Online Certification & Courses Nanotechnology Module

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
21-Nov-2014 20:57
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

News By Subject

Chemistry & Physics


Search this subject:

 
Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Investigational drug reduces high potassium levels in chronic kidney disease patients
Research published today found that the investigational drug patiromer decreased high potassium levels and maintained normal potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease. The results of a multicenter trial appear in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Relypsa, Inc.

Contact: Bill Seiler
bseiler@umm.edu
410-328-8919
University of Maryland Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Applied Physics Letters
New terahertz device could strengthen security
We are all familiar with the security hassles that accompany air travel. Now a new type of security detection that uses terahertz radiation is looking to prove its promise. Northwestern University researchers have developed a room temperature, compact, tunable terahertz source that could lead to advances in homeland security and space exploration. Able to detect explosives, chemical agents and dangerous biological substances from safe distances, devices using terahertz waves could make public spaces more secure than ever.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Homeland Security, Naval Air Systems Command, NASA

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
eLife
Life's extremists may be an untapped source of antibacterial drugs
Life's extremists, a family of microbes called Archaea, may be an untapped source of new antibacterial drugs. That conclusion arises from the discovery of the first antibacterial gene in this ancient lineage.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Communication Research
Not all baseball stars treated equally in TV steroid coverage, says study of network news
Retired baseball stars Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro each had Hall of Fame-worthy numbers, each hitting more than 500 home runs. All three also were tarred by allegations of steroid use. Their stories, however, received very different treatment over 12 years of national television news coverage, says University of Illinois professor Brian Quick, lead author on a paper about that coverage and its effects, published online Nov. 20 by the journal Communication Research.

Contact: Craig Chamberlain
cdchambe@illinois.edu
217-333-2894
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 -Geneva, 21-22 November
Annals of Oncology
Immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in brain cancers
New evidence that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma and brain metastases presented at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 -Geneva, 21-22 November
Annals of Oncology
Possibilities for personalized vaccines revealed at ESMO symposium
The possibilities for personalized vaccines in all types of cancer are revealed today at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
A coating that protects against heat and oxidation
Researchers have developed a coating technique that they plan to use to protect turbine engine and waste incinerator components against heat and oxidation. A topcoat from micro-scaled hollow aluminum oxide spheres provides heat insulation, in the lab, already proved more economical than conventional techniques.

Contact: Dr. Vladislav Kolarik
vladislav.kolarik@ict.fraunhofer.de
49-721-464-0147
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Neuron
TSRI researchers find how mutant gene can cause deafness
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have discovered how one gene is essential to hearing, uncovering a cause of deafness and suggesting new avenues for therapies.
National Institutes of Health, Dorris Neuroscience Center, Skaggs Insitute for Chemical Biology, Bundy Foundation

Contact: Madeline McCurry Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
Discovery sheds light on nuclear reactor fuel behavior during a severe event
A new discovery about the atomic structure of uranium dioxide will help scientists select the best computational model to simulate severe nuclear reactor accidents.
DOE/Office of Science, DOE/Small Business Innovation Research Program

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Angewandte Chemie
UC Irvine-Italian researchers create first inhibitor for enzyme linked to cancers
Recent studies showing acid ceramidase (AC) to be upregulated in melanoma, lung and prostate cancers have made the enzyme a desired target for novel synthetic inhibitor compounds. This week in Angewandte Chemie, a top journal in chemistry, UC Irvine and Italian Institute of Technology scientists describe the very first class of AC inhibitors that may aid in the efficacy of chemotherapies.
Carlsberg Foundation

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
Deep-earth carbon offers clues on origin of life on Earth
Scientist reveal details about carbon deep beneath the Earth's surface and suggest ways it might have influenced the history of life on the planet.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Jill Rosen
jrosen@jhu.edu
443-997-9906
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
UO-industry collaboration points to improved nanomaterials
A potential path to identify imperfections and improve the quality of nanomaterials for use in next-generation solar cells has emerged from a collaboration of University of Oregon and industry researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
How to estimate the magnetic field of an exoplanet?
Scientists developed a new method which allows to estimate the magnetic field of a distant exoplanet, i.e., a planet, which is located outside the Solar system and orbits a different star. Moreover, they managed to estimate the value of the magnetic moment of the planet HD 209458b. The group of scientists including one of the researchers of the Lomonosov State University published their article in the Science magazine.

Contact: Ilya Usov
science-release@rector.msu.ru
Lomonosov Moscow State University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
The Veterinary Journal
Biomarker could provide early warning of kidney disease in cats
Researchers have developed a new biomarker called 'SDMA' that can provide earlier identification of chronic kidney disease in cats, which is one of the leading causes of their death. When a test is commercialized, it could help pet owners add months or years to the life of their cat.
Hill's Pet Nutrition, Inc.

