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Key: Meeting Journal Funder
Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
BBA: Molecular Basis of Disease
Factor in naked mole rat's cells enhances protein integrity
Scientists from the Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found a factor in naked mole rat cells that could be one of the secrets to how the rodent defies aging.

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
PLOS Pathogens
The early cost of HIV
Researchers at UC Davis have made some surprising discoveries about the body's initial responses to HIV infection.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of California - Davis RISE, California HIV Research Program, NIH/Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health

Contact: Carole Gan
carole.gan@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9047
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science
New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame rabbits
Until recently, little has been known about what genetic changes transform wild animals into domesticated ones. An international team of scientists, including a University of Montana assistant professor, has made a breakthrough by showing that genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domestication.

Contact: Jeff Good
jeffrey.good@umontana.edu
406-243-5771
The University of Montana

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Cell Reports
Preventing cancer from forming 'tentacles' stops dangerous spread
A new study from the research group of Dr. John Lewis at the University of Alberta and the Lawson Health Research Institute has confirmed that 'invadopodia' play a key role in the spread of cancer. The study, published in Cell Reports, shows preventing these tentacle-like structures from forming can stop the spread of cancer entirely.
Canadian Cancer Society, Alberta Cancer Foundation, Prostate Cancer Canada, Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Ross Neitz
rneitz@ualberta.ca
780-492-5986
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
Study reveals how Ebola blocks immune system
Researchers have identified one way the Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses, providing important insight that could lead to new therapies.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Brian Grabowski
media@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Bone
Revealing a novel mode of action for an osteoporosis drug
Raloxifene is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for decreasing fracture risk in osteoporosis. While raloxifene is as effective at reducing fracture risk as other current treatments, this works only partially by suppressing bone loss. X-ray studies revealed an additional mechanism underlying raloxifene action, providing an explanation for how this drug can achieve equivalent clinical benefit.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
PLOS Computational Biology
Assortativity signatures of transcription factor networks contribute to robustness
The assortativity signature of transcription factor networks is an indication of robustness.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Donna Dubuc
Donna.M.Dubuc@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-3615
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
CCNY team defines new biodiversity metric
To understand how the repeated climatic shifts over the last 120,000 years may have influenced today's patterns of genetic diversity, a team of researchers led by City College of New York biologist Dr. Ana Carnaval developed a new biodiversity metric called 'phylogeographic endemism.'
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Nature
Leading Ebola researcher at UTMB says there's an effective treatment for Ebola
A leading US Ebola researcher from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has gone on record stating that a blend of three monoclonal antibodies can completely protect monkeys against a lethal dose of Ebola virus up to five days after infection, at a time when the disease is severe. Thomas Geisbert, professor of microbiology and immunology, has written an editorial for Nature discussing advances in Ebola treatment research.

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@gmail.com
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Mice study shows efficacy of new gene therapy approach for toxin exposures
New research led by Charles Shoemaker, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, shows that gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention and treatment of botulism exposure over current methods. The findings of the National Institutes of Health funded study appear in the Aug. 29 issue of PLOS ONE.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Rushmie A Nofsinger
rushmie.nofsinger@tufts.edu
508-839-7910
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Rapamycin or FK506, which is better for SCs migration and peripheral nerve repair
Rapamycin promoted the secretion of nerve growth factors and upregulated growth-associated protein 43 expression in Schwann cells, but did not significantly affect Schwann cell proliferation. Therefore, rapamycin has potential application in peripheral nerve regeneration therapy.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Current Biology
Ready for mating at the right time
Fish rely on pheromones to trigger social responses and to coordinate reproductive behavior in males and females. Scientists at the Marine Science Center at the University of the Algarve in Faro, Portugal, and at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have now identified such a signal molecule in the urine of male Mozambique tilapia: this pheromone boosts hormone production and accelerates oocyte maturation in reproductive females.
Foundation for Science and Technology of Portugal, Max Planck Society

Contact: Dr. Bernd Schneider
schneider@ice.mpg.de
49-364-157-1600
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science
Hydrogen powers important nitrogen-transforming bacteria
An international team of scientists led by Holger Daims, a microbiologist at the University of Vienna, has now shown that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria can use hydrogen as an alternative source of energy. The oxidation of hydrogen with oxygen enables their growth independent of nitrite and a lifestyle outside the nitrogen cycle. The study is published in the current issue of the journal Science.

