EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
2-Sep-2014 18:24
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

News By Subject

Earth Science


Search this subject:

 
Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
NASA satellites calling here you come again, Tropical Storm Dolly
Tropical Storm Dolly visited Mexico six years ago, and NASA satellite data is calling 'Here you come again,' reminiscent of the famous country singer's hit song, as another storm named Dolly heads for a second landfall in Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres
This week From AGU: California earthquake, future Mars rovers, models underestimate ozone
This week From AGU: California earthquake, future Mars rovers, models underestimate ozone.

Contact: Alexandra Branscombe
abranscombe@agu.org
202-777-7516
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
New synthesis method may shape future of nanostructures, clean energy
A team of University of Maryland physicists has published new nanoscience advances that they and other scientists say make possible new nanostructures and nanotechnologies with huge potential applications ranging from clean energy and quantum computing advances to new sensor development.
Office of Naval Research, U.S. Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Research Corporation

Contact: Lee Tune
ltune@umd.edu
301-405-4679
University of Maryland

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Conservation Biology
Extinctions during human era worse than thought
The gravity of the world's current extinction rate becomes clearer upon knowing what it was before people came along. A new estimate finds that species die off as much as 1,000 times more frequently nowadays than they used to. That's 10 times worse than the old estimate of 100 times.

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Limnology & Oceanography
Underwater grass comeback bodes well for Chesapeake Bay
The Susquehanna Flats, a large bed of underwater grasses in the upper Chesapeake Bay, virtually disappeared after Tropical Storm Agnes more than 40 years ago. The grasses mysteriously began to come back in the early 2000s. Today the bed is one of the biggest and healthiest in the Bay, spanning some 20 square miles. Scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are figuring out what's behind the comeback.

Contact: Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics
Observing the onset of a magnetic substorm
Magnetic substorms, the disruptions in geomagnetic activity that cause brightening of aurora, may sometimes be driven by a different process than generally thought, a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics shows.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Functional Ecology
Aging gracefully: Diving seabirds shed light on declines with age
Scientists who studied long-lived diving birds, which represent valuable models to examine aging in the wild, found that blood oxygen stores, resting metabolism and thyroid hormone levels all declined with age, although diving performance did not. Apparently, physiological changes do occur with age in long-lived species, but they may have no detectable effect on behavioral performance.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Oceans apart: Study reveals insights into the evolution of languages
A new Journal of Evolutionary Biology study provides evidence that physical barriers formed by oceans can influence language diversification.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Journal of Industrial Ecology
Researchers reveal carbon emissions of PlayStation®3 game distribution
It's not always true that digital distribution of media will have lower carbon emissions than distribution by physical means, at least when file sizes are large.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
eLife
War between bacteria and phages benefits humans
In our battle with cholera bacteria, we may have an unknown ally in bacteria-killing viruses known as phages. Researchers from Tufts University and elsewhere report that phages can force cholera bacteria, even during active infection in humans, to give up their virulence in order to survive.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Canada Reserach Chairs, Charles A. King Trust Postdoctoral Research Fellows

Contact: Siobhan Gallagher
Siobhan.gallagher@tufts.edu
617-636-6586
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Migrating birds sprint in spring, but take things easy in autumn
Passerine birds, also known as perching birds, that migrate by night tend to fly faster in spring than they do in autumn to reach their destinations. This seasonal difference in flight speed is especially noticeable among birds that only make short migratory flights, says researcher Cecilia Nilsson of Lund University in Sweden, in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Chemical Geology
Scientists obtain new data on the weather 10,000 years ago from sediments of a lake in Sierra Nevada
Scientists have found evidence of atmospheric dust from the Sahara in the depths of the Rio Seco lake, 3,020 meters above sea level, accumulated over the last 11,000 years.

