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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Journal of Parkinson's Disease
Anti-inflammatory drug can prevent neuron loss in Parkinson's model
An experimental anti-inflammatory drug can protect vulnerable neurons and reduce motor deficits in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.
Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology
Scientists test nanoparticle 'alarm clock' to awaken immune systems put to sleep by cancer
Researchers explore ways to wake up the immune system with nanoparticles so it recognizes and attacks invading cancer cells.

Contact: Donna Dubuc
Donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Astrobiology
Bacteria manipulate salt to build shelters to hibernate
Spanish researchers have detected an unknown interaction between microorganisms and salt. When Escherichia coli cells are introduced into a droplet of salt water and is left to dry, bacteria manipulate the sodium chloride crystallisation to create biomineralogical biosaline three dimensional morphologically complex formations, where they hibernate. Afterwards, simply by rehydrating the material, bacteria are revived. The discovery was made by chance with a home microscope, but it made the cover of the 'Astrobiology' journal and may help to find signs of life on other planets.

Contact: SINC
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Physical Review Letters
Breakthrough laser experiment reveals liquid-like motion of atoms in an ultra-cold cluster
A new study by researchers from the University of Leicester has furthered our understanding of how tiny nanosystems function, unlocking the potential to create new materials using nanosized 'building blocks'.

Contact: Gediminas Galinis
gg97@leicester.ac.uk
University of Leicester

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Plasma and Fusion Research
Magnets for fusion energy: A revolutionary manufacturing method developed
The National Institute for Fusion Science, of the National Institutes of Natural Sciences in Japan, has achieved an electrical current of 100,000 amperes, which is by far the highest in the world, by using the new idea of assembling the state-of-the-art yttrium-based high-temperature superconducting tapes to fabricate a large-scale magnet conductor.
Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Management Expenses Grants

Contact: Nagato Yanagi
yanagi@LHD.nifs.ac.jp
National Institutes of Natural Sciences

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Neurologic recovery from corticospinal tract injury due to subfalcine herniation
After development of diffusion tensor tractography, which is derived from diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional reconstruction and estimation for three motor tracts, such as the corticospinal tract, the rubrospinal tract, and the corticoreticular pathway became possible. The corticospinal tract is known to be a major neural tract for motor function in the human brain.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Assessment on self-care ability of children with spina bifda
Spina bifda is a complex congenital central nervous system disease that is caused by the incomplete closing of the neural tubes during the embryonic phase. Many patients have varying degrees of spasticity, urinary and fecal incontinence and neurocognitive retardation. Such problems decrease the patients' functional independence and their quality of life.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
NRG1 isoforms could be an effective therapeutic candidate to promote peripheral nerve regeneration
Neuregulin 1 is a pleiotropic factor characterized by the existence of numerous isoforms arising from alternative splicing of exons that confer to the protein deeply different characteristics. NRG1 plays an important role for both the myelination occurring during development and the different phases occurring after injury in the peripheral nerve: axon degeneration, axon regrowth, remyelination and target reinnervation.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
eLife
It takes two to court
Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research, have identified the functions of two classes of pheromone receptors, and found pheromones crucial to triggering the mating process in mice.
The Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders o

Contact: Kim Bland
ksb@stowers.org
816-926-4015
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Astrophysical Journal Letters
Hubble finds 3 surprisingly dry exoplanets
Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have gone looking for water vapor in the atmospheres of three planets orbiting stars similar to the sun -- and have come up nearly dry.
NASA

Contact: Ray Villard
villard@stsci.org
410-338-4514
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Stem Cell Reports
NYSCF scientists one step closer to cell therapy for multiple sclerosis patients
For the first time, NYSCF scientists generated induced pluripotent stem cells lines from skin samples of patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis and further, they developed an accelerated protocol to induce these stem cells into becoming oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system implicated in multiple sclerosis and many other diseases.

Contact: David McKeon
dmckeon@nyscf.org
212-365-7440
New York Stem Cell Foundation

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
ORNL study reveals new characteristics of complex oxide surfaces
A combination of microscopy and data processing has given researchers an unprecedented look at the surface of a material known for its unusual physical and electrochemical properties.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
New imaging agent provides better picture of the gut
A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This safe, noninvasive method for assessing the function and properties of the GI tract in real time could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of gut diseases.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Korean Ministry of Science

Contact: Weibo Cai
wcai@uwhealth.org
608-262-1749
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New approach to form non-equilibrium structures
Northwestern University researchers get closer to understanding the fundamentals of non-equilibrium, self-assembled structures, unlocking potential in a variety of fields.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
2014 AAPT Summer Meeting
Creating sustainable STEM teacher preparation programs
A new study finds that faculty members who choose to champion physics teacher education, in combination with institutional motivation and commitment, ensure that STEM teacher education programs remain viable after initial funding ends.

Contact: James Riordon
riordon@aps.org
301-919-2173
American Physical Society

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Immune response may cause harm in brain injuries, disorders
Could the body's own immune system play a role in memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction associated with conditions like chronic epilepsy, Alzheimer's dementia and concussions? Cleveland Clinic researchers believe so, based on a study published online by PLOS ONE.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Brain Behavior Research Foundation

Contact: Tracy Wheeler
wheelet2@ccf.org
216-444-4235
Cleveland Clinic

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of the Air and Water Association
Study gives new perspective on agricultural plastic, debris burning, and air quality
A recent study published in the Journal of the Air and Water Association shows that inclusion of agricultural plastic in debris piles has no effect on smoke emissions.

Contact: Walita Kay Williams
walitakwilliams@fs.fed.us
510-559-6367
USDA Forest Service - Pacific Southwest Research Station

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Fukushima accident underscores need for US to seek out new information about nuclear plant hazards
A new congressionally mandated report from the National Academy of Sciences concludes that the overarching lesson learned from the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident is that nuclear plant licensees and their regulators must actively seek out and act on new information about hazards with the potential to affect the safety of nuclear plants.
Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Contact: Jennifer Walsh
news@nas.edu
202-334-2138
National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
University of Delaware researcher describes new approach for creating organic zeolites
In a landmark paper published in the international scientific journal Nature Communications, University of Delaware researcher Yushan Yan describes a new approach to creating organic zeolites.

Contact: Donna O'Brien
dobrien@udel.edu
University of Delaware

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Four-billion-year-old chemistry in cells today
Parts of the primordial soup in which life arose have been maintained in our cells today according to scientists at the University of East Anglia. Research published today in the Journal of Biological Chemistry reveals how cells in plants, yeast and very likely also in animals still perform ancient reactions thought to have been responsible for the origin of life -- some four billion years ago.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
International Journal of Low Radiation
Natural products from plants protect skin during cancer radiotherapy
Plant-derived natural product chemicals could offer protection to the skin from the harmful effects of gamma radiation during cancer radiotherapy, suggests research published in the International Journal of Low Radiation.

Contact: Albert Ang
press@inderscience.com
Inderscience Publishers

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
Atomic structure of key muscle component revealed in Penn study
Adding to the growing fundamental understanding of the machinery of muscle cells, a group of biophysicists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania describe in the journal Science this week -- in minute detail -- how actin filaments are stabilized at one of their ends to form a basic muscle structure called the sarcomere.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
New mass map of a distant galaxy cluster is the most precise yet
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have mapped the mass within a galaxy cluster more precisely than ever before. Created using observations from Hubble's Frontier Fields observing programme, the map shows the amount and distribution of mass within MCS J0416.1-2403, a massive galaxy cluster found to be 160 trillion times the mass of the Sun.

Contact: Georgia Bladon
gbladon@partner.eso.org
44-781-629-1261
ESA/Hubble Information Centre

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Neuron
UCSF researchers uncover an unexpected role for endostatin in the nervous system
Researchers at UC San Francisco have discovered that endostatin, a protein that once aroused intense interest as a possible cancer treatment, plays a key role in the stable functioning of the nervous system.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeffrey.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Neuron
Choice bias: A quirky byproduct of learning from reward
Many people value rewards they choose themselves more than rewards they merely receive, even when the rewards are actually equivalent. A new study in Neuron provides evidence that this long-observed quirk of behavior is a byproduct of how the brain reinforces learning from reward.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University