Contact: Holger Daims
daims@microbial-ecology.net
43-142-777-6604
University of Vienna

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
GSA Bulletin
Snails tell of the rise and fall of the Tibetan Plateau
The rise of the Tibetan plateau -- the largest topographic anomaly above sea level on Earth -- is important for both its profound effect on climate and its reflection of continental dynamics. In this study published in GSA Bulletin, Katharine Huntington and colleagues employ a cutting-edge geochemical tool -- 'clumped' isotope thermometry -- using modern and fossil snail shells to investigate the uplift history of the Zhada basin in southwestern Tibet.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
The ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
Not all phytoplankton in the ocean need to take their vitamins
Some species of marine phytoplankton, such as the prolific bloomer Emiliania huxleyi, can grow without consuming vitamin B1 (thiamine), researchers have discovered.
National Center for Genome Resources, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Packard Foundation

Contact: Lindsay Jolivet
lindsay.jolivet@cifar.ca
416-971-4876
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
CU scientists' discovery could lead to new cancer treatment
A team of scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine has reported the breakthrough discovery of a process to expand production of stem cells used to treat cancer patients. These findings could have implications that extend beyond cancer, including treatments for inborn immunodeficiency and metabolic conditions and autoimmune diseases.

Contact: Kris Kitto
kris@morethanpr.com
303-320-7790
The Bawmann Group

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
ACS Nano
Copper shines as flexible conductor
By turning instead to copper, both abundant and cheap, researchers at Monash University and the Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication have developed a way of making flexible conductors cost-effective enough for commercial application.

Contact: Glynis Smalley
glynis.smalley@monash.edu
61-408-027-848
Monash University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Penn-NIH team discover new type of cell movement
In a new study from the University of Pennsylvania and National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, scientists used an innovative technique to study how cells move in a three-dimensional matrix, similar to the structure of certain tissues, such as the skin. They discovered an entirely new type of cell movement whereby the nucleus helps propel cells through the matrix like a piston in an engine.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
American Journal of Botany
Together, humans and computers can figure out the plant world
Recent research applying bioinformatics and biometrics to the study of plant form and function is presented in a special issue on Bioinformatic and Biometric Methods in Plant Morphology, published in Applications in Plant Sciences. The methods presented in the issue include automated classification and identification, a new online pollen database with semantic search capabilities, geometric morphometrics, and skeleton networks, and present a picture of a renaissance in morphometric approaches that capitalize on recent technological advances.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Parada
apps@botany.org
American Journal of Botany

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Dental Hygiene
UTHealth researchers find up to 3,000 times the bacterial growth on hollow-head toothbrushes
Solid-head power toothbrushes retain less bacteria compared to hollow-head toothbrushes, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Dentistry.
Advanced Response Corporation

Contact: Edgar Veliz
Edgar.R.Veliz@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3307
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Biomedical Optics Express
This is your brain's blood vessels on drugs
Researchers from Stony Brook University and NIH used a laser-based method to produce the first-ever set of images clearly and directly detailing how cocaine shuts down blood flow in the brain. This could help doctors and researchers better understand how drug abuse affects the brain, which may aid in improving brain-cancer surgery and tissue engineering, and lead to better treatment for recovering drug addicts. The work was published today in the journal Biomedical Optics Express.

Contact: Angela Stark
astark@osa.org
202-416-1443
The Optical Society

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
European Physical Journal B
Inter-dependent networks stress test
Energy production systems are good examples of complex systems. Their infrastructure equipment requires ancillary sub-systems structured like a network -- including water for cooling, transport to supply fuel, and ICT systems for control and management. Every step in the network chain is interconnected with a wider network and they are all mutually dependent. Gaihua Fu and colleagues have studied various aspects of inter-network dependencies, not previously explored, and their findings have been published in EPJ B.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Home is where the microbes are
A study published today in Science reports provides a detailed analysis of the microbes that live in houses and apartments. The study was conducted by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Genomic sequencing reveals mutations, insights into 2014 Ebola outbreak
In response to an ongoing, unprecedented outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa, a team of researchers from the Broad Institute and Harvard University, in collaboration with the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation and researchers across institutions and continents, has rapidly sequenced and analyzed more than 99 Ebola virus genomes. Their findings could have important implications for rapid field diagnostic tests. The team reports its results online in the journal Science.
Common Fund, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, US Department of Health and Human Services, National Science Foundation, European Union Seventh Framework Programme, Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Haley Bridger
hbridger@broadinstitute.org
617-714-7968
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Obesity
Healthy Moms program helps women who are obese limit weight gain during pregnancy
A new study finds that women who are obese can limit their weight gain during pregnancy using conventional weight loss techniques including attending weekly group support meetings, seeking advice about nutrition and diet, and keeping food and exercise journals.

Contact: Vincent Staupe
vstaupe@golin.com
415-318-4386
Kaiser Permanente