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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
APIC Ebola readiness survey findings
Only 6 percent of US hospitals are well-prepared to receive a patient with the Ebola virus, according to a survey of infection prevention experts at US hospitals conducted Oct. 10-15 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.
The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology

Contact: Liz Garman
egarman@apic.org
202-454-2604
Association for Professionals in Infection Control

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Prevention Science
Intervention program helps prevent high-school dropouts
New research findings from a team of prevention scientists at Arizona State University demonstrates that a family-focused intervention program for middle-school Mexican American children leads to fewer drop-out rates and lower rates of alcohol and illegal drug use. This research is especially significant since Mexican American youth face significant barriers that lead them to have one of the highest high-school drop-out rates in the nation.

Contact: Julie Newberg
julie.newberg@asu.edu
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
HortTechnology
Helping sweet cherries survive the long haul
Research into the effectiveness of hydrocooling of sweet cherries at commercial packing houses determined the need for post-packing cooling. Analyses determined that core temperatures achieved by in-line hydrocoolers during packing did not reduce temperatures sufficiently to ensure good quality retention over the longer periods of time required for container shipping to export markets. The study recommends forced-air cooling to further reduce sweet cherry temperatures in the box before shipping.

Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
International Journal of Health Services
Paperwork consumes one-sixth of US physicians' time and erodes morale: Study
The average US doctor spends 16.6 percent of his or her working hours on non-patient-related paperwork, time that might otherwise be spent caring for patients, according to an analysis of a nationally representative survey of physicians. Current trends in US health policy -- a shift to employment in large practices, the implementation of electronic medical records, and the increasing prevalence of financial risk sharing -- are likely to increase doctors' paperwork burdens and may decrease career satisfaction.

Contact: Mark Almberg
mark@pnhp.org
312-782-6006
Physicians for a National Health Program

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Fungal Biology
Herbal medicines could contain dangerous levels of toxic mold
Herbal medicines such as licorice, Indian rennet and opium poppy, are at risk of contamination with toxic mold, according to a new study published in Fungal Biology. The authors of the study, from the University of Peshawar, Pakistan say it's time for regulators to control mold contamination.

Contact: Sacha Boucherie
s.boucherie@elsevier.com
31-204-853-564
Elsevier

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Children in high-quality early childhood education are buffered from changes in family income
A new Norwegian study shows that while losses in family income ought to predict increases in behavior problems for many children, attending high-quality early childhood centers offered protection against economic decline. The study looked at 75,000 children from birth through age 3, in addition to their families. In Norway, publicly subsidized high-quality early childhood education and care is available to all children, from low-income to affluent, starting at age 1.
Norwegian Ministry of Health, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorder and Stroke, Research Council of Norway.

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Two days later: Adolescents' conflicts with family spill over to school, vice versa
Family conflict and problems at school tend to occur together on the same day. A new study has found that these problems spill over in both directions for up to two days after. The study found that teens with more pronounced mental health symptoms, anxiety and depression, for example, are at risk for intensified spillover. The study followed over a hundred 13 to 17 year olds and their parents over a 14-day period.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Teens whose parents exert more psychological control have trouble with closeness, independence
A new longitudinal study has found that teens whose parents exerted psychological control over them at age 13 had problems establishing healthy friendships and romantic relationships both in adolescence and into adulthood. The study followed 184 ethnically and socioeconomically diverse teens from age 13 to 21. It found that giving in to 'peer pressure' was more common among teens whose parents used guilt, withdrawing love, fostering anxiety, or other psychologically manipulative tactics.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Hazelden Publishing
National report finds bullying in schools still prevalent
Despite a dramatic increase in public awareness and anti-bullying legislation nationwide, the prevalence of bullying is still one of the most pressing issues facing our nation's youth, according to a report by researchers from Clemson University and Professional Data Analysts Inc., and published by the Hazelden Foundation.

Contact: Susan P. Limber
slimber@clemson.edu
864-656-6320
Clemson University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Child Development
Early intervention could boost education levels
Taking steps from an early age to improve childhood education skills could raise overall population levels of academic achievement by as much as 5 percent, and reduce socioeconomic inequality in education by 15 percent, according to international research led by the University of Adelaide.
National Health and Medical Research Council

Contact: Catherine Chittleborough
catherine.chittleborough@adelaide.edu.au
61-883-131-684
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
American Journal of Sports Medicine
Harvard study offers first-ever look at how NCAA concussion guidelines are followed
Though most NCAA colleges and universities have created programs to help athletes deal with concussions, a new Harvard study has found that, when it comes to specific components of those plans, many institutions still lag behind accepted standards.