Contact: Antonio García-Alix Daroca
agalix@ugr.es
34-958-243-976
University of Granada

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists create renewable fossil fuel alternative using bacteria
Researchers have engineered the harmless gut bacteria E. coli to generate renewable propane.
European Research Council

Contact: Gail Wilson
gail.wilson@imperial.ac.uk
44-020-759-46702
Imperial College London

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Geology
Plant life forms in the fossil record: When did the first canopy flowers appear?
Most plant fossils are isolated organs, making it difficult to reconstruct the type of plant life or its ecosystem structure. In their study for GEOLOGY, published online on 28 Aug. 2014, researchers Camilla Crifò and colleagues used leaf vein density, a trait visible on leaf compression fossils, to document the occurrence of stratified forests with a canopy dominated by flowering plants.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Surprising new role for calcium in sensing pain
When you accidentally touch a hot oven, you rapidly pull your hand away. Duke researchers have made a surprising discovery in worms about the role of calcium in such pain signaling. They have built a structural model of the molecule that allows calcium ions to pass into a neuron, triggering a signal of pain. These discoveries may help direct new strategies to treat pain in people.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Esther A. and Joseph Klingenstein Fund, Whitehall Foundation, Duke University

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Chaos
Giant garbage patches help redefine ocean boundaries
Researchers have created a new model that could help determine what area of the world is to blame for each ocean garbage patch of floating debris -- a difficult task for a system as complex and massive as the ocean. The researchers describe the model in a paper published in the journal Chaos.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
World Water Week
The key to drilling wells with staying power in the developing world
A UNC study found that if local water communities collect fees for repairs and train community members to fix the wells, they can remain in use for decades.
Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

Contact: Johnny Cruz
jcruz@worldvision.org
253-815-2072
World Vision

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Exceptionally well preserved insect fossils from the Rhône Valley
In Bavaria, the Tithonian Konservat-Lagerstätte of lithographic limestone is well known as a result of numerous discoveries of emblematic fossils from that area (for example, Archaeopteryx). Now, for the first time, researchers have found fossil insects in the French equivalent of these outcrops -- discoveries which include a new species representing the oldest known water treader.

Contact: Nel Andre
anel@mnhn.fr
PeerJ

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sierra Nevada freshwater runoff could drop 26 percent by 2100, UC study finds
Freshwater runoff from the Sierra Nevada may decrease by as much as one-quarter by 2100 due to climate warming on the high slopes, according to scientists at UC Irvine and UC Merced.
National Science Foundation, Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory, US Department of Energy

Contact: Laura Rico
lrico@uci.edu
949-824-9055
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Seismological Research Letters
Likely near-simultaneous earthquakes complicate seismic hazard planning for Italy
Before the shaking from one earthquake ends, shaking from another might begin, amplifying the effect of ground motion. Such sequences of closely timed, nearly overlapping, consecutive earthquakes account for devastating seismic events in Italy's history and should be taken into account when building new structures, according to research published in the September issue of the journal Seismological Research Letters.

Contact: Nan Broadbent
press@seismosoc.org
408-431-9885
Seismological Society of America

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Seismological Research Letters
Experts defend operational earthquake forecasting, counter critiques
Experts defend operational earthquake forecasting (OEF) in an editorial published in the Seismological Research Letters, arguing the importance of public communication as part of a suite of activities intended to improve public safety and mitigate damage from earthquakes. In a related article, Italian scientists detail the first official OEF system in Italy.

Contact: Nan Broadbent
press@seismosoc.org
408-431-9885
Seismological Society of America

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature Climate Change
Changing global diets is vital to reducing climate change
Healthier diets and reducing food waste are part of a combination of solutions needed to ensure food security and avoid dangerous climate change, say the team behind a new study.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature Geoscience
Antarctic sea-level rising faster than global rate
A new study of satellite data from the last 19 years reveals that fresh water from melting glaciers has caused the sea-level around the coast of Antarctica to rise by 2 cm more than the global average of 6 cm.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature
Discovery reveals how bacteria distinguish harmful vs. helpful viruses
Viruses can kill bacterial cells or, under the right circumstances, lend them helpful genes that the bacterium could harness to, say, better attack its own hosts. Experiments at Rockefeller University have now revealed that one type of bacterial immune system can distinguish viral foe from friend, and it does so by watching for one particular cue.

Contact: Zach Veilleux
veillez@rockefeller.edu
212-327-8982
Rockefeller University

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
The ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
Not all phytoplankton in the ocean need to take their vitamins
Some species of marine phytoplankton, such as the prolific bloomer Emiliania huxleyi, can grow without consuming vitamin B1 (thiamine), researchers have discovered.
National Center for Genome Resources, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Packard Foundation

Contact: Lindsay Jolivet
lindsay.jolivet@cifar.ca
416-971-4876
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research