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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Science
Climate change caused by ocean, not just atmosphere, new Rutgers study finds
Most of the concerns about climate change have focused on the amount of greenhouse gases that have been released into the atmosphere. Read about a Rutgers study published in Science that reveals another equally important factor in regulating the earth's climate.

Contact: Ken Branson
kbranson@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0580
Rutgers University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Some like it loud
Species of poison frogs that utilize bright warning coloration as protection from predators are more likely to develop louder, more complex calls than relatives that rely on camouflage. New research indicates that because these visual cues establish certain species as unsavory prey, they are free to make noisy calls in plain sight and better attract possible mates.
National Science Foundation, National Evolutionary Synthesis Center

Contact: Nicole Duncan
nicole.duncan@nescent.org
919-668-7993
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
New study finds options for climate change policy are well characterized
Policy options for climate change risk management are straightforward and have well understood strengths and weaknesses, according to a new study by the American Meteorological Society Policy Program.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., Lockheed Martin

Contact: Yael Seid-Green
yseidgreen@ametsoc.org
202-355-9821
American Meteorological Society

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Nature Geoscience
Icelandic volcano sits on massive magma hot spot
New research from University of California Davis and Aarhus University in Denmark shows that high mantle temperatures miles beneath the Earth's surface are essential for generating large amounts of magma. In fact, the scientists found that Iceland's Bardarbunga volcano lies directly above the hottest portion of the North Atlantic mantle plume.
National Science Foundation, Danish National Research Foundation

Contact: Charles Lesher
celesher@ucdavis.edu
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Climate change impacts countered by stricter fisheries management
A new study has found that implementing stricter fisheries management overcame the expected detrimental effects of climate change disturbances in coral reef fisheries badly impacted by the 1997/98 El Niño, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Satellite catches lingering remnants of Tropical Depression 9
NOAA's GOES-East satellite has been keeping an eye on the remnants of Tropical Depression 9.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Ana still vigorous
NASA's TRMM satellite saw that Tropical Storm Ana was still generating moderate rainfall is it pulled away from Hawaii. The next day, NASA's Aqua satellite saw that wind shear was having an effect on the storm as it moved over open ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Li-ion batteries contain toxic halogens, but environmentally friendly alternatives exist
Physics researchers at VCU have discovered that most of the electrolytes used in lithium-ion batteries -- commonly found in consumer electronic devices -- are superhalogens, and that the vast majority of these electrolytes contain toxic halogens.
Department of Energy

Contact: Brian McNeill
bwmcneill@vcu.edu
804-827-0889
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
PeerJ
Ebola's evolutionary roots are more ancient than previously thought, study finds
A new study is helping to rewrite Ebola's family history. The research shows that Ebola and Marburg are each members of ancient evolutionary lines, and that these two viruses last shared a common ancestor sometime prior to 16-23 million years ago.

Contact: Charlotte Hsu
chsu22@buffalo.edu
716-645-4655
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
IARU Sustainability Science Congress
Global boom in hydropower expected this decade
An unprecedented boom in hydropower dam construction is underway, primarily in developing countries and emerging economies. While this is expected to double the global electricity production from hydropower, it could reduce the number of our last remaining large free-flowing rivers by about 20 percent and pose a serious threat to freshwater biodiversity.

Contact: Elisabeth Wulffeld
elisabethw@snm.ku.dk
45-21-17-91-40
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Environmental Psychology
Nation's 'personality' influences its environmental stewardship, shows new study
Countries with higher levels of compassion and openness score better when it comes to environmental sustainability, says research from the University of Toronto.
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