Contact: Peter Reuell
preuell@fas.harvard.edu
617-496-8070
Harvard University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NOAA team discovers 2 vessels from WWII convoy battle off North Carolina
A team of researchers led by NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered two significant vessels from World War II's Battle of the Atlantic. The German U-boat 576 and the freighter Bluefields were found approximately 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina. Lost for more than 70 years, the discovery of the two vessels, in an area known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic, is a rare window into a historic military battle and the underwater battlefield landscape of WWII.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, UNC-Coastal Studies Institute, National Park Service

Contact: Lauren Heesemann
lauren.heesemann@noaa.gov
252-475-5495
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Study shows how texas campus police tackle stalking
One out of every five female students experience stalking victimization during their college career, but many of those cases are not reported to police, according to a study by the Crime Victims' Institute at Sam Houston State University.
Crime Victims' Institute

Contact: Beth Kuhles
kuhles@shsu.edu
936-294-4425
Sam Houston State University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Vaccine
Flu vaccine may hold key to preventing heart disease
Flu vaccines are known to have a protective effect against heart disease, reducing the risk of a heart attack. For the first time, this research, published in Vaccine, reveals the molecular mechanism that underpins this phenomenon. The scientists behind the study say it could be harnessed to prevent heart disease directly.

Contact: Sacha Boucherie
s.boucherie@elsevier.com
31-204-853-564
Elsevier

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
CHEST 2014
Chest
Two Michigan high school students develop screening tools to detect lung and heart disease
Two Michigan high school students, sisters Ilina and Medha Krishen, have developed screening tools using electronic stethoscopes to detect lung and heart disease. The sisters will present their findings at CHEST 2014 in Austin, Texas next week.

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
The Physics Teacher
Backpack physics: Smaller hikers carry heavier loads
Hikers are generally advised that the weight of the packs they carry should correspond to their own size, with smaller individuals carrying lighter loads. Although petite backpackers might appreciate the excuse to hand off heavier gear to the larger members of the group, it turns out that they may not need the help.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests
A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before may boost later learning.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Defense

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Educational Technology Research & Development
Digital native fallacy: Teachers still know better when it comes to using technology
Members of today's younger Net Generation aren't more tech savvy than their teachers just because they were born into a world full of computers. In fact, if it weren't for the coaxing and support of their educators, many students would never use their electronic devices for more than playing games or listening to music. So reports a new study in the journal Educational Technology Research & Development, published by Springer.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
Study shows no relationship between moderate adolescent cannabis use and exam results, IQ
A large UK study has found that occasional adolescent cannabis use does not lead to poorer educational and intellectual performance, but that heavy cannabis use is associated with slightly poorer exam results at age 16. The results come from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children a long-term study that follows the health of children born in the Bristol area in 1991 and 1992
UK Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, University of Bristol

Contact: Press Officer
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management
Head Start program benefits parents
Head Start programs may help low-income parents improve their educational status, according to a new study by Northwestern University researchers. The study is one of the first to examine whether a child's participation in the federal program benefits mothers and fathers -- in particular parents' educational attainment and employment.

Contact: Julie Deardorff
julie.deardorff@northwestern.edu
847-491-4890
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Anatomical Sciences Education
Cadavers beat computers for learning anatomy
Despite the growing popularity of using computer simulation to help teach college anatomy, students learn much better through the traditional use of human cadavers, according to new research that has implications for health care.

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Social Forces
New study finds that the probability of unprotected intercourse in hookups doubles between freshman
An article released by Social Forces titled, 'Casual Contraception in Casual Sex: Life-Cycle Change in Undergraduates' Sexual Behavior in Hookups' by Jonathan Marc Bearak (New York University) explores the changes in undergraduate uncommitted sexual behavior during years 1-4 of college. The article provides reasoning for the decline in the use of condoms, and explains how changes in the odds of coitus and condom use depend on family background, school gender imbalance, and whether the partners attend the same college.

Contact: Katherine Cooney
katherine.cooney@oup.com
212-726-6111
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Nature Reviews Neuroscience
Myth-conceptions: How myths about the brain are hampering teaching
Myths about the brain are common among teachers worldwide and are hampering teaching, according to new research.

Contact: Philippa Walker
philippa.walker@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Diversity in medical education: It's not so black and white anymore
A perspective piece in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine from a student at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine addresses the evolution of diversity in medical education.

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Gene variants implicated ADHD identify attention and language deficits general population
Are deficits in attention limited to those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or is there a spectrum of attention function in the general population? The answer to this question has implications for psychiatric diagnoses and perhaps for society, broadly.

Contact: Rhiannon Bugno
Biol.Psych@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-0880
Elsevier