EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
22-Oct-2014 20:50
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

News By Subject

Education


Search this subject:

 
Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Child Development
Early intervention could boost education levels
Taking steps from an early age to improve childhood education skills could raise overall population levels of academic achievement by as much as 5 percent, and reduce socioeconomic inequality in education by 15 percent, according to international research led by the University of Adelaide.
National Health and Medical Research Council

Contact: Catherine Chittleborough
catherine.chittleborough@adelaide.edu.au
61-883-131-684
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
American Journal of Sports Medicine
Harvard study offers first-ever look at how NCAA concussion guidelines are followed
Though most NCAA colleges and universities have created programs to help athletes deal with concussions, a new Harvard study has found that, when it comes to specific components of those plans, many institutions still lag behind accepted standards.

Contact: Peter Reuell
preuell@fas.harvard.edu
617-496-8070
Harvard University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NOAA team discovers 2 vessels from WWII convoy battle off North Carolina
A team of researchers led by NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered two significant vessels from World War II's Battle of the Atlantic. The German U-boat 576 and the freighter Bluefields were found approximately 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina. Lost for more than 70 years, the discovery of the two vessels, in an area known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic, is a rare window into a historic military battle and the underwater battlefield landscape of WWII.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, UNC-Coastal Studies Institute, National Park Service

Contact: Lauren Heesemann
lauren.heesemann@noaa.gov
252-475-5495
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Study shows how texas campus police tackle stalking
One out of every five female students experience stalking victimization during their college career, but many of those cases are not reported to police, according to a study by the Crime Victims' Institute at Sam Houston State University.
Crime Victims' Institute

Contact: Beth Kuhles
kuhles@shsu.edu
936-294-4425
Sam Houston State University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Vaccine
Flu vaccine may hold key to preventing heart disease
Flu vaccines are known to have a protective effect against heart disease, reducing the risk of a heart attack. For the first time, this research, published in Vaccine, reveals the molecular mechanism that underpins this phenomenon. The scientists behind the study say it could be harnessed to prevent heart disease directly.

Contact: Sacha Boucherie
s.boucherie@elsevier.com
31-204-853-564
Elsevier

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
CHEST 2014
Chest
Two Michigan high school students develop screening tools to detect lung and heart disease
Two Michigan high school students, sisters Ilina and Medha Krishen, have developed screening tools using electronic stethoscopes to detect lung and heart disease. The sisters will present their findings at CHEST 2014 in Austin, Texas next week.

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
The Physics Teacher
Backpack physics: Smaller hikers carry heavier loads
Hikers are generally advised that the weight of the packs they carry should correspond to their own size, with smaller individuals carrying lighter loads. Although petite backpackers might appreciate the excuse to hand off heavier gear to the larger members of the group, it turns out that they may not need the help.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests
A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before may boost later learning.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Defense

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Educational Technology Research & Development
Digital native fallacy: Teachers still know better when it comes to using technology
Members of today's younger Net Generation aren't more tech savvy than their teachers just because they were born into a world full of computers. In fact, if it weren't for the coaxing and support of their educators, many students would never use their electronic devices for more than playing games or listening to music. So reports a new study in the journal Educational Technology Research & Development, published by Springer.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
Study shows no relationship between moderate adolescent cannabis use and exam results, IQ
A large UK study has found that occasional adolescent cannabis use does not lead to poorer educational and intellectual performance, but that heavy cannabis use is associated with slightly poorer exam results at age 16. The results come from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children a long-term study that follows the health of children born in the Bristol area in 1991 and 1992
UK Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, University of Bristol

Contact: Press Officer
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management
Head Start program benefits parents
Head Start programs may help low-income parents improve their educational status, according to a new study by Northwestern University researchers. The study is one of the first to examine whether a child's participation in the federal program benefits mothers and fathers -- in particular parents' educational attainment and employment.

Contact: Julie Deardorff
julie.deardorff@northwestern.edu
847-491-4890
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Anatomical Sciences Education
Cadavers beat computers for learning anatomy
Despite the growing popularity of using computer simulation to help teach college anatomy, students learn much better through the traditional use of human cadavers, according to new research that has implications for health care.

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Social Forces
New study finds that the probability of unprotected intercourse in hookups doubles between freshman
An article released by Social Forces titled, 'Casual Contraception in Casual Sex: Life-Cycle Change in Undergraduates' Sexual Behavior in Hookups' by Jonathan Marc Bearak (New York University) explores the changes in undergraduate uncommitted sexual behavior during years 1-4 of college. The article provides reasoning for the decline in the use of condoms, and explains how changes in the odds of coitus and condom use depend on family background, school gender imbalance, and whether the partners attend the same college.

Contact: Katherine Cooney
katherine.cooney@oup.com
212-726-6111
Oxford University Press USA

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Nature Reviews Neuroscience
Myth-conceptions: How myths about the brain are hampering teaching
Myths about the brain are common among teachers worldwide and are hampering teaching, according to new research.

Contact: Philippa Walker
philippa.walker@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Diversity in medical education: It's not so black and white anymore
A perspective piece in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine from a student at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine addresses the evolution of diversity in medical education.

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Gene variants implicated ADHD identify attention and language deficits general population
Are deficits in attention limited to those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or is there a spectrum of attention function in the general population? The answer to this question has implications for psychiatric diagnoses and perhaps for society, broadly.

Contact: Rhiannon Bugno
Biol.Psych@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-0880
Elsevier

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Psychological Science
Teens' science interest linked with knowledge, but only in wealthier nations
It seems logical that a student who is interested in science as an academic subject would also know a lot about science, but new findings show that this link depends on the overall wealth of the country that the teen calls home. The research suggests that individual science achievement may be influenced as much by broad national-level resources as it is by personal interest and motivation.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Psychiatric Services
Psychiatrist appointments hard to get, even for insured: Study
Obtaining access to private outpatient psychiatric care in the Boston, Chicago and Houston metropolitan areas is difficult, even for those with private insurance or those willing to pay out of pocket. Harvard researchers, who posed on the phone as patients seeking appointments with individual psychiatrists, encountered numerous obstacles, including unreturned calls, and met with success only 26 percent of the time, according to a new study in Psychiatric Services.

Contact: Mark Almberg
mark@pnhp.org
312-782-6006
Physicians for a National Health Program

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal
Millennials uneducated on important clothing care skills, MU study finds
Researchers have found that a significant gap exists in the amount of 'common' clothes repair skills possessed by members of the baby boomer generation and millennials.

Contact: Nathan Hurst
hurstn@missouri.edu
573-882-6217
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
New treatment target identified for aggressive breast cancer
One of the first-known oncogenes has a protein partner that helps breast cancer proliferate and when it's blocked, so is the cancer, scientists report.

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of School Health
More physical activity improved school performance
Just two hours of extra physical activity each week can improve school performance. This has been shown by a study of approximately 2,000 12-year-olds carried out by scientists at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

Contact: Krister Svahn
krister.svahn@sahlgrenska.gu.se
46-031-786-3869
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Annals of Oncology
EMA open to discuss use of complementary methodologies for rare cancers
Rare Cancers Europe (RCE) is a multi stakeholder initiative promoted by ESMO dedicated to putting rare cancers on the European political agenda. In their consensus document, RCE argue that a higher degree of uncertainty should be accepted for regulatory as well as clinically informed decision-making in rare cancers, to overcome the limitations imposed by small population trials.

Contact: Rare Cancers Europe
rarecancerseurope@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Institutional rearing may increase risk attention-deficit disorder
Over the past decades, we have seen numerous tragic examples where the failure of institutions to meet the needs of infants for social contact and stimulation has led to the failure of these infants to thrive.

Contact: Rhiannon Bugno
Biol.Psych@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-0880
Elsevier

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Biology Letters
What goes up must come down
Geckos employ an adhesive system that facilitates their climbing vertically, and even in inverted positions. But can geckos employ this system when moving downhill? Biologists at the University of California, Riverside have conducted lab experiments on geckos to find that when moving on steep downhill surfaces geckos reverse the position of their hind feet to potentially use the adhesive system as a brake and/or stabilizer, resulting in the digits of the hind feet facing backwards.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Jobs plentiful for college grads
The job market for new college graduates is red hot. After several years of modest growth, hiring is expected to jump a whopping 16 percent for newly minted degree-holders in 2014-15.

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University