Contact: Jean Hall
jean.hall@oregonstate.edu
541-737-6537
Oregon State University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Astrophysical Journal
It's filamentary: How galaxies evolve in the cosmic web
How do galaxies like our Milky Way form, and just how do they evolve? Are galaxies affected by their surrounding environment? An international team of researchers, led by astronomers at the University of California, Riverside, proposes some answers. The researchers highlight the role of the 'cosmic web' -- a large-scale web-like structure comprised of galaxies -- on the evolution of galaxies that took place in the distant universe, a few billion years after the Big Bang.
Space Telescope Science Institute, NASA

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature Chemistry
Quantum mechanical calculations reveal the hidden states of enzyme active sites
Enzymes carry out fundamental biological processes such as photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and respiration, with the help of clusters of metal atoms as 'active' sites. But scientists lack basic information about their function because the states thought to be critical to their chemical abilities cannot be experimentally observed. Now, researchers at Princeton University have reported the first direct observation of the electronic states of iron-sulfur clusters, common to many enzyme active sites.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tien Nguyen
tienn@princeton.edu
Princeton University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Immunity
Every step you take: STING pathway key to tumor immunity
A protein complex known as STING plays a crucial role in detecting the presence of tumor cells and promoting an aggressive anti-tumor response by the body's innate immune system, according to two separate studies in Immunity. The results have major implications for the growing field of cancer immunotherapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Ludwig Cancer Research, Foglia Family Foundation

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Optometry and Vision Science
Contact lens discomfort linked to changes in lipid layer of tear film
Changes in the lipid layer of the eyes' natural tear film may contribute to the common problem of contact lens discomfort, reports a study in the December issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Contact: Connie Hughes
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com
646-674-6348
Wolters Kluwer Health

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Physical Review X
New technique allows ultrasound to penetrate bone, metal
Researchers have developed a technique that allows ultrasound to penetrate bone or metal, using customized structures that offset the distortion usually caused by these so-called 'aberrating layers.'
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Journal of Archaeological Science
Laser from a plane discovers Roman goldmines in Spain
Hidden under the vegetation and crops of the Eria Valley, in León (Spain), there is a gold mining network created by the Romans two thousand years ago, as well as complex hydraulic works, such as river diversions, to divert water to the mines of the precious metal. Researchers from the University of Salamanca made the discovery from the air with an airborne laser teledetection system.

Contact: SINC
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
NRL scientists discover novel metamaterial properties within hexagonal boron nitride
Researchers have demonstrated that confined surface phonon polaritons within hexagonal boron nitride exhibit unique metamaterial properties that enable novel nanoscale optical devices.

Contact: Daniel Parry
daniel.parry@nrl.navy.mil
202-767-2541
Naval Research Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
PharmaMar presents results at EORTC-NCI-AACR to highlight a pipeline of targeted therapies
PharmaMar will present data at the EORTC-NCI-AACR for its drug Yondelis and several investigational compounds, highlighting its pipeline of targeted therapies. Some of the most relevant results showed will focus on the mechanism of action of Aplidin, a drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of multiple myeloma, and the activity of a new antibody-drug conjugate on HER-2 positive tumor cells and xenograft tumors.

Contact: Carolina Pola
cpola@pharmamar.com
34-608-933-677
Pharmamar

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Development
How fallopian tubes carry eggs unidirectionally
Researchers in Japan have revealed the mechanism that determines the direction of the transportation of eggs in the fallopian tube connecting the ovaries and uterus.

Contact: Office of Public Relations
press@nibb.ac.jp
National Institutes of Natural Sciences

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Optica
A path to brighter images and more efficient LCD displays
University of Utah engineers have developed a polarizing filter that allows in more light, leading the way for mobile device displays that last much longer on a single battery charge and cameras that can shoot in dim light.
NASA, US Department of Energy, Utah Science Technology and Research Economic Development Initiative

Contact: Vince Horiuchi
vincent.horiuchi@utah.edu
801-585-7499
University of Utah

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Astrophysical Journal Letters
Unravelling the mystery of gamma-ray bursts
A team of scientists hope to trace the origins of gamma-ray bursts with the aid of giant space 'microphones.' Researchers at Cardiff University are trying to work out the possible sounds scientists might expect to hear when the ultra-sensitive LIGO and Virgo detectors are switched on in 2015. Dr. Francesco Pannarale and Dr. Frank Ohme, in Cardiff University's School of Physics and Astronomy, are exploring the potential of seeing and hearing events that astronomers know as short gamma-ray bursts.

Contact: Dr. Frank Ohme
ohmef@cardiff.ac.uk
44-079-713-96008
Cardiff University