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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
NASA begins hurricane mission with Global Hawk flight to Cristobal
The first of two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft landed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia, on Aug. 27 after surveying Hurricane Cristobal for the first science flight of NASA's latest hurricane airborne mission.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
NASA's TRMM Satellite sees powerful towering storms in Cristobal
NASA's TRMM satellite identified areas of heavy rainfall occurring in Hurricane Cristobal as it continued strengthening on approach to Bermuda.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Journal of Geology
Nanodiamonds are forever
A new study focuses on the character and distribution of nanodiamonds across 50 million square kilometers of the Northern Hemisphere.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-089-37220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Water 'thermostat' could help engineer drought-resistant crops
Researchers have identified a gene that could help engineer drought-resistant crops. The gene, called OSCA1, encodes a protein in the cell membrane of plants that senses changes in water availability and adjusts the plant's water conservation machinery accordingly. The findings appear in the journal Nature and could make it easier to feed the world's growing population in the face of climate change.
US Department of Agriculture, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
NASA sees massive Marie close enough to affect southern California coast
Two NASA satellites captured visible and infrared pictures that show the massive size of Hurricane Marie. Marie is so large that it is bringing rough surf to the southern coast of California while almost nine hundred miles west of Baja California.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
American Meteorological Society’s Journal of Climate
Southwest may face 'megadrought' this century
Due to global warming, scientists say, the chances of the southwestern United States experiencing a decade long drought is at least 50 percent, and the chances of a 'megadrought' -- one that lasts over 30 years -- ranges from 20 to 50 percent over the next century.
National Science Foundation, National Center for Atmospheric Research, US Geological Survey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Karina's remnants drawn into Hurricane Marie's spin
Karina finally became a remnant low pressure area after roaming around in the Eastern Pacific for two weeks. Satellite data on August 27 showed that the now shapeless former hurricane was being drawn into nearby Hurricane Marie's circulation.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Snowfall in a warmer world
A study finds big snowstorms will still occur in the Northern Hemisphere following global warming.

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Veld Fires in South Africa
South Africa is entering what is described by the Volunteer Wildfire Services of South Africa as 'Cape Fire Season.' The Eastern Cape provincial government warned residents in certain parts of the province on Monday of strong winds and veld fires.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Marine Pollution Bulletin
NOAA's Marine Debris Program reports on the national issue of derelict fishing traps
Thousands of fishing traps are lost or abandoned each year in US waters. The NOAA report is the first of its kind to examine the derelict fish trap problem, nationally, and recommends actions to better manage and prevent it.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Keeley Belva
keeley.belva@noaa.gov
301-643-6463
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Geology
Pacific plate shrinking as it cools
The Pacific tectonic plate is not as rigid as scientists believe, according to new calculations by researchers at Rice University and the University of Nevada, Reno.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Cretaceous Research
Penn paleontologists describe a possible dinosaur nest and young 'babysitter'
A new examination of a rock slab containing fossils of 24 very young dinosaurs and one older individual is suggestive of a group of hatchlings overseen by a caretaker, according to a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Happy Camp and July Fire Complexes in California
As of seven hours ago the Happy Camp Complex of fires had consumed 24,939 acres of land in Northern California, the July complex had consumed 35,530 as of eight hours ago.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
The roots of human altruism
Apes hardly ever act selflessly without being solicited by others; humans often do. What has caused this curious divergence, which is arguably the secret to our species' unparalleled success? A team headed by an anthropologist from the University of Zurich now reveals that cooperative care for the young was the evolutionary precondition for the emergence of spontaneous altruistic behavior.

Contact: Judith Burkart
Judith.burkart@aim.uzh.ch
41-446-355-402
University of Zurich

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature Methods
DTU researchers film protein quake for the first time
One of nature's mysteries is how plants survive impact by the huge amounts of energy contained in the sun's rays, while using this energy for photosynthesis. The hypothesis is that the light-absorbing proteins in the plant's blades quickly dissipate the energy throughout the entire protein molecule through so-called protein quakes. Researchers at DTU Physics have now managed to successfully 'film' this process.

Contact: Tim Brandt van Driel
tidr@fysik.dtu.dk
45-45-25-31-82
Technical University of Denmark

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Scientists looking across human, fly and worm genomes find shared biology
Researchers analyzing human, fly, and worm genomes have found that these species have a number of key genomic processes in common, reflecting their shared ancestry. The findings, appearing Aug. 28, 2014, in the journal Nature, offer insights into embryonic development, gene regulation and other biological processes vital to understanding human biology and disease.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Steve Benowitz
steven.benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Walking fish reveal how our ancestors evolved onto land
About 400 million years ago a group of fish began exploring land and evolved into tetrapods -- today's amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. But just how these ancient fish used their fishy bodies and fins in a terrestrial environment and what evolutionary processes were at play remain scientific mysteries.

Contact: Cynthia Lee
cynthia.lee@mcgill.ca
514-398-6754
McGill University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Self-deceived individuals deceive others better
Over-confident people can fool others into believing they are more talented than they actually are, a study has found.

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-782-730-9332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Global Ecology and Biogeography
New study charts the global invasion of crop pests
Many of the world's most important crop-producing countries will be fully saturated with pests by the middle of the century if current trends continue, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-782-730-9332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Breaking benzene
In research published in Nature, Zhaomin Hou and colleagues from the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science in Japan have demonstrated a way to use a metallic complex, trinuclear titanium hydride, to accomplish the task of activating benzene by breaking the aromatic carbon-carbon bonds at relatively mild temperatures and in a highly selective way.

Contact: Jens Wilkinson
jens.wilkinson@riken.jp
81-048-462-1225
RIKEN

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Stone-tipped spears lethal, may indicate early cognitive and social skills
Attaching a stone tip on to a wooden spear shaft was a significant innovation for early modern humans living around 500,000 years ago. However, it was also a costly behavior in terms of time and effort to collect, prepare and assemble the spear. Arizona State University and University of Cape Town researchers conducted controlled experiments to learn if there was a 'wounding' advantage between using a wooden spear or a stone-tipped spear.
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Contact: Benjamin Schoville
benjamin.schoville@asu.edu
27-076-136-4669
Arizona State University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Evolution used similar molecular toolkits to shape flies, worms, and humans
Although separated by hundreds of millions of years of evolution, flies, worms, and humans share ancient patterns of gene expression, according to a massive Yale-led analysis of genomic data. Two related studies led by scientists at Harvard and Stanford, also published Aug. 28 in the same issue of the journal Nature, tell a similar story: even though humans, worms, and flies bear little obvious similarity to each other, evolution used remarkably similar molecular toolkits to shape them.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bill Hathaway
william.hathaway@yale.edu
203-432-1322
Yale University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Global Change Biology
Museum specimens, modern cities show how an insect pest will respond to climate change
Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that century-old museum specimens hold clues to how global climate change will affect a common insect pest that can weaken and kill trees -- and the news is not good.
US Geological Survey, National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Stone-tipped spears more damaging than sharpened wooden spears
Experimental comparison may show that stone-tipped spears do not penetrate as deep, but may still cause more damage, than sharpened wooden spears.
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Wolves susceptible to yawn contagion
Wolves may be susceptible to yawn contagion, according to a study published Aug. 27, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Research Fellowship, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Scientific Research on Innovative Areas

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS