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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
ICHRIE Penn State Research Reports
Marcellus drilling boom may have led to too many hotel rooms
Drilling in Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale region led to a rapid increase in both the number of hotels and hotel industry jobs, but Penn State researchers report that the faltering occupancy rate may signal that there are now too many hotel rooms.

Contact: Matt Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
GSA Bulletin
Tree rings and arroyos
A new GSA Bulletin study uses tree rings to document arroyo evolution along the lower Rio Puerco and Chaco Wash in northern New Mexico, USA. By determining burial dates in tree rings from salt cedar and willow, investigators were able to precisely date arroyo sedimentary beds 30 cm thick or greater. They then combined this data with aerial imagery, LiDAR, longitudinal profiles, and repeat surveys to reconstruct the history of these arroyos.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Microplastic pollution discovered in St. Lawrence River sediments
A team of researchers from McGill University and the Quebec government have discovered microplastics widely distributed across the bottom of the St. Lawrence River, the first time such pollutants have been found in freshwater sediments. Their research was published this month in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.

Contact: Jenny Ryan
jenny.ryan@nrcresearchpress.com
Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Geology
Miranda: An icy moon deformed by tidal heating
Miranda, a small, icy moon of Uranus, is one of the most visually striking and enigmatic bodies in the solar system. Despite its relatively small size, Miranda appears to have experienced an episode of intense resurfacing that resulted in the formation of at least three remarkable and unique surface features -- polygonal-shaped regions called coronae.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Nature Neuroscience
No sedative necessary: Scientists discover new 'sleep node' in the brain
A sleep-promoting circuit located deep in the primitive brainstem has revealed how we fall into deep sleep. Discovered by researchers at Harvard School of Medicine and the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, this is only the second 'sleep node' identified in the mammalian brain whose activity appears to be both necessary and sufficient to produce deep sleep.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ellen Goldbaum
goldbaum@buffalo.edu
716-645-4605
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Agricultural fires in the Ukraine
Numerous fires -- marked with red dots -- are burning in Eastern Europe, likely as a result of regional agricultural practices.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Jenner
lynn.a.jenner@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
NASA sees western edge of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong affecting Philippines
The NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite saw the western edge of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong over the central Philippines on Sept. 18. Fung-Wong developed on Sept. 17 as Tropical Depression 16W, and strengthened into a tropical storm by 5 p.m. EDT on Sept. 17.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Fall foliage season may be later, but longer on warmer Earth
The fall foliage season in some areas of the United States could come much later and possibly last a little longer by the end of the century as climate change causes summer temperatures to linger later into the year, according to Princeton University researchers. The delay could result in a longer growing season that would affect carbon uptake, agriculture, water supplies and animal behavior, among many other areas.

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
NASA marks Polo for a hurricane
Hurricane Polo still appears rounded in imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite, but forecasters at the National Hurricane Center expect that to change.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Edouard enter cooler waters
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite and Aqua satellite gathered data on Hurricane Edouard's rainfall, clouds and waning power is it continued moving northward in the Atlantic into cooler waters. On Sept. 18, NASA's Global Hawk #872 set out to investigate Edouard again as the storm is expected to weaken to a tropical storm
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Climate of the Past
First eyewitness accounts of mystery volcanic eruption
New light has been shed on one of the biggest volcanic eruptions in the last 500 years -- the so-called 'Unknown eruption' -- thanks to an unusual collaboration between a historian and a team of earth scientists at the University of Bristol, UK.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
0044-117-928-8896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Language evolution: Quicker on the uptake
Defects in the gene FOXP2 result in a severe speech disorder. As LMU researchers now show, when the functional version of the human gene is introduced into mice, it facilitates learning, and alters neuronal circuits in the brain which may have played a role in the evolution of language.

Contact: Wolfgang Enard
enard@bio.lmu.de
49-089-218-074-339
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
PLOS Biology
Withdrawal from the evolutionary race
In some HIV sufferers, the immune system does not fight off the immune deficiency virus. Instead, the body tolerates the pathogen. A research team headed by ETH Zurich has now determined how strongly patients differ in their tolerance and upon which factors it depends.

Contact: Roland Regoes
roland.regoes@env.ethz.ch
41-446-326-935
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Journal of Ecology
Tropical fish a threat to Mediterranean Sea ecosystems
The tropical rabbitfish which have devastated algal forests in the eastern Mediterranean Sea pose a major threat to the entire Mediterranean basin if their distribution continues to expand as the climate warms, a new study warns. Researchers surveyed more than 1000 kilometers of coastline in Turkey and Greece, where two species of plant-eating rabbitfish have become dominant, and found regions with abundant rabbitfish had become rocky barrens.

Contact: Deborah Smith
deborah.smith@unsw.edu.au
61-047-849-2060
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Science
A more efficient, lightweight and low-cost organic solar cell
For decades, polymer scientists and synthetic chemists working to improve the power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells were hampered by the inherent drawbacks of commonly used metal electrodes, including their instability and susceptibility to oxidation. Now for the first time, researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have developed a more efficient, easily processable and lightweight solar cell that can use virtually any metal for the electrode, effectively breaking the 'electrode barrier.'

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Genetics
Want to link genes to complex traits? Start with more diversity
Life is rarely simple. From crop yields to disease risks, the biological characteristics people care most about are considered 'complex traits,' making it hard to identify the genes involved. Standard methods for tracking down such genes usually only implicate a broad genomic region, and the identities of the crucial gene/s remain a mystery. Now, geneticists are embracing a powerful approach that pinpoints more precise areas of the genome.

Contact: Raeka Aiyar
press@genetics-gsa.org
202-412-1120
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Science
Changes in coastal upwelling linked to temporary declines in marine ecosystem
In findings of relevance to both conservationists and the fishing industry, new research links short-term reductions in growth and reproduction of marine animals off the California Coast to increasing variability in the strength of coastal upwelling currents -- currents which historically supply nutrients to the region's diverse ecosystem.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Advances in Water Resources
Nile River monitoring influences northeast Africa's future
Curtin University research that monitors the volume of water in the Nile River Basin will help to level the playing field for more than 200 million northeast Africans who rely on the river's water supply.

Contact: Vicki Brett
vicki.brett@curtin.edu.au
61-401-103-755
Curtin University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Shorebird's beak inspires UT Arlington research on water collection
A UT Arlington engineering professor and his doctoral student have designed a device based on a shorebird's beak that can accumulate water collected from fog and dew.

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Hurricane Edouard far from US, but creating rough surf
Although NASA's Aqua satellite showed that Hurricane Edouard is far from US soil, it is powerful enough that it is creating dangerous swells along the US East Coast.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Polo intensifying
Tropical storm warnings now issued for a portion of the Southwestern coast of Mexico as Polo continues to strengthen. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed powerful thunderstorms around the center of the storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
NASA sees Odile soaking Mexico and southwestern US
Tropical Storm Odile continues to spread moisture and generate strong thunderstorms with heavy rainfall over northern Mexico's mainland and the Baja California as well as the southwestern US. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite measured rainfall rates from space as it passed over Odile.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
SPIE Optics + Photonics
Proceedings of SPIE
Nature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologies
Solutions required for progress on the frontiers of photonics technology are close at hand: in nature, when viewed through the perspective of engineer, says Montana State University optics researcher Joseph Shaw. Along with Rongguang Liang of the University of Arizona, Shaw chaired the 'Light in Nature' conference presenting new research in the field last month at SPIE Optics + Photonics and being published in the SPIE Digital Library.

Contact: Amy Nelson
amy@spie.org
360-685-5478
SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Scientific Reports
Oxides discovered by CCNY team could advance memory devices
The quest for the ultimate memory device for computing may have just taken an encouraging step forward. Researchers at The City College of New York led by chemist Stephen O'Brien have discovered new complex oxides that exhibit both magnetic and ferroelectric properties.

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Coral growth rate plummets in 30-year comparison
A team of researchers working on a Carnegie expedition in Australia's Great Barrier Reef has documented that coral growth rates have plummeted 40 percent since the mid-1970s. The scientists suggest that ocean acidification may be playing an important role in this perilous slowdown.
Moore Foundation

Contact: Ken Caldeira
kcaldeira@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution