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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
eLife
Life's extremists may be an untapped source of antibacterial drugs
Life's extremists, a family of microbes called Archaea, may be an untapped source of new antibacterial drugs. That conclusion arises from the discovery of the first antibacterial gene in this ancient lineage.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Plant Journal
Researchers discover natural resistance gene against spruce budworm
Scientists from Université Laval, the University of British Columbia and the University of Oxford have discovered a natural resistance gene against spruce budworm in the white spruce. The breakthrough, reported in The Plant Journal, paves the way to identifying and selecting naturally resistant trees to replant forests devastated by the destructive pest.

Contact: Jean-François Huppé
jean-francois.huppe@dc.ulaval.ca
418-656-7785
Université Laval

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
Discovery sheds light on nuclear reactor fuel behavior during a severe event
A new discovery about the atomic structure of uranium dioxide will help scientists select the best computational model to simulate severe nuclear reactor accidents.
DOE/Office of Science, DOE/Small Business Innovation Research Program

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union
Time-lapse photos and synched weather data unlock Antarctic secrets
Brown University researchers are using time-lapse photography, linked to weather data, to study climate and geological change in the Antarctic Dry Valleys.

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
Deep-earth carbon offers clues on origin of life on Earth
Scientist reveal details about carbon deep beneath the Earth's surface and suggest ways it might have influenced the history of life on the planet.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Jill Rosen
jrosen@jhu.edu
443-997-9906
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
UO-industry collaboration points to improved nanomaterials
A potential path to identify imperfections and improve the quality of nanomaterials for use in next-generation solar cells has emerged from a collaboration of University of Oregon and industry researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
GPM measured Tropical Storm Adjali's rainfall before dissipation
Moderate rainfall was occurring around the center of Tropical Storm Adjali before it dissipated, according to data from NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM satellites.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature
Darwin 2.0
It has long been thought that dramatic changes in a landscape like the formation of the Andes Mountain range or the Amazon River is the main driver that initiates species to diverge. However, a recent study shows that speciation occurred much later than these dramatic geographical changes. Researchers from LSU's Museum of Natural Science have found that time and a species' ability to move play greater parts in the process of speciation. This research was published today in the print edition of Nature.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Alison Satake
asatake@lsu.edu
225-578-3870
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
American Journal of Physical Anthropology
Research finds tooth enamel fast-track in humans
Research from the University of Kent has discovered a link between prenatal enamel growth rates in teeth and weaning in human babies.
The Royal Society

Contact: Katie Newton
k.newton@kent.ac.uk
44-012-278-23581
University of Kent

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Climate Dynamics
Mediterranean meteorological tide has increased by over a millimetre a year since 1989
A new database developed by the University of Cantabria (Spain) provides data on sea level variation due to atmospheric changes in the south of Europe between 1948 and 2009. Over the last two decades sea levels have increased in the Mediterranean basin.

Contact: SINC
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Journal of Archaeological Science
Laser from a plane discovers Roman goldmines in Spain
Hidden under the vegetation and crops of the Eria Valley, in León (Spain), there is a gold mining network created by the Romans two thousand years ago, as well as complex hydraulic works, such as river diversions, to divert water to the mines of the precious metal. Researchers from the University of Salamanca made the discovery from the air with an airborne laser teledetection system.

Contact: SINC
info@agenciasinc.es
34-914-251-820
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
Caltech geologists discover ancient buried canyon in South Tibet
A team of researchers from Caltech and the China Earthquake Administration has discovered an ancient, deep canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet, north of the eastern end of the Himalayas. The geologists say that the ancient canyon -- thousands of feet deep in places -- effectively rules out a popular model used to explain how the massive and picturesque gorges of the Himalayas became so steep, so fast.

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Environmental Research Letters
Extreme weather in the Arctic problematic for people, wildlife
A new cross-disciplinary study provides a comprehensive look at the effects of an extreme weather event in the High Arctic on everything from town infrastructure to the natural environment.
Norwegian Research Council, Svalbard Environmental Fund

Contact: Brage Bremset Hansen
brage.b.hansen@ntnu.no
47-416-04443
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Out of India
Working at the edge of a coal mine in India, a team of Johns Hopkins researchers and colleagues have filled in a major gap in science's understanding of the evolution of a group of animals that includes horses and rhinos. That group likely originated on the subcontinent when it was still an island headed swiftly for collision with Asia, the researchers report Nov. 20 in the online journal Nature Communications.
National Geographic Society, Belgian Science Policy Office, National Science Foundation, Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Permafrost soil: Possible source of abrupt rise in greenhouse gases at end of last Ice Age
Scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research have identified a possible source of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that were abruptly released to the atmosphere in large quantities around 14,600 years ago.

Contact: Dr. Folke Mehrtens
medien@awi.de
49-471-483-12007
Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
Dizzying heights: Prehistoric farming on the 'roof of the world'
Archaeological findings pose questions about genetic resistance in humans to altitude sickness and genetic response in crop plants to flowering times and ultraviolet radiation tolerance.

Contact: Stuart Roberts
stuart.j.roberts@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-4982
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
Himalaya tectonic dam with a discharge
The geologic history of the famous Tsangpo Gorge, in the eastern Himalaya, now needs to be rewritten.

Contact: F. Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
China's new 'Great Wall' not so great
China's second great wall, a vast seawall covering more than half of the country's mainland coastline, is a foundation for financial gain -- and also a dyke holding a swelling rush of ecological woes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-0206
Michigan State University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
Evolution: The genetic connivances of digits and genitals
During the development of mammals, the growth and organization of digits are orchestrated by Hox genes, which are activated very early in precise regions of the embryo. These 'architect genes' are themselves regulated by a large piece of adjacent DNA. A study led by Denis Duboule, professor at the University of Geneva and the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland, reveals that this same DNA regulatory sequence also controls the architect genes during the development of the external genitals.

Contact: Denis Duboule
denis.duboule@unige.ch
41-223-796-771
Université de Genève

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
Major new study reveals new similarities and differences between mice and humans
Powerful clues have been discovered about why the human immune system, metabolism, stress response, and other life functions are so different from those of the mouse. A new, comprehensive study of the mouse genome by an international team reveals striking similarities and differences with the human genome. The study may lead to better use of mouse models in medical research.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
American Public Works Association Western Snow and Ice Conference
Cut the salt: Green solutions for highway snow and ice control
Ice-free pavement. 'Smart snowplows.' Vegetable juice ice-melt. Cold-climate researchers at Washington State University are clearing the road with green alternatives to the salt, sand and chemicals typically used for highway snow and ice control.

Contact: Xianming Shi
Xianming.shi@wsu.edu
509-335-7088
Washington State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature Climate Change
Climate change will slow China's progress in reducing infectioius diseases
A new study found that by 2030, changes to the global climate could delay China's progress reducing diarrheal and vector-borne diseases by up to seven years.

Contact: Melva Robertson
melva.robertson@emory.edu
404-727-5692
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
Crops play a major role in the annual CO2 cycle increase
In a study published Wednesday, Nov. 19, in Nature, scientists at Boston University, the University of New Hampshire, the University of Michigan, the University of Minnesota, the University of Wisconsin-Madison and McGill University show that a steep rise in the productivity of crops grown for food accounts for as much as 25 percent of the increase in this carbon dioxide seasonality.

Contact: Chris Kucharik
kucharik@wisc.edu
608-890-3021
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Adjali making the curve
Tropical Storm Adjali started curving to the southwest on its trek through the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on Nov. 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Study: Environmental bleaching impairs long-term coral reproduction
Professor Don Levitan, chair of the Department of Biological Science, writes in the latest issue of Marine Ecology Progress Series that bleaching -- a process where high water temperatures or UV light stresses the coral to the point where it loses its symbiotic algal partner that provides the coral with color -- is also affecting the long-term fertility of the coral.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University