Contact: Ken McGuffin
mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
NASA HS3 mission Global Hawk's bullseye in Hurricane Edouard
NASA's Hurricane Severe Storms Sentinel or HS3 mission flew the unmanned Global Hawk aircraft on two missions between Sept. 11 and 15 into Hurricane Edouard and scored a bullseye by gathering information in the eye of the strengthening storm. Scientists saw how upper-level wind shear was affecting Edouard on the HS3's Global Hawk flight of the 2014 campaign over Sept. 11 and 12, and saw the hurricane strengthen during the sixth flight on Sept. 15 and 16.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Geology
Desert streams: Deceptively simple
Volatile rainstorms drive complex landscape changes in deserts, particularly in dryland channels, which are shaped by flash flooding. Paradoxically, such desert streams have surprisingly simple topography with smooth, straight and symmetrical form that until now has defied explanation.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
NASA's Terra satellite shows a more organized Tropical Storm Ana
The strong southwesterly wind shear that has been battering Tropical Storm Ana has abated and has given the storm a chance to re-organize. Ana appeared more rounded on imagery from NASA's Terra satellite as thunderstorms again circled the low-level center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Fires in the southern United States
In this image taken by the Aqua satellite of the southern United States actively burning areas as detected by MODIS's thermal bands are outlined in red.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Birds roosting in large groups less likely to contract West Nile virus
A University of Illinois study found that when large groups of birds roost together the chances that an individual bird will get bitten by mosquitoes carrying West Nile virus and subsequently contract the disease actually go down.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Debra Levey Larson
dlarson@illinois.edu
217-244-2880
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Sea turtles' first days of life: A sprint and a ride towards safety
With new nano-sized acoustic transmitters, scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the Turtle Foundation and Queen Mary University of London followed the pathways of loggerhead turtle hatchlings. According to the study, which was primarily funded by the Kiel Cluster of Excellence 'The Future Ocean,' local oceanic conditions are believed to drive the evolution of some unique swimming behaviors. The results are published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-043-160-02807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
How ferns adapted to one of Earth's newest and most extreme environments
How ferns adapted to the extreme environmental conditions found in the high Andean mountains of South America is the focus of new research by the universities of Bristol and Sheffield, published today in PLOS ONE.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Berkeley Lab study reveals molecular structure of water at gold electrodes
Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the first observations of the molecular structure of liquid water at a gold electrode under different battery charging conditions.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Florida lizards evolve rapidly, within 15 years and 20 generations
Scientists working on islands in Florida have documented the rapid evolution of a native lizard species -- in as little as 15 years -- as a result of pressure from an invading lizard species, introduced from Cuba.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Christine Sinatra
christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu
512-853-0506
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
IARU Sustainability Science Congress
New policymaking tool for shift to renewable energy
Multiple pathways exist to a low greenhouse gas future, all involving increased efficiency and a dramatic shift in energy supply away from fossil fuels. A new tool 'SWITCH' enables policymakers and planners to assess the economic and environmental implications of different energy scenarios. It is presented today at the congress Global Challenges: Achieving Sustainability, hosted by the University of Copenhagen.

Contact: Elisabeth Wulffeld
elisabethw@snm.ku.dk
45-21-17-91-40
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Nature
No-till agriculture may not bring hoped-for boost in global crop yields, study finds
No-till farming appears to hold promise for boosting crop yields only in dry regions, not in the cool, moist areas of the world, this study found.
National Key Science and Technology Project of China

Contact: Patricia Bailey
pjbailey@ucdavis.edu
530-752-9843
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Highest altitude ice age human occupation documented in Peruvian Andes
In the southern Peruvian Andes, an archaeological team led by researchers at the University of Maine has documented the highest altitude ice age human occupation anywhere in the world -- nearly 4,500 meters above sea level.
Dan and Betty Churchill Exploration Fund, National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants Program, National Science Foundation

Contact: Margaret Nagle
nagle@maine.edu
207-581-3745
University of Maine

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Current Biology
Genomic data support early contact between Easter Island and Americas
People may have been making their way from Easter Island to the Americas well before Dutch commander Jakob Roggeveen arrived in 1722, according to new genomic evidence showing that the Rapanui people living on that most isolated of islands had significant contact with Native American populations hundreds of years earlier. The findings lend the first genetic support for such an early trans-Pacific route between Polynesia and the Americas, a trek of more than 4,000 kilometers.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Arrested development -- Sediment wreaks havoc with fish larvae
Sediments associated with dredging and flood plumes could have a significant impact on fish populations by extending the time required for the development of their larvae, according to Australian researchers

Contact: Eleanor Gregory
eleanor.gregory@jcu.edu.au
61-042-878-5895
ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies