'smart materials,' cutting-edge materials that adapt to their environment by taking new forms, and to sharpen the detail of 3-D printing.
National Science Foundation, NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Acta Crystallographica Section A
Towards controlled dislocations
Klie and co-workers have used atomic-resolution Z-contrast imaging and X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to explore dislocations in the binary II-VI semiconductor CdTe, commercially used in thin-film photovoltaics. The results may lead to eventual improvement in the conversion efficiency of CdTe solar cells. These novel insights into atomically resolved chemical structure of dislocations have potential for understanding many more defect-based phenomena.
US Department of Energy Sunshot Program

Contact: Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Geophysical Research -- Oceans
The breathing sand
New analytical methods show for the first time, how the permeable, sandy sediment at the bottom of the North Sea is supplied with oxygen and which factors determine the exchange. Based on the detailed investigation and new measurement technology described by a research team led by GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the turnover of organic matter and nutrients at the sea floor as well as future changes within the dynamic ecosystem can be better assessed.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-043-160-02807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Chemical Science
NUS-led research team develops novel solutions to fight the obesity gene
A research team led by scientists from the National University of Singapore has identified several potent inhibitors that selectively target FTO, the common fat mass and obesity-associated gene.

Contact: Carolyn Fong
carolyn@nus.edu.sg
65-651-65399
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Science
Winning by losing
The more energy you put in, the more light you get out -- this general rule does not apply to the coupled laser systems studied at the Vienna University of Technology and Washington University in St. Louis. Increasing the energy can switch the laser off, reducing its energy may switch it on. Paradoxical laser coupling effects could be used for opto-electronics or opto-mechanics.

Contact: Florian Aigner
florian.aigner@tuwien.ac.at
43-158-801-41027
Vienna University of Technology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Structural and Molecular Biology
Structure of an iron-transport protein revealed
For the first time, the three dimensional structure of the protein that is essential for iron import into cells, has been elucidated. Biochemists of the University of Zurich have paved the way towards a better understanding of iron metabolism. The results also provide a basis for novel approaches to treat iron-related metabolic diseases.

Contact: Raimund Dutzler
dutzler@bioc.uzh.ch
41-446-356-550
University of Zurich

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Europhysics Letters
Scientists create possible precursor to life
How did life originate? And can scientists create life? These questions not only occupy the minds of scientists interested in the origin of life, but also researchers working with technology of the future. If we can create artificial living systems, we may not only understand the origin of life -- we can also revolutionize the future of technology.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
NTU scientists discover new molecule from local herb with potential for drug development
Scientists at Nanyang Technological University have discovered a new molecule which can join together chains of amino acids -- the building blocks of protein.
National Research Foundation, Prime Minister's Office -- Singapore

Contact: Lester Kok
lesterkok@ntu.edu.sg
Nanyang Technological University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Photonics
Physicists build reversible laser tractor beam
Physicists have built a tractor beam that can repel and attract objects, using a hollow laser beam, bright around the edges and dark in its center. It is the first long-distance optical tractor beam, 100 times larger than previous.

Contact: Dr. Cyril Hnatovsky
cyril.hnatovsky@anu.edu.au
61-420-526-032
Australian National University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Physics
1980s American aircraft helps quantum technology take flight
The X-29, an American experimental aircraft has inspired University of Sydney quantum computing researchers in a development which will bring the technology out of the lab.
US Army Research Office, Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, Office of the Director of National Intelligence

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-293-514-312
University of Sydney

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Winning the war against Human parainfluenza virus
Researchers at Griffith University's Institute for Glycomics have moved a step closer to identifying a treatment for the dreaded Human parainfluenza virus.

Contact: Skye Small
skye.small@griffith.edu.au
047-849-4898
Griffith University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
Study shows no relationship between moderate adolescent cannabis use and exam results, IQ
A large UK study has found that occasional adolescent cannabis use does not lead to poorer educational and intellectual performance, but that heavy cannabis use is associated with slightly poorer exam results at age 16. The results come from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children a long-term study that follows the health of children born in the Bristol area in 1991 and 1992
UK Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, University of Bristol

Contact: Press Officer
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology